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INIVERSirytflLUNOt 



IOWA STATE 
COLLEGE 

1901-1902 



learning anb f abor. 

LIBRARY 

| Universityof Illinois. 

CLASS. BOOK. VOLUME. 

Accession No. 



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IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



.OF. 



AGRICULTURE 



.AND. 



THE MECHANIC ARTS 



CATALOG 1901-1902 



SCIENCE WITH PRACTICE' 



1902 

BY THE COLLEGE 

AMES 



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CALLENDAR FOR 1902-1903 



1902. 

First Term of College Yearbegins Mon., Sept. 1. 

Entrance Examinations, Mon.-Tues., Sept. 1-2. 

Recitations begin, Wed., Sept. 3. 

Thanksgiving Day, Thurs., Nov. 27. 

Term Examinations, Dec. 22-23. 

Winter Vacation Dec. 23, 1902, to Jan. 21, 1903. 

1903. 

Second Term of College Year begins Wed., Jan. 21. 

Entrance Examinations Wed.-Thurs., Jan. 21-22. 

Recitations begin, Fri., Jan. 23. 

Memorial Day, Sat., May 30. 

Baccalaureate Address Sun., May 31. 

P Term Examinations June 1-2 

5 Commencement Wed., June 3. 



i? 



■ 



?3 



OFFICERS OF THE COLLEGE 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

Hon. J. B. Hungerford, Carroll Chairman 

Edgar William Stanton, Ames Secretary 

Herman Knapp, Ames Treasurer 

W. A. Helsell, Odebolt Financial Secretary 

John Franklin Cavell, Ames Steward 

members of the board. 

Ex-officio — Hon. Albert B. Cummins, Governor of Iowa. 
Ex-officio — Hon. R. C. Barrett, Superintendent of Public 
Instruction. 

Term Expires. 

First District— Hon. S. H. Watkins, Libertyville 1904 

Second District — Hon. C. L. Barclay, West Liberty.. .1904 

Third District — Hon. E. A. Alexander, Clarion 1908 

Fourth District — Hon. C. L. Gabrilsen, New Hampton. 1904 

Fifth District— Hon. W. R. Moninger, Galvin 1906 

Sixth District— Hon. W. O. McElroy, Newton 1908 

Seventh District — Hon. W. K. Boardman, Nevada ....1906 

Eighth District— Hon. W. B. Penick, Chariton 1904 

Ninth District— Ho.x. James H. WILSON, Adair 1908 

Tenth District— Hon. J. B. Hungerford, Carroll 1906 

Eleventh District— Hon. W. J. Dixon, Sac City 1906 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

GROUP I. 

Finance Committee: Gov. Cummins, Trustees McElroy, Bar- 
clay, Penick, Alexander, Hungerford. 

Building Committee'. Trustees Dixon, Hungerford, Board- 
man; additional members, Watkins, Gabrilsen. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 7 

GROUP II. 

Committee on Agriculture, Horticulture, Experiment Station 
and Veterinary Science: Trustees Barclay, Boardman, 
Moninger, Wilson, Gov. Cummins. 

Committee on Engineering Departments and Physics: Trus- 
tees Gabrilsen, Barrett, McElroy, Hungerford, Dixon. 

Committee on Steward's Department, College Hospital and 
Sanitary Arrangements: Trustees Watkins, Moninger, 
Penick. 

GROUP III. 

Committee on Faculty and Courses of Study: Trustees 
McElroy, Barrett, Hungerford, Gabrilsen, Alexander, 
Dixon. 

Committee on College Lands and Investments: Trustees Pen- 
ick, Moninger, Gov. Cummins. 

Committee on Rules: Trustees Wilson, Boardman, Alex- 



ander. 



GROUP IV. 



Committee on Scientific Departments: Trustees Alexander, 

Gabrilsen, Barrett, McElroy, Watkins. 
Committee on Literary Departments and Library: Trustees 

Boardman, Barrett, Alexander, Penick. 
Committee on Public Grounds and Assignment of Rooms: 

Trustees Hungerford, Alexander, Barclay. 
Committee on Bonds: Trustees Moninger, Wilson. 

MEETINGS. 

The regular meetings of the Board of Trustees are held 
in June and November. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



W. M. BEARDSHEAR, A. M., LL. D., 

President. 

M. STALKER, M. Sc., V. S., 
Lecturer on Examination for Soundness. 

J. L. BUDD, M. H., 

Professor Emeritus in Horticulture. 

EDGAR WILLIAM STANTON, M. Sc, 

Professor of Mathematics and Economic Science. 

GEN. JAMES RUSH LINCOLN, 

Professor of Military Science. 

ALFRED ALLEN BENNETT, M. Sc, 

Professor of Chemistry. 

LOUIS HERMAN PAMMEL, B. Ag., M. Sc, Ph. D., 
Professor of Botany. 

*HON. JAMES WILSON, M. S. A., 

GEORGE WELTON BISSELL, M. E., 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

ANSON MARSTON, C. E., 
Professor of Civil Engineering. 

JULIUS BUEL WEEMS, Ph. D., 

Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. 

CHARLES F. CURTISS, B. Sc, M. S. A., 

Director of Experiment Station and Professor of Agriculture. 

MISS LIZZIE MAY ALLIS, B. A., M. A., 
Professor of French and German. 

LOUIS BEVIER SPINNEY, B. M. E., M. Sc, 

Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering. 



♦Granted indefinite leave of absence as Secretary of Agricul- 
ture. 



10 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

SAMUEL WALKER BEYER, B. Sc, Ph. D., 

Professor of Geology and Mining Engineering. 

ALVIN B. NOBLE, B. Ph., 

Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature. 

HENRY E. SUMMERS, B. S., 

Professor of Zoology. 

ADRIAN M. NEWENS, B. 0., 
Professor of Elocution and Associate in English. 

JOHN J. REPP., V. M. D., 

Professor of Pathology and Therapeutics. 

GEORGE LEWIS McKAY, 

Professor of Dairying. 

ORANGE HOWARD CESSNA, A. M., D. D., 
Professor of History and Philosophy. 

JOHN H. McNEALL., V. M. D., 
Professor of Anatomy and Principles and Practice of Surgery. 

MISS MARY A. SABIN, B. A., 

Professor of Domestic Economy. 

HOMER C. PRICE, M. S. A., 

Professor of Horticulture and Forestry. 

W. J. KENNEDY. B. S. A., 
Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

CARL W. GAY, D. V. M., 

Professor of Veterinary Medicine and Sanitary Science 

Professor of Agronomy. 

WARREN H. MEEKER. M. E., 

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

BURTON S. LANPHEAR, M. M. E., 

A: islaul Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

C. W. J. NEVILLE, M. C. E.. 
Assi: itanl Professor of Civil Engineering. 

FRANK -I. RESLBR, B. Ph., 

Director Of Music. Vocalist. 

MRS. MARIAN II. KILBOURNE, B. L, 

I >< an of Women. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 11 

WILBERT EUGENE HARRIMAN, B. Sc, M. D., 

College Physician. 

MISS MARIA M. ROBERTS, B. L., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS ELMINA WILSON, C. E., 
Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

TALBOT LENNOX, 

Instructor in Machine Shop. 

EZRA C. POTTER. 

Instructor in Pattern Shop. 

EDWIN CLARK BOUTELLE, B. M. E., 

Instructor in Forge and Foundry. 

MRS. ELIZABETH RESLER, B. Ph., 
Instructor in Instrumental Music. 

JOSEPH J. EDGERTON, B. Ag., 
Instructor in Agricultural Physics, Farm Foreman. 

MISS LOLA PLACEWAY, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Chemistry. 
MISS BESSIE LARRABEE, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 

IRA A. WILLIAMS, B. Sc. 

Instructor in Geology and Mining Engineering. 

MISS ELIZABETH MACLEAN, M. Di., 

Instructor in English. 

ERNEST ALANSON PATTENGILL, B. S„ 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

A. T. ERWIN, B. S., 

Instructor in Horticulture. 

MISS ALICE HESS, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Domestic Economy. 

E. B. TUTTLE, B. S. in E. E., 
Instructor in Physics. 

MISS A. ESTELLA PADDOCK, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Botany. 



12 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

LOUIS E. YOUNG. B. Mm. E., 

Instructor in Mining Engineering. 

EDWARD E. LITTLE, M. S. A., 

Assistant in Horticulture. 

F. R. MARSHALL, B. S. A., 
Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 

MISS JULIA COLPITTS, M. A., 
Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS HELEN G. REED., Ph. B„ 

Instructor in English. 

MISS GRACE I. NORTON, B. A., 

Instructor in German. 

JULIA A. STANTON, B. L., 

Instructor in History. 

FRANK W. BOUSKA, M. Sc. A., 

Instructor in Dairy Bacteriology. 

MISS ADA J. MILLER, Ph. B., 
Instructor in English. 

WILBUR M. WILSON, B. M. E., 

Instructor in Mechanical and Pree-Hand Drawing. 

MISS ORA F. EDGETT. B. Sc, 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

E. C. MYERS. B. S. A., 

Instructor in Agricultural Chemistry. 

JOSEPH E. GUTHRIE, M. Sc, 
Instructor in Zoology. 

C. LARSON, B. S. A., 
Assistant in Dairying. 

DELLA M. JOHNSON, B. Ph., 

Instructor in Domestic Economy. 

GEORGE JUDISCH, 

Director <>f Wtorinary Dispensary and Lecturer on Pharmacy. 

AL DUEBENDORFER, 
Gardener. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 13 

MISS VINA ELETHE CLARK, 
Librarian. 

MISS OLIVE E. STEVENS, B. L., 
Assistant Librarian. 



NON-RESIDENT LECTURERS 



IRA C. BROWNLIE, B. Sc, Ames, Iowa, 
Oral Bacteriology. 

C. G. LEE, B. S., LL. D., Ames, Iowa, 
Veterinary Jurisprudence. 

W. J. KARNER, C. E., Chicago, Illinois, 
An Engineer in Mexico. 

M. J. RIGGS. B. C. E., 

Manager Toledo Branch American Bridge Co., Toledo, Ohio. 
Modern Bridge Plants. 



14 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 



W. M. BEARDSHEAR, A. M., LL. D.. 

President. 

*JAMES WILSON, M. Sc, A., 

C. F. CURTISS, B. Sc., M. S. A., 
Director and Agriculturalist. 

J. B. WEEMS, Ph. D.. 
Chemist. 

L. H. PAMMELL, B. AG., M. Sc, PH. D., 

Botanist. 

H. E. SUMMERS. B. S., 
Entomologist. 

HOMER C. PRICE, M. S. A., 

Horticulturalist. 

W. J. KENNEDY, B. S. A., 
Animal Husbandry and Vice Director. 

JOHN J. REPP. V. M. D., 

Veterinarian. 

G. L. McKAY. 
Dairying. 

Professor of Agronomy. 

JOSEPH J. EDGERTON, B. Ac, 
Assistant in Agricultural Physics. 

KltANK W. BOUSKA, B. S. A., 
Assist ;i n t in Dairying and Dairy Bacteriology. 



"Granted an indefinite leave of absence as Secretary of Agri- 
cull m I 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 15 

C. E. GRAY, B. S. A.. 

Assistant Chemist. 

B. E. LITTLE, M. S. A., 

Assistant in Horticulture. 

, F. R. MARSHALL, B. S. A., 

Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 

C. LARSON. B. S. A., 

Assistant in Dairying. 

MISS A. ESTELLA PADDOCK, B. Sc, 

Assistant in Botany. 

JOSEPH E. GUTHRIE, M. Sc, 

Assistant Entomologist. 

CHARLOTTE M. KING, 

Artist. 



HISTORICAL 



LOCATION 



BUILDINGS, GROUNDS AND EQUIPMENTS 



18 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



HISTORICAL 



In 1858 the Legislature of Iowa passed an act to 
establish "A State Agricultural College and Model Farm," 
to be connected with the entire agricultural interests of the 
State; appointed a board of commissioners to buy a farm 
and erect a college building, antl elected a board of trustees 
to select a faculty and organize a college. In 1859 a farm 
of six hundred and forty acres, situated near Ames, was 
purchased for the use of the college. The farm now con- 
tains eight hundred and forty acres. 

In 1862 a bill was passed by Congress, entitled, "An 
act donating public lands to the several States and Terri- 
tories, which may provide colleges for the benefit of 
Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts." 

Section 1 of this act provides that for the support of 
such colleges there be granted "an amount of public land, 
to be apportioned to each State in quantity to equal thirty 
thousand acres for each Senator and Representative in 
Congress to which the States are respectively entitled by 
the apportionment under the census of 1860; provided that 
no mineral lands shall be selected or purchased under the 
provisions of this act." 

Section 4 requires: "That all moneys derived from 
the Bale of lands ^foresaid by the States to which lands 
are apportioned, and from the sale of land script, herein- 
before provided for, shall constitute a perpetual fund, the 
capital of which shall remain forever undiminished (except 
as may be provided for in section fifth of this act), and the 
Interest of which shall inviolably be apportioned by each 
State Which may take and claim the benefit of this act, to 



HISTORICAL. 19 

the endowment, support and maintenance of at least one 
college, where the leading object shall be, without exclud- 
ing other scientific and classical studies, and including 
military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are 
related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such 
manner as the Legislature of the State may provide, in 
order to promote the liberal and practical education of the 
industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions 
of life." 

Section 5 says: "And be it further enacted, that the 
grant of land and land script hereby authorized, shall be 
made on the following conditions, to whicn, as well as the 
provisions hereinbefore contained, the previous assent of 
the several States shall be signified by legislative acts; 
first, if any portion of the fund, invested as provided by the 
foregoing section, or any portion of the interest thereon, 
shall, by any action or contingency, be dimished or lost, 
it shall be replaced by the State to which it belongs, so that 
the capital of the fund shall remain forever undiminished; 
and the annual interest shall be regularly applied without 
diminution to the purposes mentioned in the fourth section 
of this act, except that a sum not exceeding ten per centum 
upon the amount received by any State under the provi- 
sions of this act, may be expended for the purchase of land 
for sites or experimental farms, wherever authorized by 
the respective Legislatures of said States. Second, no 
portion of said fund nor the interest tnereon shall be 
applied, directly or indirectly, under any pretense whatever, 
to the purchase, erection, preservation or repair of any 
building or buildings." 

The General Assembly of Iowa, September 11, 1862, 
accepted the grant upon the conditions and under the re- 
strictions contained in the act of Congress, and by so doing 
entered into contract with the General Government to 
erect and keep in repair all buildings necessary for the 
use of the College. By this action of the General Assembly 
the College was changed from an agricultural institution 
into a College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, with the 



20 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

broad and liberal course of study outlined in the following 
paragraph. 

In 1882 the General Assembly passed an act defining 
the course of study to be pursued as follows: Section 1. 
That section 1621 of the Code is hereby repealed and the 
following is enacted in lieu thereof: "Section 1621. There 
shall be adopted and taught in the State Agricultural 
College, a broad, liberal and practical course of study, in 
which the leading branches of learning shall relate to 
agriculture and the mechanic arts, and which shall also 
embrace such other branches of learning as will most 
practically and liberally educate the agricultural and indus- 
trial classes in the several pursuits and professions of life, 
including military tactics. Section 2. That all acts, and 
parts of acts inconsistent with this act are hereby repealed." 

August 30th the following act was approved by Presi- 
dent Harrison: "Be it enacted by the Senate and House 
of Representatives of the United States in Congress assem- 
bled, that there shall be and hereby is, annually appro- 
priated, out of any moneys in the treasury not otherwise 
appropriated, arising from the sales of public lands, to be 
paid as hereinafter provided, to each State and Territory 
for the more complete endowment and maintenance ot 
colleges for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic 
arts now established, or which may hereafter be established, 
in accordance with an act of Congress approved July second, 
eighteen hundred and sixty-two, the sum of fifteen thousand 
dollars for the year ending June thirtieth, eighteen hun- 
dred and ninety, and an annual increase of the amount 
of such appropriation thereafter for ten years by an addi- 
tional sum of one thousand dollars over the preceding year, 
and the annual amount to be paid thereafter to each State 
and Territory shall be twenty -five thousand dollars, to be 
applied only to instruction in agriculture, the mechanic 
arts, the English language and the various branches of 
mathematical, physical, natural and economic science, with 
special reference to their application in the industries of 
lit. , and to facilities for such instruction." 



HISTORICAL. 21 

The income of the College from National grants is 
therefore expended in instruction, experimentation and 
illustration in agriculture and in the mechanic arts, and 
in underlying and related science and literature. 

All buildings are erected and all repairs thereon are 
made by the State of Iowa, the cost down to date being 
about $500,000. 

The College was formally opened on the 17th of March, 
1869. 



22 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



AMES AND THE COLLEGE 



The College occupies a delightful and healthful location 
upon high rolling land, just west of Ames, Story County. 
The railroad facilities for reaching Ames from every part 
of the State are excellent. It is at the junction of the Des 
Moines arid the northwestern branches and the main line of 
the Chicago & Northwestern R. R. The main line of the 
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul intersects the Northwestern 
at Slater, eleven miles south, and the through line of the 
same system at Algona on the north. The main line of the 
Illinois Central intersects the Chicago & Northwestern at 
Webster City, just north, and the main line of the Iowa 
Central makes good connections at Marshalltown on the 
east. All the railway connections of Des Moines have 
thirty-seven miles to Ames. The Chicago & Northwestern 
Railway has frequent trains Des Moines to Ames and 
return. A steam motor railway connects Ames and the 
College with efficient service. Ames is a most desirable 
town for wholesome college influences. Its people are 
enterprising, thrifty and cordial. The town has an excel- 
lent system of public schools, numerous churches, water 
works, electric lights, and a good city government. It 
affords wholesome surroundings for the students. It is an 
inviting community for families who wish to educate their 
children, enjoy the hotter elements of society and an 
environment of reasonable expenses. The town and the 
College are on very cordial terms, and its citizens take 
marl ed pains In the efforts <>r the students and the highest 
Interests of the College, it is a model location fof factories 
and business enterprises. 



BUILDINGS, GROUNDS AND EQUIPMENT. 23 



BUILDINGS, GROUNDS AND EQUIPMENT 



BUILDINGS. 



Seventeen commodious buildings have been erected by 
the State, for the exclusive use of the various departments 
of the College, besides the dwelling houses and buildings for 
farm stock, machinery and work. 

The main College building is five stories high, including 
the basement, and is 158 feet long by 112 feet through the 
wings. 

This building is used for dormitory and the department 
of botany, with recitation, society and reception rooms. 
About 250 students and teachers can be accommodated in 
this building. 

All the rooms are heated by steam and lighted by 
electricity. Pure water is supplied in all the stories of the 
buildings. 

There are also two rooming cottages, brick buildings, 
affording rooms for ninety-four students. The cottages 
are supplied with pure water, and lighted by electricity. 

The other buildings are as follows, used for recitation 
and lecture rooms and laboratories: 

Chemical and Physical Hall: Brick, three stories 
throughout; steam heat; water and gas. Laboratory outfit 
complete for 100 students in Chemistry; also nearly as 
many in Physics. 

Veterinary Hospital: Brick, three stories, containing 
offices, dissecting rooms, and all modern appliances for the 
treatment of diseased animals. 

Sanitary Hall: Frame, two stories; lower floor, office, 
kitchen and dining room for the hospital patients and rooms 



24 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

for convalescents; upper floor, seven rooms for care of sick 
among the students. 

Engineering Hall: Brick, four stories, including base- 
ment, and large "L," containing machine shops, recitation 
rooms, drawing rooms, for the departments of Mechanical 
and Civil Engineering. 

The Wood Shops: Brick, containing carpenter and pat- 
tern shops, with power and hand tools complete for wood 
work, and outfit of tools for individual work. 

Forge Shop and Foundry: Brick, containing complete 
equipment for forging and moulding. 

The Main Engineering Hall: September 1st, 1902, the 
Engineering Department will occupy the new Engineering 
Hall. This is a fire-proof building in which all the engi- 
neering departments have offices, recitation and lecture 
rooms, laboratories and engineering museum. This build- 
ing is of Bedford stone, has plate glass windows, and 
modern conveniences and furnishings throughout. It is the 
best engineering building at present west of the Mississippi 
river. 

Power House: Brick, one story, contains engine and 
boiler, furnishing power for the shops, and accommodates 
experimental work of the course in Mechanical Engineer- 
ing. The dynamos and motor power for electric engineer- 
ing are now in this building, also the deep well pump. 

Locomotive Laboratory: This building contains an 
eight-wheel locomotive and tender presented by the Chicago 
& Northwestern Railway Company. 

Music Hall: Brick, two stories, fitted up with appar- 
atus and instruments lor practive and instruction. 

The Administrative Building: Brick, for the use of trus- 
tees and faculty, and Cor offices of the president, secretary 
and treasurer, 

ha riling Houses: Eighteen comfortable dwelling houses 
on the grounds are occupied by professor's families, and 
everal others by foremen and employes. 



BUILDINGS, GROUNDS AND EQUIPMENT. 25 

Morrill Hall is named in honor of Hon. Justin S. Mor- 
rill, the originator of the "Land Grant" for Colleges of 
Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. The building cost about 
$35,000, including water supply, steam heat and electric 
light. It is of deep red brick, with stone foundation, and 
stone, brick and terra cotta trimmings interblended. 

It stands on the high ground of the beautiful campus, 
north of and near the main building. It is for Chapel, 
capacity, 650; Library, containing 15,000 volumes; the 
Museum, Lecture Rooms and Laboratories of the Depart- 
ments of Zoology and Geology. 

Agricultural Hall is a four-story building. The lower 
stories are composed of stone from the State quarries at 
Anamosa, and the upper stories are brick. It contains 
rooms for Horticulture, Agriculture, Agricultural Chem- 
istry, Experiment Station work and Veterinary Medicine. 
It is finely lighted and heated and contains modern im- 
provements. 

Green House: Contains propagating room, palm house 
and modern green house facilities . 

The Horticultural Laboratory is a building 35x50 feet, 
two stories with basement. It is connected with the green 
house. The main room contains desk room and lockers for 
25 students. Adjoining is a pomology room with bench 
room for 25 students to work in the study of fruits. The 
building is provided with two refrigerators, one for exper- 
imental work in cold storage and the other for storing 
fruits for class purposes. The second floor is provided with 
horticultural museum facilities for photography. 

Horse Barn and Stock Pavilion: A new barn composed 
of brick, slate roof, has just been completed for horses, the 
storage of grain and general farm purposes. One of the 
best stock pavilions in the country accommodating several 
hundred students at a time, circular in form, well heated 
and lighted, is located near this barn and gives first class 
advantages for stock judging and animal husbandry. 

Other Buildings: Creamery, stables, barns, sheep and 
swine houses, seed houses, etc., sufficient for the require- 



26 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

merits of the farm, are conveniently grouped near the 
College Campus. 



MARGARET HALL. 



A commodious and inviting building has been opened 
for the young women in the College. It is designed with 
choice architecture, composed of brick, roofed with slate 
and finished with taste. It occupies one of the most sightly 
locations on the campus, giving the most pleasing outlook 
to its occupants. It is provided with steam heat, electric 
lights, ample parlors, bath rooms and the most improved 
modern conveniences. It is neatly and tastefully furnished 
throughout. A large dining room is in connection with 
the building, with a capacity for eight hundred students. 
The Department of Domestic Economy also is located in 
the building and open to all young women of the College. 
Rooms will be assigned to new students in the order of 
their application. The young women are under the direc- 
tion of an efficient dean of women. 



THE COLLEGE GROUNDS. 



The College domain includes about 840 acres. Of this 
about 125 acres are set apart for college grounds. These 
occupy the high land of the southwest part of the farm, and 
include the campus, shrubbery, plantations, young forestry 
plantations, the flower borders and gardens, with the begin- 
nings of a botanical garden, and the surroundings of the 
processors' dwellings. Gravel drives, cement and gravel 
walks load to all parts of the grounds and to the various 
buildings, and the true principles of landscape gardening 
have boon so faithfully observed in the gardening and in 
the location of buildings and drives as to make of the entire 
Campus a largo and beautiful park. The view of the sur- 
rounding country from the upper stories and towers of the 
Main Building Is one of wide extent and great beauty. 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 
CLASSIFICATION AND GRADING. 
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES OF STUDY AND 

DEGREES. 
POST-GRADUATE COURSES OF STUDY AND 

ADVANCED DEGREES. 



28 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 



ADMISSION TO THE ACADEMIC YEAR. 

YEAR BEGINS SEPTEMBER 1, 1902. 

Candidates for admission to the first term of the 
Academic Year will be required to pass a satisfactory- 
examination in geography, arithmetic, United States his- 
tory, human physiology, algebra to simple equations, orthog- 
raphy, reading, and grammar. The examination in gram- 
mar will cover the following subjects: The eight parts of 
speech, the classification of nouns, pronouns, adjectives, and 
adverbs, the declension of nouns and pronouns, the compar- 
ison of adjectives and adverbs, and the rules of spelling 
that apply in grammatical inflection. For further informa- 
tion see sample examination questions bearing the heading, 
Preparatory Grammar, page 33. Examinations will be made 
on the first and second days of the school year. In lieu of 
these examinations, teachers' certificates or standings from 
accredited schools will be accepted. 

ADMISSION TO SECOND TERM OF ACADEMIC YEAR. 

TERM BEGINS JANUARY 21, 1903. 

Students seeking admission to the second term of the 
Academic Year will need to meet the requirements for 
admission to the first term and in addition thereto, aass 
a satisfactory examination in the studies of that term. 
In lieu of examinations in history and drawing, standings 
of approved high schools will be accepted. No student 
assigned to the algebra of the first term will be allowed to 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 29 

take plane geometry. Graduates of schools included in 
either list of "Accredited Schools" will be accepted without 
examination. 

The examination in algebra will include addition, sub- 
traction, multiplication, division, factoring, highest common 
factor, lowest common multiple, fractions, simple equations 
containing one or more unknown quantities, problems in- 
volving equations of the first degree, and the discussion 
of such equations. The work in algebra should be of a 
grade equal to that of Wentworth's New School or Well's 
Essentials of Algebra. 

The examination in English will cover the entire field 
of grammar, except prosody. In this examination much 
will depend on the candidate's ability to analyze a passage 
of good modern prose, and to punctuate his paper correctly. 
In analyzing he should be prepared to treat phrases and 
clauses as units, and to state the exact function of con- 
junctive words. He should show a ready and accurate 
knowledge of the structure of the prose sentence and the 
relations of its various parts to one another. For further 
information, see the sample examination questions on Ad- 
vanced Grammar, page 34. 

Many students will find it exceedingly desirable to 
begin their work in college in this term. Those who have 
had considerable algebra in the prepatory school should 
review its fundamental principles and become acquainted 
with their application in the wider and more difficult field 
of college work, and those who have had experience in 
plane geometry can to advantage supplement such study by 
a review of some standard text and a thorough drill in the 
original geometric propositions. The classes in these 
studies established at the beginning of the spring term 
furnish an excellent opportunity for students to prepare 
themselves thoroughly for entering upon collegiate work 
at the opening of the next school year. 

In like manner, students who have completed gram- 
mar and have had a high school course in rhetoric have 
an opportunity in this term to review the principles of 



30 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

style and correct whatever errors they still make in ex- 
pressing their thoughts. Without a thorough grounding 
in the principles of style and a considerable degree of 
accuracy in choosing words and constructing sentences, 
also in planning and developing paragraphs, it is practi- 
cally impossible for a student to do creditable work in 
Freshman English. The majority of those who fail in 
English, fail because they are not fully prepared to do 
the work they attempt. In many instances the cause of 
failure is that the student has not been trained to apply 
the principles he has recited; properly directed practice 
in composition is far more important than the mere mem- 
orizing of rules and definitions. To begin work in this 
term would prepare many for a better standing throughout 
their course than would otherwise be possible. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO FRESHMAN 
YEAR. 

YEAR BEGINS SEPTEMBER 1, 1902. 

The requirements for admission to the Freshman Year 
of the agricultural and veterinary courses are about the 
same as those for admission to the College Academic Year, 
except that agricultural freshmen are required to take the 
two courses in Rhetoric, and also that 'such students as 
need the course in grammar are required to take it as 
preparatory work. In order to determine what agricultural 
students should take grammar, an examination will be 
given at the opening of the fall term. 

The requirements for admission to all courses other 
than those in agriculture and veterinary science include, 
in addition to the studies necessary to enter the Academic 
year, standing in the studies of that year. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS IN MATHEMATICS. 

The examination in plane geometry will be upon the 
text used by the student. He Bhould be prepared to demon- 
i rati original exercises. 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 31 

The examination in algebra will cover the following 
subjects: Fundamental operations, including examples 
involving the use of literal, fractional and negative expon- 
ents; parentheses occuring in terms and factors; factor- 
ing; highest common factor and lowest common multiple; 
fractions; equations of the first degree involving one or 
more unknown quantities and problems leading to such 

equations; discussion of the iorms — , — , — , etc.; inequal- 
ities; involution and evolution of algebraic monomials and 
polynomials, including the extraction of the higher roots; 
radicals, including the fundamental operations, rationaliza- 
tion, imaginary quantities, binomial surds and the solution 
of equations containing radicals; pure and affected quadra- 
tics; solution of quadratics by factoring; problems invol- 
ving quadratics; equations solved like quadratics; simultan- 
eous quadratic equations, and theory of quadratics. 
Students who have thoroughly mastered these subjects in 
Wentworth's New School Algebra, Well's Essentials of 
Algebra or text books of an equal grade and who have 
carefully reviewed them preparatory to taking up advanced 
work, ought readily to pass the required examination. 

An idea of the quality of work demanded can be gained 
from the sample examination questions which follow: 

1. From (*— 'y)mn— {a— b) {x-\-y)—Z— 5*2 subtract (2b+ba) 
{x-\-y)~ 8 — (a«+5)*2— ymn. 

2. Multiply— 8a3b-4cr{x—y)—4(m-\-n)c by 7 a$b— 3c {x—y)—i 
(m—n)c. 

3. Resolve 36^2^—81^2—16^2^24-36^2^2 into 4 prime 
factors. 

4. Find the highest common factor of 6a*4— 2«*3 — 2cz*2— 
2ax—8a and 6ax*—Uax3-\-2ax2-{-2ax+8a. 

5. Find the sum of the following and reduce the result to 
simplest form: 

2(1— 3*) 1—2* 2 

(1+*) (1+9*) (1+*) (1+4*) 1+4* 



32 





IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 


6. 


4ab a — 3b — 3c 

THi'tHo 1 1 hv 9 


a 2 -\-b 2 — c* — 'lab a — b — c 


7. 


Solve the equation: 

x— 1 1 ( x— 5 14 - 2x J x—9 7 




4 8(4 5)2 8 




r » 1 

j MX ~\ =1 


8. 


Given -{ ml ^ nc * x anc ^ ^' 




nx-\ =1 | 

l y J 



9. The fore-wheel of a carriage makes 5 revolutions more 
than the hind-wheel in going 50 yards, and if the circumference 
of the fore-wheel were increased by one-tenth, and the circum- 
ference of the hind-wheel by one-fifth, the former would make 
7 revolutions more than the latter in going 198 feet. What is 
the circumference of each wheel? 

10. Expand (— 4<*2;tr-3— yi)— 2. 

11. Find the cube root of 10*3-{-12*5— 1—3*8— 6*2— 12*4 

+*9+3*+6*7— 10*6. 



12. Find the sum of 1 /54am- r -6£3, ^lQa^-m, v /2a4m+9 

6 

and i) l /4a2m, 

13. Divide la'-b-y/a'tbc by ab\/ ab^cS. 



14. Find the cube root 



f a la 
° f 3^3 



3 

15. Find the square root of the binomial surd, (#-f£)2— 4 
(a -b) x/ab. 

16. Divide t/48"-/ - 12by — V -6. 

91 

17. Solve the equation: 1 /3*+ 1 /3*+13 = 



1 /3*+13. 



IX. A man traveled by coach (5 miles, and returned on 
foot at a rate of 5 miles an hour less than that of the coach. He 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 33 

was fifty minutes longer in returning than in going. What was 
the rate of the coach? 

( xy-\-2$xy— 480=0 
19. Solve the equations: \ 

( 2x-ry=n. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS IN ENGLISH. 

The applicant should show thorough preparation in 
English, including grammar and elementary rhetoric, and 
not over-looking spelling, reading, and punctuation. A 
student who spells poorly will be conditioned in English 
courses until he is able to spell with comparative accuracy. 
The applicant should understand the words in current use 
in good modern prose, and should be able to read aloud 
with that ease and fluency that betoken a correct under- 
standing of what he reads. His knowledge of grammar 
should enable him to classify words according to their 
grammatical properties, to give their inflections and to 
identify each form, to analyze in detail sentences of modern 
prose, and, above all, to construct sentences correctly. He 
should have given sufiicient study to punctuation to enable 
him to use the marks correctly in his own compositions. 
His knowledge of rhetoric is best tested, not by his read- 
iness to give definitions, but rather oy his ability to apply 
his knowledge of rhetorical principles in his own speech 
and composition. His speech should be free from gross 
errors and awkward constructions, and he should be able 
to write with a fair degree, not only of correctness, but also 
of ease. For such training, more depends upon the teacher 
than upon the text-book, but the method pursued in a book 
like Scott and Denney's "Composition-knetoric" is likely 
in general to produce the best results. 

An idea of the extent and nature of the ground covered 
may be gained from the following set of sample examina- 
tion questions in English: 

PREPARATORY GRAMMAR. 

(For admission to the first term of the Academic Year). 
I. (a) Decline /, it, lady, dog, Charles. 



34 IOWA .STATE COLLEGE. 

(b) Compare noisy, ill, remarkable. 

(c) Write the principal parts of go, see, ride, sleep, 
try. 

II. Define (a) proper noun, (b) personal pronoun, (c) 
descriptive adjective, (d) intransitive verb, (e) passive 
voice, (f) subordinate conjunction. 

III. Name the different kinds of nouns, of adjectives, 
and of pronouns, and give an example of each. 

IV. In the following sentence tell what part of speech 
each word is: "The deacon did not stop to speak to her, 
but after a moment's thought placed the precious wallet 
under the pillows." 

V. Analyze this sentence: "This act was followed by 
another moment's reflection, and as the old man turned, 
his son stood before him in the doorway." 

VI. Parse the italicized words: "These are not my 
books. I think they must belong to some of the boys. What 
boys have been here since I left." 

ADVANOKD GRAMMAR. 

(For admission to the second term of the Academic 
Year). 

I. Conjugate strike in the present perfect, past, and 
past perfect tenses of the indicative mood, passive voice. 

II. Define (a) personal pronoun, (b) demonstrative 
adjective, (c) abstract noun, (d) impersonal verb, (e) 
active voice, (f) indirect object, (g) attribute compliment. 

III. (a) Name the principal uses of the subjunctive 
mood. (1)) How does it differ in form from the indicative? 

IV. (a) Decline martyr, baby, ox. 

(b) Compare lazy, industrious, ill. 
(C) Give the principal parts of throw, lie, lay, sit, 
set, and ride. 

V. Distinguish between shall and will in (a) the first 
•i, (l») the third person. 

VI. Parse the Italicized words: "No man ever loved 
more than Stanley to look facts in the face, ami to know the 
exact and certain truth. 'Let us be firmly persuaded,' he 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDEJNTS. 35 

wrote, that error is more easily eradicated by establishing 
truth and darkness most permanently displaced by diffusing 
light' " 

VII. In the following sentences state what each phrase 
modifies and how: "There is no clearer illustration of this 
love of light than in his eager and impassioned insistence 
that the revision of the translation of the Bible should have 
the help of all the best scholarship of England, in whatever 
creed or church it might be found." Also point out all the 
modifiers of insistence. 

VIII. In the following sentence state the office of each 
clause, and point out the subject, verb, and complement of 
each: "It is a duty which the people, by the constitution 
itself, have imposed on the state legislatures, and which 
they might have left to be performed elsewhere, if they 
had seen fit." 

IX. Punctuate: "I would not perplex a young mind 
with punctuation as a system or with nice questions be- 
tween semicolons and colons but every one should at an 
early age be taught the difference between ihe period and 
the comma and the principal functions of each every one 
should be taught too the great principle that a point serves 
as a guide to the construction and through the construc- 
tion to the meaning of the sentence." 

X. Read your paper through to see that it is punct- 
uated correctly. 

ELEMENTARY RHETORIC. 

(For admission to the first term of the Freshman Year). 

1. In the following sentence, (a) state the exact gram- 
matical office of each phrase; (b) parse the italicized words; 
(c) account for the punctuation: "During the first half 
century of our national life we seemed to have succeeded in 
an extraordinary degree in approaching our ideal, in organ- 
izing a nation for counsel and co-operation, and in moving 
forward with cordial unison and with confident and buoyant 



36 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

step toward the accomplishment of tasks and duties upon 
which all were agreed." 

II. Correct the following sentences, and explain the 
correction: 

1. John writes as well or better than Henry. 

2. Tom was laying on the floor when I come in. 

3. He haint got nothing to worry about. 

4. If I was him I would of done it long ago. 

III. Discuss fully and carefully four of the following 
topics: 

1. The practical value of rhetoric. 

2. The essential qualities of the paragraph. 

3. The respective advantages of the short sentence, 
the long sentence, and the periodic sentence. 

4. Define purity, propriety, and precision, and state 
why each should be observed. 

5. The topic sentence; what it is, its position, its 
value. 

IV. Write an essay of from 250 to 350 words on two 
of the following topics: 

1. My reasons for desiring a college education. 

2. A striking contrast — persons, places, or things. 

3. A trying experience. 

4. A visit to . 

Note— Those essays are considered an important part of the 
examination. They will be graded mainly on diction, sentence 
structure and connection, and paragraphing. Good penmanship, 
neatness of manuscript, and correct spelling and punctuation 
are also important. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS IN HISTORY. 

For admission to the work in history for the First 
Term of the Academic Year the student is expected to pass 
a satisfactory examination in United States history. Stand- 
ings from accredited schools are accepted in lieu of this 
examination. 

For admission to the work in history for the Second 
Term of the Academic Year, standings in general history 
from accredited high schools are accepted in lieu of an 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 37 

examination on the work in history for the First Term 
of the Academic Year. 

Standings from high schools are not accepted in lieu 
of the work in history for the Second Term of the Acade- 
mic Year except from such high schools as give a separate 
course in English history. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS IN FREE-HAND 
DRAWING. 

For admission to the First term of the Academic Year 
no previous work in drawing is required. 

The standings of students from high schools giving 
courses in free-hand drawing may be accepted in lieu of 
the work in free-hand drawing for the First Term of the 
Academic year. 

The work in free-hand drawing of the second term of 
the Academic Year (for engineering students only) will 
be required of all entering engineering students who can- 
not demonstrate proficiency in sketching parts of machines 
and a knowledge of the principles of projection and of 
dimensioning, and facility in plain free-hand lettering. 

EXAMINATION AT HOME. 

The heads of the English and Mathematical depart- 
ments will cheerfully unite with principals of schools in 
arranging for such examinations in grammar, rhetoric, 
algebra, and geometry as will admit students to our fresh- 
man class. Candidates can arrange also to have questions 
for examination sent to county superintendents or other 
school officers who are willing to conduct the examination. 
The papers will be forwarded to the heads of the English 
and Mathematical departments, who will mark the same 
and notify the applicant of the record received. 

The attention of applicants for admission is particu- 
larly called to this arrangement, by which all their entrance 
examinations can be taken at a convenient place near home. 



38 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

ADMISSION ON DIPLOMA. 

SCHOOLS FULLY ACCREDITED. 

The following list of accredited schools has been pre- 
pared by the Committee on College Entrance Requirements 
appointed by the State Teachers' Association. The atten- 
tion of secondary schools is called to the fact that begin- 
ning with this year each school to be accredited must have 
at least three teachers devoting their time exclusively to 
high school work. A full and complete list of all the rules 
governing the accrediting of high schools and the state- 
ment of how a high school may become accredited may be 
found on pages 129 to 133 of the High School Manual issued 
by the last State Teachers' Association. Copies of this book 
may be had free of charge on application to State Superin- 
tendent R. C. Barrett, Des Moines. The graduates of fully 
accredited schools will be admitted to the first term of the 
Freshman Year upon the presentation of a diploma showing 
that the candidate has completed one of the long courses. 
The students thus admitted will take review work in 
English and algebra during the first ten days of the term. 
For requirements in history see "Entrance Requirements in 
History" page 36. 

In English this work will be a series of written exer- 
cises designed to test the student's abilty to express his 
thoughts clearly and correctly. In grading these exercises 
the points that will be considered include spelling, punct- 
uation, diction, sentence structure from the grammatical 
and also the rhetorical standpoint, and paragraph struc- 
ture This test is designed as a practical one, not as a 
review of mere theory: memorized rules and definitions 
n ill count for little; readiness in applying them is the real 
>' I A Btudent whose sentences are notably incorrect 
needs further drill in grammar; one whose paragraphing 
shows no definite plan needs additional practice in elemen- 
composil Ion. 

in algebra all subjects up to and Including quadratics 
will I-'- treated and the ability of the student to demon- 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 



39 



strate principles and solve examples and problems will be 
tested. 

At the close of this review students will be assigned 
to such work in English and mathematics as the professors 
in charge of these departments shall consider them fitted 
to undertake. Credits in these branches will be given only 
as students complete the respective courses set forth in 
the detailed statement of the work of these departments. 
A review of one week in plane geometry will be given at 
the beginning of the second term and assignments in 
geometry made in accordance therewith. 

SCHOOLS FULLY ACCREDITED. 



Ackley, 

Adel, 

Alma, 

Algona, 

Ames, 

Anamosa, 

AtJantic, 

A\oca, 

Bedford, 

Belle Plaine, 

Boone, 

Britt, 

Brooklyn, 

Burlington, 

Capital Park, 

Carroll, 

Cedar Falls, 

Cedar Rapids, 

Cedar Valley Sem., Osage, 

Centervnle, 

Charles City, 

Charles City College Prop., 

Cherokee, 

Ciarinda, 

Clarion, 



Clinton, 

Columbus Junction, 

Corning, 

Corydon, 

Council Bluffs, 

Cresco, 

Creston, 

Davenport, 

Decorah, 

Decorah Institute, 

Denison Normal School, 

Denison, 

Des Moines, E., 

Des Moines, N., 

i jos Moines, W., 

Dexter Normal School, 

Dubuque, 

Eagle Crove, 

Eldora, 

Emmetsburg, 

Epworth Seminary, 

Estherville, 

Fairfield, 

Forest City, 

Ft. Dodge, 



40 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Ft. Madison, 

Geneseo, 111., 

Glenwood, 

Greene, 

Greenfield, 

Grinnell, 

Guthrie Center, 

Guthrie County, 

Hamburg, 

Hampton, 

Harlan, 

Humboldt, 

Ida Grove, 

Independence, 

Iowa City, 

Iowa City Academy, 

Iowa Falls, 

Jefferson, 

Keokuk, 

Knoxville, 

Lake City, 

Lamoni, 

Le Mars, 

Leon, 

Lyons, 

Manchester, 

Maquoketa, 

x\Iarengo, 

Marion, 

Marshalltown, 

Mason City, 

McGregor, 

Michigan Military Academy, 

Missouri Valley, 

Moline, 111., 

Montezuma, 

Monticello, 

Mount Ayr, 



Muscatine, 

Nashua, 

Nevada, 

New Hampton, 

Newton, 

Odebolt, 

Onawa, 

Osage, 

Osceola, 

Oskaloosa, 

Ottumwa, 

Parkersburg, 

Perry, 

Red Oak, 

Reinbeck, 

Rockford, 

Rock Rapids, 

Sac City Institute, 

Sanborn, 

Sheldon, 

Shenandoah, 

Sibley, 

Sigourney, 

Sioux City, 

Spencer, 

Storm Lake, 

Stewart, 

Taylorville Twp., 

Taylorville, 111., 

Tipton, 

Traer, 

Villisca, 

Vinton, 

Washington, 

Washington Academy, 

Waterloo, E., 

Waterloo, W., 

Waverly, 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 



41 



Waukon, Wilton, 

Webster City, Wilton-German-English Coll. 

Whittier College, Woodbine Normal School. 

Williamsburg, 

SCHOOLS NOT FULLY ACCREDITED. 
The following list of schools not fully accredited has 
been prepared by the Committee of the State Teachers' 
Association. Graduates of these schools will be admitted 
to the review work of the second term of the Academic 
Year on presentation of a diploma showing that the candi- 
date has completed one of the long courses. 

LIST OF SCHOOLS NOT FULLY ACCREDITED. 



Adair, 

Allerton, 

Anita, 

Audubon, 

Bloomfield, 

Brighton, 

Calhoun Co. Normal School, 

Chariton, 

Charter Oak, 

Clearfield, 

Cedar Lake, 

Colfax, 

Coon Rapids, 

Correctionville, 

De Witt 

Dysart, 

Eldon. 

Elkader, 

Exira, 

Farmington, 

Fayette, 

Fonda, 

Fontanelle, 

Garner, 

Glidden, 

Grand Junction, 



Grundy Center, 

Hartley, 

Hawarden Normal School, 

Holstein, 

Hubbard, 

Keosauqua, 

Kingsley, 

L«ake Mills, 

Lime Springs, 

Manning, 

Mapleton, 

Mechanicsville, 

Milton, 

Morning Sun, 

Moulton, 

Mount Pleasant, 

Neola, 

New Sharon, 

Nora Springs Seminary, 

North English, 

Northwood, 

Oak Park, 

Oelwein, 

Orange City, 

Pella, 

Riceville, 



42 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Richland, State Center, 

Rolfe, Tabor, 

Sac City, Tama City, 

St. Ansgar's Seminary, Victor, 

Shelby, Wapello, 

Sioux Rapids, West Union, 

Springdale, Winfield, 
Springville, 

HOW TO ENTER THE COLLEGE. 

Persons who desire to enter the College as new students 
should comply with the following directions: 

1. Comply with the "Requirements for Admission" on 
pages immediately preceding this. Then write to the Pres- 
ident, asking for a "Card of Inquiry." 

2. On receiving the card write an answer opposite 
each question and mail the card to the President. If the 
answers you give accord with the "Requirements of Admis- 
sion," a card of introductiton will be sent you, which en- 
titles you to admission on passing the examination, or pre- 
senting your diploma. 

3. If you desire to room in a college building write 
to the Steward of the Iowa State College, enclosing $3.00 
to retain a room, and ask for its number, dimensions, etc., 
that you may bring proper carpet and furniture, or pur- 
chase here. 

4. If you desire to room in a college building, when 
you arrive at the College proceed at once to the Steward's 
Office Id Margaret Hall. Register your name and secure 
the key to your room. 

Next see the College Treasurer in his office just south 
or the Main Building, make the required deposit for room 
and board and taking his receipt therefor, which receipt to- 
gether With your card of introduction should be imme- 
diately presented to the President in his office in the same 
building for your entrance and classification. If you have 
.'i diploma, present it at this time. 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 43 

5. Present the card of classification to each of the 
teachers having charge of the classes to which you are 



6. If you desire a room in private family outside ol 
the college buildings indicate this by letter to Mr. J. F. 
Cavell, the Steward, Ames, Iowa, and on your arrival at the 
College the Reception Committee or Steward will direct you 
to your location. 

THE CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS. 

A student who fails to secure the required pass-mark'" 
in any study must make up that study before it is taken 
by the next college class, or classify hack with the class 
in this study. If his mark is below 2.75 on a scale of 4.00 
in an Academic or Freshman study or below 3.00 in a 
Sophomore, Junior or Senior study, he will not be permitted 
to make up the work by himself, but must take it over again 
with the next class. 

To enable students to make up back studies, such ex- 
aminations as may be necessary will be held during the 
first full calendar week of each term. At the beginning 
of the year in September, no student can classify for pro- 
motion with his class until he has passed a satisfactory 
examination in all studies but one "five hour study," and 
that study must be passed by the end of the first week 
of the next term. 

STUDENTS' EXPENSES AND EQUIPMENT. 

No charge is made for tuition to Iowa students. To 
those who come from outside the state $24.00 tuition per 
year is charged. 

The current expenses of students during the year are 
as follows: 

Every student entering College shall, before being 
classified, pay a — 

Janitor fee of $5.00 



♦The pass-mark for Academic and Freshman studies is 3.00 
on a scale of 4.00. For Sophomore, Junior and Senior studies 
the pass-mark is 3.25. 



44 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

In the Main College Building, Margaret Hall and 

Creamery — 

Lighting, heating and incidentals, per week. . .55 

Room rent, per term 3.00 

♦Hospital fee, per term 2.50 

In the Cottages — 

Fuel, lighting and incidentals, per week 40 

Room rent, per term 3.00 

♦Hospital fee, per term 2.50 

As security for the payment of bills, students living 
in the College buildings are required to deposit 
with the Treasurer . . '. $10.00 

These deposits will be returned on final settlement at 
the close of term. 

All bills for each month must, without fail, be settled 
at the Treasurer's office by the second Saturday of the 
month following. 

Students using laboratories in the various departments 
of the College are required to make deposits at the begin- 
ning of each term to cover expenses of breakage, etc., thus 
incurred and the professors in charge require the Treas- 
urer's receipt for such deposits before admitting the 
students to laboratory practice. 

For amounts of such deposits see department courses. 

Students purchasing Military uniforms will deposit 
$5.00 with the merchant tailor at the time measures are 
taken paying the remainder on delivery. 

For heating, lighting, cleaning and care of the college 
buildings students pay less than the items actually cost 
the institution. Injury to college property, of whatever 
sort, is charged to the author, when known; otherwise 
to the section or to the entire body of students, as may 
Mem just in the given case. 

Students who board in any of the college buildings 
furnish their own bedding and all furniture for their rooms, 
excepting bedsteads, washstanus, tables and wardrobes. 

*s< •<■ terxni of Hospital Department, page 46. 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 45 

Each student rooming in a college building will pro- 
vide himself with the following articles: 

1 Chair. 

1 Looking-glass. 

1 Wash-basin and ewer. 

1 ^op-pail. 

6 Towels. 

4 Table napkins. 

6 Sheets — for single bed. 

3 Pillow cases. 

Pillow and mattress as may be desired. 

Bed clothes (blankets or comfortables) as required. 

Students are earnestly advised to bring from home, 
carpets, etc., to make their rooms comfortable and cheerful. 
Male students in the two lower classes, not physically dis- 
abled, are required by law to take the military drill and 
purchase uniforms therefor. "Physical disability" must be 
certified to by the College Physician, on examination. 

Text books and stationery may be purchased at the 
College Book Store, at about twenty-five per cent below the 
average retail price. 

COLLEGE HOSPITAL. 

; 

The actual sanitary condition of the College is excel- 
lent. The buildings are situated on high ground with good 
natural drainage. The water supply is exceptionally pure 
and abundant. 

The sewer system and sewage disposal plant are the 
best that modern sanitary engineering can devise. Never- 
theless, in this, as in other like institutions, whose students 
are drawn from a wide territory, various diseases are 
brought here by the students themselves. In order to con- 
trol epidemics and properly care for other cases of illness 
or injury among the students of the College a neat and 
commodious hospital building is provided. This building is 
heated by furnaces, lighted by gas, and has perfect sanitary 
plumbing. This hospital is under the charge of the College 



46 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Physician assisted by a professional nurse and a competent 
house-keeper. 

The expenses of the hospital are defrayed from a fund 
accruing from hospital fees paid by students. 

The hospital fee insures to the payer thereof medical 
attendance, nursing and medicine in illness or accident and 
consultation and medicine for minor ailments, in accordance 
with the regulations published below. 

The privileges of the hospital are also extended to 
students not rooming in the college buildings, provided, 1st 
that no calls shall be made by the Physician at their resi- 
dence, and 2nd, that the usual hospital fee is made within 
the first ten days of the term. The hospital has proved to 
be a great blessing to the students and the insurance is 
placed at actual cost. 

The following regulations apply to the privileges of 
the hospital: 

1st. The hospital fee for the term is fixed at $2.50, 
and is required of all students living in college buildings. 

2nd. Students entering the hospital shall be charged 
$3.00 per week for board, fires and lights. No other charges 
on these accounts shall be made by the College during the 
time the student is in the hospital. 

3rd. For any time in excess of three consecutive weeks 
per term spent in the hospital an additional charge above 
that mentioned, shall be made of $4.00 per week. 

4th. In case a special nurse or physician is employed 
the expense shall be borne by the particular patient. The 
selection of such physician or nurse to be approved by the 
College Physician. 

5th. Students not making the hospital deposit will be 
admitted to all the privileges of the hospital allowed 
students making the deposit upon the basis of a charge of 
$io.(M) per week. 

6th. The College Physician is authorized to exclude 
from Hi" college dormitories and recitation rooms any per- 
son afflicted with a contagious disease. 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 47 

7th. The privileges of the hospital shall not be ex- 
tended to cases of small-pox. 

8th. The College assumes no responsibility whatever 
and the hospital fee of $2.50 does not provide for medical 
attendance, nurses, medicine or other expenses incurred 
in treating or caring for students afflicted with small-pox. 

9th. The President and College Physician shall require 
of students entering College a certificate of a reputable 
physician showing a successful vaccination. 

10th. The charges named are based upon the probable 
actual cost of medical attendance and hospital service and 
the fund created will be carefully devoted to those purposes. 
The College can not assume any liability beyond the extent 
of the fund so created. 

MANUAL LABOR. 

SHOP LABORATORY AND FIELD PRACTICE. 

The following regulations in regard to manual labor 
have been adopted by the Board of Trustees: 

1. The manual labor of students is divided into two 
kinds, viz.: Uninstructive labor, which shall be paid for 
in money, and instructive labor, which shall be compen- 
sated by the instruction given and the skill required. 

2. Uninstructed labor shall comprise all the opera- 
tions in the workshop, the garden, upon the farm and else- 
where, in which the work done accrues to the benefit of the 
College, and not to that of the student. Instructive labor 
shall embrace all those operations in the workshop, museum, 
laboratories, veterinary hospital, experimental kitchen, 
upon the farm, garden and experimental stations,in which 
the sole purpose is the acquisition of knowledge and skill. 

3. Students shall engage in instructive labor in the 
presence and under the instruction of the professor in 
charge according to the statement made in each of the 
courses of study. 

The compensated labor furnished by the Divisions of 
Agriculture, Veterinary Medicine and of Engineering, is 



48 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

given by each to its own students, and is eagerly sought. 
The "details" of compensated labor supplied by th^ needs 
of the various departments are given to trie most faithful 
and meritorious students in each department. Uninstruc- 
tive labor is paid for according to its value to the College, 
but no student should expect to pay the main part of his 
expenses by labor while here. The College cannot furnish 
the work, and even if it could, the student's time is chiefly 
needed for study. Still, many worthy and industrious 
students pay a considerable part of their expenses by labor, 
over $3,000 being paid out by the College thus each year 
to students and post-graduate assistants. 

GOVERNMENT. 

The relations of our college buildings, and the nature 
of the exercises, complicated as they are, by laboratory 
work, shop practice and labor, make order, punctuality 
and systematic effort indispensable. This institution, 
therefore, offers no inducement to the idler or self-indulgent. 
All who are too independent to submit to needful authority, 
or too reckless to accept wholesome restraint, are not ad- 
vised to come. The discipline of the College is confined 
mainly to sending away promptly those who prove on fair 
trial to be of the said class. 

The use of tobacco by students on the college premises 

is forbidden. Those who are already so addicted to its 

at they cannot cheerfully submit to this regulation 

are advised not to come. Of course the use of intoxicating 

beverages and of profane and obscene language is forbidden. 

PUBLIC WORSHIP. 

Officers and students gather daily in the chapel at 7:00 

p. if., for public worship, except on Wednesday, when the 

time from 7:00 to 1:'M) p. m., is devoted to Y. M. and Y. W. 

and on Sat in-day, when there are no college 

On Sunday morning at 10:45 a discourse is 

given in the chapel by a clergyman invited for the occasion. 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 49 

The object of these services is to emphasize and enforce 
the principles of morality and of the Christian religion. 
Being a state institution we give the utmost treedom to all 
creeds and forms of belief, avoiding the controversies of 
sectarianism. 

The faculty requires on Sundays such conduct and 
decorum in and about the college buildings as befit the 
observance of the Sabbath. 

RELIGIOUS ASSOCIATIONS. 

The Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciations of the College are voluntary organizations, com- 
posed of students and members of the faculty. The mem- 
bership is large. The Sunday school, Bible classes and 
prayer meetings are under their direction, and are well 
attended and profitable. This voluntary Christian influence 
in the College is strong and healthful. 

LITERARY AND TECHNICAL SOCIETIES. 

Seven excellent literary societies hold their meetings 
each Saturday evening, and serve to supplement the literary 
work of the College. On that ground they are recognized 
by the College, given rooms and an entire evening each 
week, free from study or other exercises. Every student 
is advised to join one of these societies. 

There is a Veterinary Society, an Economic Association 
and an Agricultural and Horticultural Association, in the 
exercises of which members of the faculty and students 
interested take part. In addition most of the departments 
carry on seminar work. 

COURSES OF STUDY. 

Eight courses of study, leading to the following degrees 
are offered: 

1. The course in Agriculture, of four years leads to 
the degree of Bachelor of Scientific Agriculture, (B. S. A.) 

2. The course in Veterinary Medicine, of three years 



50 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

leads to the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, (D. 
V. M.) 

3. The course in Mechanical Engineering, of four 
years leads to the degree of Bachelor of Mechanical Engl 
neering, (B. M. E.) 

4. The course in Civil Engineering, of four years leads 
to the degree of Bachelor of Civil Engineering, (B. C. E.) 

5. The course in Electrical Engineering, of four years 
leaas to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Electrical 
Engineering, (B. Sc. in E. E.) 

6. The course in Mining Engineering, of four years 
leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Mining 
Engineering, (B. Sc. in Mn. E.) 

7. The course in Technology, of four years leads to 
the degree of Bachelor of Science, (B. Sc.) 

8. The course in Science as Related to the Industries, 
ol four years leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science, 
(B. Sc.) 

9. The course in General and Domestic Science, for 
women, of four years leads to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science, (B. Sc.) Ladies may take any other course 
desired. 

For the short courses in Agriculture and Dairying 
certificates properly indicating the completion of certain 
studies will he given. 

For the short courses in Mining and Ceramics, certifi- 
cates will be given. 

SPECIAL LINES OF STUDY. 

Any person of mature age and good moral character 
Who desires to pursue : Indies in any department of instruc- 
tion of tlie College, and who is not a candidate for a degree, 
will, upon application to the President, be admitted upon 
tin following conditions: (1). He must meet the require- 
for admission to the Freshman class, and pass such 
special examinations as the professor in charge of the 
department selected shall deem essential to a profitable 
pun uit of the work. (2). He shall confine his work strictly 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 51 

to the line of study chosen at the time of admission, and 
shall take enough class work, laboratory and other practice 
equivalent to work required of regularly classified students. 
(3). He shall submit to the same requirements in daily 
recitations and examinations, with students in the regular 
courses. 

Students who have pursued thus a special line of study 
in tae institution, will, upon application to the faculty, be 
granted the College certificate showing their standing in 
such studies. 

GRADUATING THESES. 

The subjects of theses shall be selected under direction 
of the professor in whose department they are written, and 
submitted to the Thesis Committee, with signed approval 
of the Professor, on or before the first Monday in October. 

It is expected that each thesis shall represent an 
amount of work equivalent to at least one exercise per 
week through the Senior Year; that it shall show the result 
of the student's personal study or investigation and be 
throughout original in matter and treatment so far as the 
nature of the subject will permit; that it shall be prepared 
under the supervision of the professor in charge, the 
student making frequent reports of progress and having an 
outline of matter ready for approval by the first week of 
the last term. 

The thesis, reaay for examination and marking, with its 
specific title and the written approval of the professor in 
charge, shall be presented to the Thesis Committee at a 
date fixed by the committee during the four weeks preceding 
the Commencement Day. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING. 

Graduate and undergraduate students of other colleges 
will be admitted and granted such credits as their work 
will justify. Work of recognized merit that has been taken 
at colleges or universities of good rank ana standing will 
be credited for an equivalent amount of work so far as it 



52 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

applies in any of the courses offered at this college. Students 
taking up work in this way will consult the heads of de- 
partments to ascertain the credits to be allowed; these 
credits may at the option of the head of the department be 
conditioned on satisfactory work during the student's first 
term in College. 

POST GRADUATE DEGREES. 

The degrees which are conferred by the faculty in con- 
nection with the post-graduate courses of study offered by 
the various departments of the College are as follows: 

1. The degree of Master of Science (M. Sc.) is open 
to Bachelors of Science who are graduates of the Course 
in Science of this College. 

2. The degree of Master of Scientific Agriculture (M. 
S. A.) is open to graduates of the Four Years' Course in 
Agriculture of this College. 

3. The degree of Mechanical Engineer (M. E.) is open 
to Bachelors of Mechanical Engineering, and to Bachelors 
of Science before 1878, who are graduates of the Mechanical 
Engineering Department of this College. 

4. The degree of Civil Engineer (C. E.) is open to 
Bachelors of Civil Engineering and to Bachelors of Science 
before 1878, who are graduates of the Civil Engineering 
Department of this College. 

DIBECTI0N8 TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 

The Faculty will recommend for the above degrees 
candidates otherwise qualified who shall comply with the 
regulations given below. 

The opportunity of resident Btudy after graduation is a 
privilege granted only upon recommendation of the Presi- 
denl and the Professor In charge of the studies to be pur- 
sued, and only to students whose; conduct and scholarship in 
College seem to warrant the granting of the privilege. 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 53 

REGULATIONS FOR THE SELECTION OF STUDIES AND CONDITIONS 
FOR GRANTING POST-GRADUATE DEGREES. 

I. No undergraduate course of study can be selected 
for a major post-graduate. The minor study shall be 
approved by the Committee on Post-Graduate Studies and 
the Professor in charge of the study. 

II. The major and minor subject shall be related in 
such a manner as to support and strengthen one another. 

III. The major course of study must be of the nature 
of original research, original in the sense that it is to be 
independent work covering a field not thoroughly investi- 
gated before, to include, however, whatever may be neces- 
sary in the way of comparing various methods of investi- 
gation. 

IV. The minor course to be left to the discretion of 
the Professor giving the course. 

V. The major and minor subjects while they must 
be closely related, must be taken in different departments. 

VI. The length of time which a student must devote 
to his studies is one year. To the major subject there 
must be given two-thirds and to the minor one-third of the 
time. 

VII. Between the Bachelor's degree and the Post- 
Graduate degree there shall intervene at least two years, of 
which one year (the second preferred) shall be wholly 
devoted to resident study at this institution, and the first 
year to work in the chosen line, either in teaching, in 
studying, or in professional work. 

VIII. Grauates of other institutions desiring to be- 
come candidates for Post-Graduate degrees in this institu- 
tion shall be required to show to the Committee on Post- 
Graduate study evidence of undergraduate work equivalent 
to the corresponding course in this institution, or if any 
deficiency appear, to make up such deficiency. 

IX. Applications for post-graduate work shall be made 
to the Faculty by those who may desire to pursue such a 
course of study at this institution and such applications 
should be outlined in both subjects, major and minor 



54 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

studies, by the professors under whom the course of study 
is to be taken. The student should also thoroughly under- 
stand the course of study outlined for him so that he can 
begin and continue his work with a definite object in view. 
The application and the outline of study must be submitted 
to the professor in charge of the department in which the 
study is taken and approved by him before it is presented 
to the Faculty. 

X. Eacn candidate or the degree of Master of Science 
shall be required to present to the college library one 
hundred printed copies of his thesis, such copies to be 
designated by serial number in such manner as shall be 
required by the Thesis Committee. 

XL As a condition for the granting of an advanced 
degree each candidate must have a reading knowledge of 
French or German. 

XII. Bach resident student must apply in writing for 
examination at least six weeks before the annual meeting 
of the Board of Trustees, stating explicitly the subject in 
which he desires to be examined, and at the time of the 
examination (which may be four weeks before the meeting 
of the Board) he must present to the Faculty his final 
thesis. 

Instruction and opportunities for advanced study are 
given in the following branches to post-graduate students 
provided that undergraduate work shall not qualify a 
student for a Post-Graduate degree: 

1. Practical Agriculture, major or minor in 

(a) Field Crops. 

(b) Farm Management. 

(c) Drainage. 

2. Dairying, major or minor in 
(:\) Butter Making. 
(1)) Cheese Making. 
(c) Farm Dairying. 
(<D Dairy Bacteriology. 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 55 

3. Animal Husbandry, major or minor in 

(a) Study of Breeds. 

(b) Stock Judging. 

(c) Practical Management of Stock. 

(d) Feeds and Feeding. 

(e) Heredity. 

4. Horticulture, major or minor in 

(a) Pomology. 

(b) Olericulture. 

(c) Forestry. 

5. Agricultural Chemistry, major or minor in 

(a) Organic Agricultural Chemistry. 

(b) Inorganic Agricultural Chemistry. 

6. Veterinary Medicine. 

7. Mechanical Engineering, major or minor in 

(a) Advanced Machine Design. 

(b) Advanced Experimental Engineering. 

8. Civil Engineering, major or minor in 

(a) Framed Structures. 

(b) Sanitary Engineering. 

(c) Water Works Engineering. 

9. Electrical Engineering, major or minor in 

(a) Theory of Alternating Currents. 

(b) Electrical Design. 

10. Physics, major or minor in 

Theoretical and Experimental Physics. 

11. Chemistry, major or minor in 

(a) Inorganic Chemistry. 

(b) Organic Chemistry. 



56 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

12. Botany, major in 

(a) Cytology. 

(b) Systematic Botany. 

(c) Morphology. 
Minor in 

(a) Economic Botany. 

(b) Mycology. 

(c) Bacteriology. 

13. Zoology, major or minor in 

(a) Vertebrate Morphology. 

(b) Entomology, Economic or Systematic. 

14. Domestic Science. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 



PRACTICAL AGRICULTURE. 

DAIRYING. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. 

HORTICULTURE. 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY. 



58 TOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



W. M. BEARDSHEAR, LL. D., President. 
President. 

*JAMES WILSON, M. S. A., 



CHARLES P. CURTISS, B. Sc, M. S. A., 
Director of Experiment Station and Professor of Agriculture. 

**J. L. BUDD, M. H., 
Professor Emeritus in Horticulture. 

JULIUS BUEL WEEMS, Ph. D., 
Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. 

W. J. KENNEDY, B. S. A., 

Professor of Animal Husbandry and Vice Director of Experi- 
ment Station. 

GEORGE LEWIS McKAY, 
Professor of Dairying. 



Professor of Agronomy. 

HOMER C. PRICE, M. S. A., 
Professor of Horticulture and Forestry. 

FRANK W. BOUSKA, B. S. A., 
Instructor in Dairy Bacteriology. 

JOSEPH J. EDGERTON, B. AG., 
Enstructor In Agricultural Physics and Farm Foreman. 

ARTHUR T. ERWIN, B. S., 

Instructor in Horticulture. 

C. LARSON, B. S. A., 
Instructor In Dairying. 



inted Indefinite leave of absence as Secretary of Agricul- 
t tire. 

•Resigned, I December, IK98. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE. 59 

E. C. MYERS, B. S. A., 
Instructor in Agricultural Chemistry. 

EDWARD E. LITTLE, M. S. A., 

Assistant in Horticulture. 

F. R. MARSHALL, B. S. A., 

Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 

EDGAR WILLIAM STANTON, M. So., 
Professor of Mathematics and Economic Science. 

M. STALKER, V. S., 
Lecturer in Veterinary Science. 

GEN, JAMES RUSH LINCOLN. 
Professor of Military Science. 

LOUIS HERMAN PAMMEL, B. AG., M. Sc, Fit. D., 

Professor of Botany. 

GEORGE WELTON BISSELL, M. E., 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

ANSON MARSTON, C. E., 
Professor of Civil Engineering. 

MISS LIZZIE MAY ALLIS, M. A., 
Professor of French and German. 

LOUIS BEVIER SPINNEY, B. M. E., M. Sc, 
Professor of Physics. 

SAMUEL WALKER BEYER, B. Sc, Ph. D., 
Professor of Geology. 

ALVIN B. NOBLE, B. Ph., 
Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature. 

HENRY E. SUMMERS, B. S., 

Professor of Zoology. 

ADRIAN M. NEWENS, B. O., 
Professor of Elocution and Associate in English. 

JOHN J. REPP, V. M. D., 

Professor of Pathology and Therapeutics. 

ORANGE HOWARD CESSNA, A. M., D. D., 
Professor of History and Philosophy. 



60 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

JOHN H. M'NEALL, V. M. D., 
Professor of Anatomy and Surgery. 

CARL W. GAY, D. V. M„ 

Professor of Veterinary Medicine and Sanitary Science. 

TALBOT LENNOX, 
Instructor in Dairy Machinery. 

EZRA C. POTTER, 
Instructor in "Wood Work. 

EDWIN CLARK BOUTELLE, B. M. E. 
Instructor in Forge Work. 

MISS BESSIE B. LARRABEE, A. B., 
Instructor in Latin and English. 

ERNEST ALANSON PATTENGILL, B. S., 
Instructor in Mathematics. 

E. B. TUTTLE, B. Sc. in E. E., 

Instructor in Physics. 

MISS ESTELLA PADDOCK, 
Instructor in Botany. 

MISS HELEN G. REED, Ph. B., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS ELIZABETH MACLEAN, M. Di., 
Instructor in English. 

JOSEPH E. GUTHRIE, M. S., 
Instructor in Zoology. 

MISS JULIA COLPITTS, M. A., 
Instructor in Mathematics. 

MiSS VINA ELETHE CLARK, 
Librarian. 

MISS OLIVE E. STEVENS, B. L., 
Assistant Librarian. 



DIVISION OF AOKICULTUKE. 61 



COURSES OF STUDY IN AGRICULTURE 



The instruction in agriculture is divided into the fol- 
lowing departments: 

I. Department of Practical Agriculture. 
II. Department of Dairying. 

III. Department of Animal Husbandry. 

IV. Department of Horticulture. 

V. Department of Agricultural Chemistry. 

The courses in these several departments unite in 
making a foundation for the student upon which he can 
build a successful career as a farmer, or develop into a 
specialist in the many possible lines that are branches of 
the farming industry. The studies pursued in each depart- 
ment are equally recognized as being necessary to fully 
equip the student for the highest order of work in any 
division of agriculture, and the only difference between the 
shorter and the longer courses is due to the degree to 
which the student wishes to specialize and develop himself 
for a single line of work. The farm as it is commonly con- 
ducted is a union of many divisions of industry and the 
shorter course confines itself to laying a foundation that 
will secure success in all of these, while the longer course 
seeks to direct the student into that line which will call 
forth and centralize his special ability and at the same" 
time enable him to meet the variety of conditions that un- 
der all circumstances surround a successful life. 

Past experience with the courses of these departments 
shows that they have met with more than the usual success 
in attaining their objects; as the shorter course has been 
productive of many successful farmers, and the longer 
course has been unusually successful in developing better 
farmers and more capable men in practical life, and also 






62 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

in securing for our graduates prominent positions in the 
agricultural faculties of other colleges. 

DEPARTMENT OF PRACTICAL AGRICULTURE. 

CHARLES F. CUBTISS, PROFESSOR. 
AND JOSEPH J. EDGERTON, ASSISTANTS. 



In practical agriculture, a field unsurpassed by any oth- 
er college in the United States is open to the students. 
The national government gives to the College about thirty- 
five thousand dollars annually for original experimentation 
and instruction in agriculture and the sciences related to 
the industries. This enables the college authorities to 
make the fields and the barns veritable laboratories of ex- 
tensive and most practical investigation and observation. 
The range is from the soil that produces, through all of 
its natural characteristics, to whatever is grown in agri- 
culture from germ to finish. A live stock room is set apart 
in Agricultural Hall in connection with one of the best reci- 
tation rooms, into which live animals are brought in the 
presence of the teacher and the class for careful study and 
intimate knowledge, and a commodious, well-lighted stock 
judging pavilion has been constructed especially for this 
work. An experimental barn with the recent and most ap- 
proved methods of stalls, feeding and ventilation, is de- 
wier] exclusively to the original work of animal husbandry. 
This work ranges over all the questions of breeding and 
maturing domestic animals. 

The agricultural school is designed to teach the 
sciences that underlie practical agriculture, and sufficient 
English literature, mathematics, history, and other supple- 
mentary studies to sustain both scientific and practical 
agriculture and to develop the agricultural students to the 
Intellectural level of ll <> educated in any profession. 
Special attention is given to the Improved methods in all of 
iiif various operations <>r farming, farm building, using 
Hid machinery, and managemenl of all kinds of stock 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE. 63 

and crops. The instruction of this department embraces 
principles and practice of agriculture. 

The farm consists of 800 acres of rolling prairies, bot- 
tom, and woodland, and is stocked with good representa- 
tives of six breeds of horses, six breeds of cattle, seven 
breeds of sheep, and six breeds of hogs. These animals are 
used in class illustration and for the various experiments 
in breeding and feeding for milk, meat, wool, growth and 
maintenance, conducted by the Experiment Station as a 
department of the College. All the crops of the farm are 
grown for some educational purpose; all the animals are 
fed by rule and system, and the result of their management 
reported upon, and used in class work. Labor is not com- 
pulsory, but students in the agricultural course are given 
work that is educational and parallel with their studies. 
Some students pay for their board by work in the mornings 
and evenings. Under direction of the professor in charge, 
students assist in conducting experiments in lines related 
to their studies. 

Course I. — Principles of Mechanics and Heat and Me- 
teorology, (Physics, V., and Geology, I) in the first term, 
Sophomore Year, is a course of instruction in the scientific 
principles and mathematical formulae governing the sub- 
jects named. Professors Spinney and Beyer. 

Course II. — Agricultural Physics, second term, Sopho- 
more Year. In this subject students are taught to apply 
the principles of Course I to the problems of the farm and 
the operation of farm machinery. Professor Edgerton. 
Hires and laboratory. 

Course III.-- Soil Physics, first term, Junior Year, in- 
cludes a careful study of the physical condition of the soil 
essential to the best utilization of plant food, conserving 
soil moisture, root structure and development and growth 
of farm crops. Professor Edgerton. Lectures and labora- 
tory. 

Course IV.— Farm Drainage, second term, Sophomore 
Year, includes practical effects of drainage, land needing 
drainage, preliminary and topographical survey, involving 



64 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

the different problems of drainage, engineering, map draw- 
ing, calculating depth of drains and capacity of pipes, lay- 
ing the drains and preserving them intact. Professor 
Edgerton. Lectures and field work. 

Course V., First term, and Course VI, second term, 
Field Crops and Farm Management, includes the planting, 
cultivation and management of crops, rotation, mainten- 
ance of soil fertility, plant growth and nutrition, manage- 
ment and application of manures, harvesting, stacking, 
plowing, preserving fodders, and pasture and field observa- 
tions. Professor Curtiss. 

DEPARTMENT OF DAIRYING. 

CHARLES V. CURTISS AND GEO. L. MCKAY, PROFESSORS. 
P. W. BOUSKA AND C. LARSEN, ASSISTANTS. 

The magnitude and rapidly changing conditions of the 
dairy industry render a higher degree of skill and intelli- 
gence in this field imperative. No branch of industrial ed- 
ucation has proven more popular or productive of better re- 
sults than the instruction furnished in the economical pro- 
duction of a superior class of dairy products. From the 
fertile farming lands of the Central West annually come 
one hundred or more young men to be trained in special 
work in our dairy school. That these young men become 
loaders wherever they take up work, is shown by the re- 
sponsible positions they are holding at high salaries in 
dairy communities everywhere, and the many 
prizes won in state and national conventions. Even the 
city milk supply business is calling for scientifically trained 
men who thoroughly understand the essential regulations 
for prosier sanitation and cleanliness, pasteurization and 
Btei iliznl ion. 

In order to meet the demands of such instruction, the i 
Dairy School provides two sixteen weeks' courses; one for 
butter and one for cheese making, beginning with the rog- 
ul.-'i college terms and a one year course beginning with 
thi college fear. AlSO a two weeks' course in starters and 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE. 65 

cream ripening, especially designed for experienced mak- 
ers., commencing January 4, 1903. 

The College Creamery is in operation the year round. 
The work is conducted on a practical and commercial scale 
as well as for scientific investigation and instruction. 
The product made invariably brings the highest quotations, 
and has attained an enviable reputation in the markets of 
the United States and England. 

The facilities for teaching dairying in a thoroughly 
practical and scientific manner are unexcelled. The build- 
ing is exceptionally well equipped for practical work as well 
as scientific instruction and investigation. It is more than 
a "dairy building" as the term is generally understood. It 
is a practical working creamery and cheese factory, in oper- 
ation every week day in the year. During the summer 
season from ten to fifteen thousand pounds of milk are 
taken in daily and manufactured into butter and cheese; 
during the winter somewhat less. The milk is purchased 
from farmers living in the vicinity of the College, and they 
are paid for it according to its merits, based not only on 
butter fat determined by the Babcock test, but upon inspec- 
tion of its cleanliness, freedom from all taints, objectionable 
odors and other general qualities. A bacteriological lab- 
oratory forms facilities for instruction and investigation in 
this important feature of the subject. 

The student becomes familiar with everything connect- 
ed with the management of a commercial creamery, and 
meets every problem that is likely to confront him in his 
after work. Five different kinds of separators are used in 
the dairy building and the most approved machinery is 
used throughout. 

The work done in dairying by the students of the four 
year course in Agriculture is outlined in the course of 
tudy. They not only become familiar with the work in 
:he creamery, the cheese factory and the private dairy, but 
study the underlying principles of the entire subject in the 
jroadest sense. The College dairy herd, consisting of thir- 
:y or forty cows regularly in milk affords opportunity for 



66 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

the study of dairy as well as creamery problems. These 
cows are milked and cared for mainly by student help un- 
der the direction of instructors. 

During the latter part of the senior year those stu- 
dents who have shown themselves capable, are permitted 
to spend a portion of their time in the laboratory in origi- 
nal work, and meritorious work of this kind is reported 
in the bulletins of the Experiment Station. 

The courses in dairying were established for the bene- 
fit of those who are already engaged in the business, either 
on the farm or in the creamery or factory, and for this 
reason a very large portion of the time is devoted to prac- 
tical work in the dairy building. 

Students in these courses are taught everything con- 
nected with practical work, from weighing the milk brought 
in by the different patrons and testing the same to running 
the engine, scrubbing the floors and shipping the butter 
The aim is to teach not only how to do all the work inciden 
to a business of this kind, but also why — the reason— th< 
work should be done in the manner taught. The studie 
other than dairying proper which appear in the course 
outlined are such as are necessary to a correct understand 
ing of the principles involved, and all students enterin 
these courses are required to attend them regularly. 

Students in all of the Dairy and Creamery work ar 
required to provide themselves with white suits, keep ther 
clean and in good order. One half of the expense of lam 
d< ring creamery suits will be refunded at the end of eac 
term to all students who have passed a satisfactory inspe< 
tioE in work and cleanliness during the term. 

ONE YEAR COURSE IN DAIRYING. 

'he one year course In dairying is designed to mei 
the wants Of those who wish to acquire an intimate knov I 
''I"" ol practical dairy methods and the underlying prin<l«:rr 

■■•■> ii as to the sciences related thereto. This courltc 
runa through one college year beginning in January aria 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE. 67 

ending in December. Students completing this course will 
receive certificates, but the right is reserved to withhold 
such certificates until satisfactory evidence is furnished of 
ability to successfully manage commercial creameries or 
other large dairy establishments. No other certificate will 
be given for any course in dairying, except to students en- 
titled to a diploma for the four years' course in Agriculture. 
(See note at bottom of page.) Following is the course of 
study pursued: 

FIRST TERM OF SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

Dairy Practice in butter making, 6 days per week.— ~ 
(Dairy I.) 

Ruttermaking, 16 Lectures. — (Dairy II.) 
Milk Testing, 20 Lectures. — (Dairy III.) 
Dairy Machinery, -10 Lectures. — (Dairy IV.) 
Book-keeping, 16 Lectures. — (Dairy V.) 
Bacteriology of Milk, 20 Lectures. — (Dairy VI.) 
Judging Dairy Stock, 16 Lectures. — (Dairy VII.) 



SECOND TERM OF SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

Dairy Practice, 6 days per week. — (Dairy I.) 
Cheesemaking, 16 Lectures. — (Dairy VIII.) 
Pasteurization, 16 Lectures, and Laboratory Work.— 
)airy IX.) 

Feeding Dairy Stock, 20 Lectures.— (Dairy X.) 
Dairy Chemistry, 16 Lectures.— (Dairy XI.) 

Note.— Students taking the One Year Course in Dairy- 

g must be qualified for work in the collegiate department 

and will be expected to furnish satisfactory evidence of a 

horough knowledge of all branches taught in uie com- 

non school. 

THE SUMMER SCHOOL IN DAIRYING. 

mi 

While we earnestly advise those who expect to work in 

r j D flairy lines, either on the farm or in the creamery or fac- 

ouri 0I T> to take the one jpar course in Dairying as outlined 

anibove we realize that there are many who for various 



b» IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

reasons are unable to do this. Believing that a state in- 
stitution should offer every possible encouragement to 
those who desire to fit themselves to do their chosen work 
in the best manner, a Summer School in Dairying is thrown 
open to students. This school begins in January and con- 
tinues sixteen weeks. The same studies are pursued this 
term as in the One Year Course: 

Dairy Practice, 6 half days per week. — (Dairy I.) 
Milk and its Product, 16 Lectures. — (Dairy II.) 
Milk Testing, 20 Lectures.— (Dairy III.) 
Dairy Machinery, 10 Lectures. — (Dairy IV.) 
Book-keeping, 16 Lectures. — (Dairy V.) 
Bacteriology of Milk, 20 Lectures. — (Dairy VI.) 
Feeding and Judging Dairy Stock, 32 Lectures. — (Dairy 
VII.) 

INSTRUCTION IN THE USE OF BUTTER STARTEE 
AND FLAVORS AND ACID TEST. 

The prominent rank attained by students of the Iowa 
Dairy Scnool in state and national contests has led to a 
demand for special instruction in the use of starters and 
flavors and the use of the acid test in buttermaking. This 
course will begin January 5, 1903, and continue two weeks. 
No ow but experienced buttermakers are advised to take 
this course. The fees for this course will be $15.00. 

The scope of the work given in the Department of 
Dairying is set forth in the following statements: 

CoTiRsr: T. — Dairy Practice. — This includes from five to 
seven hours of practical work in the creamery room during 
the first 1erm of the One Year Course. This includes but- 
tcrmaldng with Mr. Larsen and laboratory work in milk 
testing with Mr. Bouska. In the second term of the Year 
Course it includes cheesemaking with Professor McKay 
and Pasteurization with Mr. Bouska. 

COURSE II. — Milk and //.<? Products. — This includes in- 
struction in the composition of nfolk and dairy products, 
tin theory of centrifugal separation and the construction 









DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE. 69 

of the various kinds of separators. Special attention is 
given to the effect of varying conditions of the milk on sep- 
aration. It includes a consideration of the principles of 
cream ripening, churning, and the preparation of the but- 
ter for market. Mr. Larsen. 

Course III. — Milk Testing. — This includes a thorough 
study of the Babcock Test for dairy products with special 
instructions for overcoming the difficulties from varying 
conditions. The tests for determining acidity of cream and 
milk and the use of the lactometer for detecting adultera- 
tions are included, also composite sampling and testing of 
individual cows. Mr. Bouska. 

Course IV. — Dairy Machinery. — (Mechanical Engineer- 
ing XL) — This embraces instruction for firing boilers by 
the most economical methods, the construction and opera- 
tion of engines and pumps, and the placing of machinery 
and shafting. Mr. Lennox. 

Course V. — Bookkeeping. — This course is designed to 
inform the student as to tue best system of bookkeeping 
for the business of the factory. 



Course VI. — Bacteriology of Milk. — This course consists 
I of lectures on the nature of bacteria, distribution and the 
conditions necessary for their growth. The effects pro- 
duced by various bacteria commonly found in milk are 
shown by lectures and demonstrations. The methods of 
handling which cause contamination of milk are considered 
in detail. That the quality of dairy products depends most- 
ly upon the fermentations which have taken place in these 
preparations is shown with detailed attention to the use 
and value of starters in butter and cheesemaking. The 
principles of cream ripening and pasteurization are also in- 
cluded. Mr. Bouska. 



3 tC 

rin 
bu 
mil 
yea 

>& 

gitt- 

ucts 




Course VII.— Judging Dairy Stock.— In this course the 
judging of dairy stock with the score card and by compari- 
son is made a leading feature, while the lectures relate 
mostly to the principles, methods and practice of breeding 



70 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



dairy stock and their management. Professor W. J. Ken- 
nedy and Mr. Marshall. 

Course VIII. — Cheese Making. — In the winter term, this 
consists of ten lectures on Chedder cheese, including a 
study of the kind of cheese demanded by different markets, 
etc. In the second term of the One Year Course, the same 
work is taken up as during the winter term, but with the 
addition of six lectures on fancy brands of cheese, including 
Limburger, Brick, Swiss, Roquefort, Sage, Stilton, Pine, ] 
Apple and Gouda. Professor McKay. 

Course IX. — Pasteurization. — Second Term, One Year 
Course in Dairying. The subjects treated in this course 
are the relation of the milk supply o the public health, fhe 
principles of pasteurization and apparatus adapted for 
various purposes, with the practical operation of the more 
common machines. The production and the sale of "Sani- 
tary" milk is taken up together with a general considera- 
tion of the market milk business, the use of preservatives 
and allied topics. Mr. Bouska. 

Course X. — Feeding Dairy Stock. — Second Term, One 
Year Course in Dairying. Special attention is given in this 
course to the principles of feeding animals for the most 
economical production, with a study of the composition and 
use of various feeding materials, and the feeding of dairj 
cows, including the influence of various feeding stuffs or 
the quantity, quality and composition of milk, butter anc 
cheese. Mr. Marshall. 

Course XI. — Dairy Chemistry. — (Ag. Chemistry, V or 
VI.) The chemical composition of dairy products is con 
Bldered in a general manner. The alkali test both ii 
theory and practice is given in order that it may b< 
used by >iie student. The adulteration of butter, chees< 
and mill-: as H relates to the dairy industry is also takei 
up in the lectures. As a whole, the work is intended to fiu 
uisb ;i foundation for the student,, which he can use as 
for i hi in'' study. Professor W"oms. 

Coi i- ' xii Scoring Butter and Cheese.— -These lee 
turei are designed to give the student a correct idea of th 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE. 71 

standard market requirements for dairy products. Butter 
and cheese are examined and scored by the students and 
their judgments compared with that of the instructor, 
Professor G. L. McKay. 

Course XIII. — Farm Dairying. — This is a required 
study first term Junior year. Optional study in course for 
women. Two recitations and two laboratories per week. 
The class work takes up composition and secretion of milk, 
separation of cream by gravity and centrifugal separators, 
the Babcock test for fat, ripening cream, churning and 
packing butter. The second half of the term is given to lec- 
tures on the Bacteriology of milk with reference to the gen- 
eral applications of the subject, such as contamination of 
milk, relation of bacterial changes to butter and cheese, 
milk relation of bacterial cnanges to butter and cheese, 
etc. The laboratory work may be done in the creamery 
proper or in the farm dairying room, as desired. In the 
e| latter, the apparatus and work are arranged and the butter 
is made as it is in the best modern private dairies. The stu- 
dent uses the Babcock Test, the lactometer and churns, 
butterworkers and separators of various design. Mr. 
Bouska, Mr. Larsen. 

Course XIV. — Farm Dairying. — Second Term, Junior 

iry Year. Two laboratories and one recitation per week in 

od cheesemaking. For class work see Dairy VIII. Labora- 

m(! tory work in making cheese under conditions of a good 

private dairy. Also practice in making factory cheese if 

desired. Professor McKay. 

CorusE XV. — This course includes one laboratory and 
one lecture per week. The various types of m-ik fermenta- 
tion are taken up and studied in the laboratory. Practical 
experiments are made in regard to the contamination of 
milk and its prevention. The applications of the principles 
of bacteriology to butter and cheese making are studied and 
the use and importance of starters shown by experiment. 
Mr. Bouska. 

Coubse XVI.— This course is arranged by the instruc- 
ts tors to suit the needs of the students. It is mostly labora- 



72 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

tory work with assigned topics in standard dairy books. 
Mr. Bouska. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. 

CHARLES F. CURTISS AND W. J. KENNEDY, PROFESSORS. 
F. R. MARSHALL, ASSISTANT. 

As the importance of the live stoc : Industry to the 
welfare of the state has long been recognized, the equip- 
ment for instruction work has now become very complete. 
The herds and flocks were established at an early day on a 
good foundation and having been maintained in conform- 
ance with modern ideas, the number and quality of the 
stock offer the students unusual facilities for becoming in- 
formed along these lines. 

The horse department includes representatives of the 
leading draft and light horses. Among these are Shires, 
Clydesdales, and Percherons, some of them directly import- 
ed by the College, and others obtained from the leading 
studs of our country. The breeds of light horses include 
the French coach, trotted and gaited saddle bred repre- 
sentatives. These are always available for the study of 
the students, either in the class room or when actively en- 
gaged in the ordinary work of the farm. 

The cattle department numbers over a hundred head, 
representing the leading beef and dairy breeds. Complete 
herds of Short Horns, Aberdeen Angus, Red Polled, Jersey 
and Holstein cattle are maintained. Most of these herds 
have been in course of formation for a great many years so 
that it is possible for the students to study not only the 
types of the different breeds, but they are also able to form 
conclusions as to the results that may be obtained from 
them under the farm conditions of Iowa. 

The equipment of the sheep department is equally 
Strong, as there are six breeds fittingly represented includ- 
ing CotSWOldB, Shropshires, Oxfords, Southdowns, Dorsets 
and Merinos. These have been carefully chosen to repre- I 



DIVISION OF AGKICULTUKE. 73 

sent the type and characteristics of each breed, both in re- 
gard to their mutton and wool bearing qualities. 

In the swine department representatives of six breeds 
are maintained, including the best American as well as 
the leading British varieties. As in tne other departments, 
the aim in this has been to keep in touch with the modern 
ideas of the leading breeders, both in regard to breeding 
and type of the animals in these breeds. At all seasons 
of the year there is more or less feeding of market stock 
being done on the farm and in connection with the Experi- 
ment Station, so that excellent material is always available 
for instruction purposes regarding the qualities that add 
to the value of stock for the ordinary market. Having 
pure bred representatives in addition, it is easy to inform 
the student in a practical way on the finer points of color, 
type and other characteristics that relate to the pure bred 
classes of stock. 

To further assist in this work, the herd books of the 
different American and foreign registry associations are be- 
ing constantly added to the library. Through these the 
student is not only enabled to inform himself in regard to 
pedigrees, but he is also enabled through them to study 
the different scales of points which the breeders have 
adopted as representing the highest type of the breeds. 
Other features of the equipment include paragraphs and 
charts utilized in the lecture room where it is not possible 
to make suitable representation with the living animals. It 
is the aim of the department to illustrate all lines of instruc- 
tion with living representatives, and for that purpose a live 
stock room has been specially fitted. In addition a large 
pavilion has been constructed specially designed for the 
uses of the classes in live stock judging. The abundant 
material available from the herds and flocks is freely drawn 
upon and used extensively in an lectures and score card prac- 
tice. By means of score cards prepared by the department, 
erf the students are brought in close contact with the animals 
and through them are informed on the points of market 
merit desirable in ordinary stock; while later the use of the 



74 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

official scale of points for the different breeds in a similar 
way, makes them skillful in judging representatives of the 
different breeds. 

As soon as the student shows that he possesses the 
qualifications needed to successfully judge stock in the 
show ring, he is sent out in answer to the many requests 
from the secretaries to judge various classes of stock at 
county fairs. This in connection with his college work re- 
sults in crystalizing the lessons learned in the class room.; 

WINTER COURSE IN STOCK AND GRAIN JUDGING. 

In response to a widespread demand for special short 
course instruction in judging stock and grain, a two weeks' 
course has been established during the winter vacation. 
This course will begin January 5, 1903 and continue twcj 
weeks and will be devoted exclusively to instruction in 
judging and score card practice with horses, cattle, sheep 
and hogs, and in addition, the study of grains will be taken 
up during the evening. This work will be principally with 
corn and will consist in lectures and instruction with the 
score card. Some time will also be given to the study of 
wheat, oats and barley. The regular instructors of the 
College will be assisted in this work by some of the best 
known expert stock and grain judges of America. To par- 
tially cover the expense of securing additional help and 
stock for demonstration a tuition fee of $2.00 will be charged 
for admission to this course. 

The following courses of study are given in Animal 
Husbandry: 

Course IA. — Market Types — Cattle and Sheep — First 
Term. Freshman Year. This course covers the judging of i 
the different market classes of cattle, (beef and dairy) and 
: Im < p (mutton and wool.) Judging two 2 hour periods perj 
week. Mr. Marshall. 

COUBS] II A.- Market Types — Horses and Swine. — Sec- 
ond Term. Freshman fear. This course covers the judging of J 
the different market classes of horses (light and heavy). 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE. 75 

and swine (bacon and fat.) Judging two 2 hour periods per 
week. Mr. Marshall. 

Course IIIA.— Breed Types— Cattle and Sheep.— First 
Term. Sophomore Year. This course covers the judging 
of representatives of the different breeds according to their 
official standards; also a study of their origin, history, 
characteristics and adaptability to different conditions oi 
climate and soil. Lectures two 1 hour periods per week. 
Judging two 2 hour periods per week. Professor Kennedy 
and Mr. Marshall. 

Course IVA. — Breed Types — Horses and Swine. — Second 
Term. Sophomore Year. This course covers the judging 
1 1 of representatives of the different breeds according to their 
5 jl official standards; also a study of their origin, history and 
j characteristics, and adaptability to different conditions of 
climate and soil. Lectures two 1 hour periods per week. 
Judging two 2 hour periods per week. Professor Kennedy 
and Mr. Marshall. 

Course VA. — Live Stock Management. — The housing, 
feeding, care and management of the various classes of live 
stock. Lectures two 1 hour periods per week. Mr. Mar- 
shall. 

Course VIA. — Advanced Stock Judging. — First Tterm. 
Senior Year. This course covers horses, cattle, sheep and 
r swine, especial attention being paid to the judging of 
E( l| groups of animals similar to county and state fair work. 
Judging two 2 hour periods per week. This course is in- 
tended for students specializing in Animal Husbandry. 
Prefessor Kennedy. 

Course VI I A. — Animal By-Products and Herd Book 
Study. — Second Term. Senior Year. This course covers a 
critical study of animal by-products, as designated by the 
leading packing establishments, first half of term. Second 
half of term will be devoted to the careful study of pedi- 
grees of the leading families of the various breeds of live 
stock. Two 1 hour periods per week. Professor Ken- 
nedy. 

Course VIII. — Principles of Breeding. — First Term. 



76 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Junior Year. This course embraces a study of the princi- 
ples of breeding, including selection, heredity, atavism, 
variation, fecundity, with the presentation of the methods 
of breeding, in-and-in breeding, cross breeding, etc., and a 
historical study of their results. In addition, the several 
features relating to the higher breeding of pure bred stock 
are made the subject of study and investigation. Professor 
Curtiss. 

Course IX. — Animal Nutrition. — Second Term. Senior 
Year. This course includes anatomy and physiology of the 
digestive system, the purposes of nutrition, theory and prac- 
tical economy of rations for growth, fattening, milk or 
maintenance; sanitation of feeds and hygiene of the farm. 
Prefessor Kennedy. 

DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE AND FORESTRY. 

HOMER C. PRICE, PROFESSOR. 
ARTHUR T. ERWIN AND EDWIN E. LITTLE, ASSISTANTS. 

The studies in Horticulture and Forestry, are designed 
to round up and fill out the Course in Agriculture. A grad- 
uate in Agriculture is expected to have such knowledge of 
the principles of horticulture as will assist him either in 
beautifying and adding to the luxuries of his home on the 
one hand, or on the other, such as will guide him rightly 
should he engage in commercial fruit growing. 

Fruit growing is rapidly becoming a specialized indus- 
try and success rewards the laborer in proportion as intel- 
ligent skill and perseverance are applied to the work with 
a thorough understanding of the principles. 

FACILITIES FOR STUDY, AND DEPARTMENTAL 
EQUIPMENT. 

The Department of Horticulture has offices, classroom 
and library on the second floor of Agricultural Hall, a lab- 
oratory building 35x^0 feet, two stories high with a nine 
foot basement, greenhouses, consisting of a curvilinear 
palm house 24x33 feet, an even span rose house 19x33 feet, 



DIVISION OF AGKICULTUEE. 77 

and three propagating houses 10x33 feet. The laboratory 
building is connected with the green houses by a glass pas- 
sageway which opens into the main laboratory room. 
The main floor of the building also contains the po- 
mology room, provided with bench room for twenty-five stu- 
dents to work in the study of fruits. Opening off the pomo- 
logy room are two refrigerators, one for experimental work 
in cold storage ana the other for storing such fruits as are 
needed for instructional purposes. The greenhouses give 
every opportunity for the student to become familiar with 
the management of plants under glass, and the collection of 
plants has been made with the view of having them of 
educational value. 

The department has a large library which is kept in the 
offices in Agricultural Hall and in addition to the complete 
files of horticultural publications of the country, possesses 
the private library of Charles Downing, the author of 
"Fruits and Fruit Trees of America," which contains many 
rare horticultural works as well as his original notes and 
manuscript. 

The land devoted to Horticultural purposes comprises 
about forty acres. In this area are orchards of varying 
ages from twenty-five years down to those set within the 
last two years. The varieties of fruits on trial number 
more than one thousand and include the hardiest types of 
native and foreign kinds. The student is thus afforded un- 
usual facilities for observation and study. Adjacent to the 
orchards and small fruit plantations are the nursery 
grounds where the operations of the nurserymen in the 
various methods of stratification, budding and grafting are 
illustrated in a practical manner. A considerable area is 
devoted each year to the growing of vegetables and variety 
tests of the leading types are made in connection with the 
Experiment Station work, thus affording ample opportunity 
for field study in the methods of culture practiced by the 
amateur and market gardener. 

There is a forest plantation of about ten acres in 
which are growing a large number of the best varieties of 



78 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

deciduous trees for the northwest. A large collection of 
prepared sections of the American woods is used for il- 
lustrating the lectures on forestry. The campus and shel- 
ter belts surrounding the College give ample opportunity 
for a study of the camparative vame of native and foreign 
trees when used for windureaks and landscape enect. 
Horticulture in its d inherent branches is continued from the 
second term freshman year to the close of me senior year. 
Special encouragement is offered to senior students wno 
wish to pursue some line of original investigation. Tne 
graduate who elects the Horticultural Group in his senior 
year will find himself well equipped to pursue post grad- 
uate studies at this or other institutions of like character. 
Text books are used in each course when it. is possible to 
do so advantageously. Lectures are given when it is neces- 
sary to enlarge or supplement the text. The following 
courses of study are offered by this department. 

Course I. — Elementary Horticulture. — This course is a 
study of the underlying principles of plant growth as ef- 
fected by moisture, light, temperature and food supply. 
The student begins with the plant life in the seed and fol- 
lows it through its numerous stages of growth to the ma- 
ture plant. The multiplication of plants by seedage, cut- 
tage, layerage and grafiage are studied in connection with 
the practical laboratory work along these lines. This 
course is a pre-requisite to all other courses in Horticulture 
except course No. XI. Two recitations and one laboratory 
period a week. Spring term, Freshman.. Professor Price 
and Mr. Erwin. 

COUESE II. — Forestry. — This includes a study of fores- 
try influences upon climate, rain-fall and erosion. A study 
is also made of the best varieties of trees for shelter-belts 
and windbreaks in the northwest. Two hours per week. 
Spring term Sophomore. Professor Price. 

Course III. — Greenhouse Management. — This course 
embraces, a historical sketch of the evolution of green 
house structures, and a discussion of the principles of 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE. 79 

forcing flowers and vegetables in the greenhouse and hot- 
bed. One recitation and one laboratory per week. Fall 
term, Senior. Mr. Erwin. 

Course IV. — Pomology. — Under this head the principles 
which underly successful orcharding in the northwest are 
studied; and the history and characteristics of the leading 
varieties of the orchard fruits are studied. Score card 
practice is given in judging apples, plums, pears and grapes. 
Three hours per week. Fall term, Junior. Professor 
Price, and Mr. Little. 

Course V. — Olericulture. — This comprises a study of 
vegetables and small fruits of the garden from the stand- 
point of the amateur and the market gardener. Two hours 
per week. Fall term, Sophomore. Mr. Erwin. 

Couese VI. — Field Work. — This course is designed to 
give the student a personal touch and acquaintance with 
the practical details of orchard management. Pruning, 
spraying and plant breeding are studied theoretically and 
practically. One lecture and a field exercise of two hours 
per week. Spring term, Junior. Mr. Erwin and Mr. Lit- 
tle. 

Coukse VII. — Evolution of Cultivated Plants. — Under 
this head stress is laid upon the improvement and develop- 
ment of our native plants. A study is made of the ameli- 
oration and development of American fruits. One hour, 
Spring term, Senior. Professor Price. 

Course VIII. — Landscape Gardening. — Lectures on 
landscape gardening as an art; artificial and natural 
methods are compared, and the embellishment of home sur- 
roundings; lawn-making and shrubs suitable for the climate 
and soil of Iowa are studied. Two hours. Fall term, Sen- 
ior. Professor Price. 

Course IX. — Literature of Horticulture. — A study of 
European ^ and American Horticultural Literature. A his- 
torical study is made of the lives, works and writings of 
the pioneers in the various branches of Horticulture. One 
hour. Spring term, Senior. Professor Price. 

Couese X.— Research.— Offered to students who have 



80 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

elected work in Group D. A special line of investigation 
will be mapped out, which the student is expected to pur- 
sue independently. Two hours. Spring term, Senior, Pro- 
fessor Price. 

Course XI. — Amateur Floriculture. — The study of win- 
dow gardening, seed sowing, propagation and general man- 
agement of house plants; the out door flower garden and 
treatment of flower beds and borders. Lectures and reci- 
tations two hours per week. This is an elective in women's 
course only. Fall term, Junior. Mr. Erwin. 

Students electing course X are allowed to use it as a 
basis of preliminary work in the preparation of theses. 

Post-Graduate work is offered in the leading advanced 
courses outlined above. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY. 

JULIUS BUEL WEEMS, PROFESSOR. 

C. E. GRAY, ASSISTANT. 

i 

The Department of Agricultural Chemistry is con- 
nected with the chemical section of the Experiment 
Station, both occupying a large part of the first floor of 
Agricultural Hall. The department and the section have 
separate laboratories, each equipped for its special work, 
the first for student work and the second for research and 
general analytical chemistry. 

The advantages of this combination can be readily 
seen, as it affords the student many opportunities to be- 
come familiar with the practical side of Agricultural 
Chemistry, and at the same time illustrating to him the 
value of the laboratory processes which he carries through 
as part of his course of study when applied to the study 
of the problems of modern agriculture. 

The student on commencing the course of study is 
provided with a separate desk in the laboratory, and is 
furnished with a supply of chemical apparatus and chemi- 
cals for his individual use. The desk is supplied with 
water and gas, and cupboards and drawers are provided 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE. 81 

with locks enabling the student to have full control over 
the chemical apparatus in his possession. 

The laboratory is well supplied with hoods and the 
balance room contains six Sartoris balances. Each student 
is assigned to a balance and is expected to use the balance 
only in his work. 

Throughout the entire course of Agricultural Chemis- 
try special stress is laid upon the study of the elements 
and compounds which are valuable to the agriculturalist, 
and very little attention is given to the study of the rare 
or uncommon elements. The student records the observa- 
tions made in the laboratory in a notebook kept for this 
purpose, and at the close of each term the instructor marks 
it as part of the student's work; considering the care with 
which the results of the laboratory experiments are re- 
corded, the penmanship and the English used in describing 
the experiments made by the student. The mark given on 
the condition of the notebook is considered in the final mark 
that determines the student's standing in the study for the 
term. 

The following courses of study are offered by the de- 
partment: 

Course I. — Elementary Agricultural Chemistry. — This 
course of study requires three recitations and two after- 
noons of laboratory practice each week for one term. The 
course is arranged for those commencing the study of 
Agricultural Chemistry and is therefore of an elementary 
character. The student begins the study by making obser- 
vations on a few substances and becoming familiar with 
the processes connected with the science. As the student 
progresses in his work the study becomes more and more 
complex, until he reaches qualitative analysis, in which, 
after a general introductiton to the reactions of a number 
of elements, he tests a series of unknown solutions in order 
that he may obtain as much practice as possible in this part 
of the study. 



82 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

The laboratory work is supplemented by oral examina- 
tions in the class room. The above course of study is 
given in the second term. 

The text book used is Remsen's Inorganic Chemistry, 
Briefer Course. 

Course II. — General Chemistry in Its Relations to Agri- 
cuture. — This course of study is practically a selection of 
laboratory exercises which are of value to the student in 
agriculture. It is given during the second term and re- 
puires two recitations with two afternoons of three hours 
each for laboratory practice every week during the term. 

The recitations are upon organic chemistry, and the 
laboratory practice consists in estimating the amount of 
various elements present in substances which are import- 
ant to agriculture. The substances first submitted to the 
student for examination are pure salts and are soon fol- 
lowed by complex mixtures similar to those met with in 
practical work. The entire series of determinations made 
by the student are upon substances, the knowledge of which 
will be of value to him in the practical field of agriculture. 
The laboratory practice is supplemented by lectures and 
oral examinations as often as thought necessary by the 
instructor. 

The text book used is Remsen's Organic Chemistry, 
which is supplemented by lectures and notes for the labora- 
tory practice. 

Course III. — Advanced Chemistry as Related to Agri- 
culture. — This course of study is given during the first term 
and requires two recitations or lectures and two afternoons 
of three hours each of laboratory practice each week for 
one term. The class work consists of a study of soils and 
their relation to plant growth, the ash of the plant and the 
influence of fertilizers in plant growth, etc. The student 
undertakes in tbe laboratory preparations of a number of 
Btandard solutions in volumetric analysis and special atten- 
tion is placed on the preparation of the solutions required 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTUEE. 83 

for use of the "Mann's" or "Alkali" test in the determina- 
tion of the acidity of milk and cream. 

The student also becomes familiar with the polariscope 
and its uses. In connection with this part of his course he 
makes complete analyses of sugar beets, samples of which 
are submitted to him for this purpose. 

If time perimts the examination of water for sanitary 
purposes is undertaken, and which may be extended to 
the examination of the mineral constituents of water should 
the student desire to do so. 

Course IV. — Special Organic Chemistry Related to Agri- 
culture. — This course is given in the first term, requiring 
two recitations or lectures and two afternoons of three 
hours in laboratory pratice each week during the term. 
The laboratory practice consists of chemical examinations 
of milk, butter, cheese and other agricultural products. In 
the course of lectures the following among other subjects, 
are considered: The chemistry of digestion; food and 
its adulteration; ptomaines, their formation and action on 
the animal body, and advanced chemistry of the plant. . 

Special notes are used for the laboratory practice. 

Course V. — Elementary Dairy Chemistry. — This course 
is a short course of lectures offered to the students in the 
winter dairy school, and is limited to the consideration of 
a few subjects of a practical nature. 

Course VI. — Dairy Chemistry. — This is a course of lec- 
tures offered to the one-year dairy students and the subject 
is considered to a greater extent in this course than in the 
elementary course. 

Course VII. — Additional Agricultural Chemistry. — This 
course of study is offered to students who may desire to 
take additional work in Agricultural Chemistry in the 
Senior year, and it consists in a special course in laboratory 
practice and a selected course in reading, which is related 
to the laboratory work. The entire course is made to 
meet the desire of the student in any special line of work. 

Course VIII. — Thesis. — Those who may desire to spec- 
ialize in Agricultural Chemistry during the undergraduate 



84 IOWA STATE COLLEGE'. 

course can select a thesis on some chemical subject. The 
scope of the work will be as far as possible of the nature 
of an investigation on some topic which is of interest to 
the student. 

Courses I, II, III and IV are required of all students 
in Agriculture. Course I is taken in the Sophomore Year. 
Courses II and III are taken in the Junior Year, and course 
IV in the Senior Year. 

The material required in the laboratory courses is 
furnished by the department at cost. To cover the cost 
of material and breakage, a deposit of $5.00 is required for 
each of the courses, I, II, III, IV, VII and VIII. The deposit 
must be made before the student begins work in the labor- 
atory, and balances from these deposits are returned at the 
end of each term. 

In addition to the above courses of study offered by 
the department, graduate students are offered courses in 
Agricultural Chemistry which may be taken as a minor or 
major study in their grauuate course. These courses are ar- 
ranged to meet, as far as possible, the individual interests 
of the students. 

The courses offered by the Department for Graduate 
students are as follows: 

Couese IX. — Minor in Inorganic Agricultural Chemis- 
try. 

Couese X. — Minor in Organic Agricultural Chemistry. 

Couese XI. — Major in Inorganic Agricultural Chemis- 
try. 

Couese XII. — Major in Organic Agricultural Chemistry. 

The nature of the work for both minor and major 
studies will be that of an investigation in some subject 
to be selected by the student and the head of the depart- 
ment. 

Couesk XIII. — Elementary Mineral Chemistry. — This 
course is intended for those interested in the study of Chem- 
istry in its relation to Ceramics. It is restricted to the 
elementary study of those elements and compounds which 
are found valuablle in the study of Geology. The course 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTUKE. 85 

requires two recitations and three laboratories each week 
of the term. 

Special notes will be used for recitations and labora- 
tory practice. 

Course XIV. — Mineral and Geological Chemistry. — The 
course of study is given during the second term and re- 
quires two recitations and three afternoons of laboratory 
practice. The laboratory practice will consist of the esti- 
mation of various substances found in the material of value 
to the clay industries. The recitations in the class-room 
will be closely connected with the laboratory work and 
related subjects. 

Special notes will be used for the class-room and the 
laboratory. 

Course XV. — Chemistry of Clays. — This course of study 
is given during the first term and requires two recitations 
and three afternoons of laboratory practice each week. 
The work of this term is intended to offer the student 
every opportunity to apply in practical laboratory work to 
the results of study in courses ^vIII and XIV. The laboratory 
practice will be practical work upon clays. Both rational 
and complete chemical analysis of clays will be made by the 
student. Analysis of samples of lime stone and other pro- 
ducts will supplement the work on clays. The recitations 
will be closely related to the laboratory work. 

Special notes will be used for the course. 

Course XVI. — Chemistry of Clays and Glazes. — This 
course of study will be given in the second term and will 
require two recitations and three afternoons of laboratory 
practice. 

The laboratory practice will consist of practical work 
on products connected with clay industries, analysis of 
water for boiler and other purposes, and analysis of paints, 
coal and similar products. 

The recitations will supplement the laboratory work 
and will also consider chemistry in its relation to the cer- 
amic industry. 



86 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Special notes will be used for recitation and laboratory 
practice. 

Coukse XVII. — General Technical Chemistry. — This 
course is designed for those who have had a training in 
elementary chemistry and desire to specialize in technical 
chemistry. The course of study will consist of three lec- 
tures or recitations per week and two afternoons of labor- 
atory practice. The lectures and class-room recitations 
will be largely on advanced inorganic chemistry in its re- 
lation to the technical industries. The laboratory practice 
will consist in the quantitative analysis of those substances 
of value to the industrial processes connected with manu- 
facturing. 

This course of study is offered in the first term. 

Couese XVIII. — Advanced Technical Chemistry. — This 
course of study is a continuation of the course in General 
Technical Chemistry and will consist in the analysis of 
clays, glazes, fertilizers, pigments, water for boiler purposes, 
etc. 

Three recitations or lectures and two afternoons of 
laboratory practice each week will be required for this 
course of study. 

The recitations and lectures will supplement the lab- 
oratory practice. 

Special notes will be used in the course. 

Coubse XIX. — General Organic Chemistry in Its Rela- 
tion to Engineering. — It is the purpose of this course of 
study to offer the student studies in the Sanitary Analysis 
of Water, Analysis of Sewarge, Foods, their composition and 
analysis. The manufacture of food products and their 
analysis, such as cereal products, sugar, starch, etc. The 
lectures and recitations after an introductory course in 
organic chemistry will be largely upon the chemistry of 
water, its analysis, its filtration, and purification for city 
supplies, the value of foods and methods of detection of 
adulteration and the methods of preservation, the manu- 
facture and composition of explosives, paper, and fibers in 
their application to the Industries. The study of substances 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE. 87 

used for disinfectants will also be considered in the course 
of lectures. 

Special notes will be used for recitation and laboratory- 
practice. This course of study requires four recitations 
and three afternoons of laboratory practice. Remsen's 
Organic Chemistry will be used with special notes for 
recitation and laboratory practice. 

Course XX. — Industrial Organic Chemistry in Its Rela- 
tion to Engineering. — This course of study will consist in 
lectures, recitations and laboratory practice on oils, their 
composition and detection of adulteratjons, considering 
both lubricating and drying oils for planting purposes, 
fuels, their composition and heating values; fats, their 
composition and applications, etc. 

In the class room the manufacturing processes used 
in connection with the products studied in the laboratory 
will be considered. Attention will also be given to -the 
relation between the study of chemistry and its application 
to industrial purposes in general. 

Students taking course IX to XX make a deposit of 
$8.00 to cover cost of breakage, chemicals and gas used 
in their laboratory work. 

Course XXI. — This course of study is intended for 
graduate and senior students in advanced organic and inor- 
ganic chemistry in its application to agricultural chemistry. 
The course is intended to supplement the advanced work in 
the laboratory. The text book used is Remsen's Theoretical 
Chemistry. This course requires two hours per week in the 
second term. 

Course XXII. — This course is restricted to graduate 
and senior students. The object of the study is the pre- 
sentation of subjects connected with the teaching of Agri- 
cultural Chemistry and School Hygiene. The course is 
given in the first term and requires two hours per week. 



88 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Course XXIII. — Inorganic Agricultural Chemistry as 
Related to Domestic Science. — This course of study is in- 
tended for students in Domestic Science. Attention is 
given to those elements which are of value in Agriculture 
and at the same time which may he of value to the science 
of the household. Two recitations and two periods of 
laboratory practice each week are required for one term. 
Special notes are used in the laboratory work. The course 
is given during the first term. 

Course XXIV. — Inorganic Agricultural Chemistry as 
Related to Domestic Science. — This course of study is in- 
tended for those who have taken Course XXIII. The study 
of inorganic chemistry is continued and special attention 
given to the relations to the substances of value in Domes- 
tic Science. In the laboratory Quantitative Analysis is com- 
menced and attention is given to the methods of analysis 
of simple substances. Later in the term Organic Chemis- 
try is studied and in the "Laboratory baking powders, cream 
of tartar, vinegars and similar products are analyzed. Two 
recitations and two periods of laboratory practice each 
week are required. The course of study is given during 
the second term. Remsen's Inorganic and Organic Chemis- 
tries are used as text-books. 

Cotttipk XXV. — Advanced Agricultural Chemistry as Re- 
lated to Domestic Science. — This course of study is intended 
for those who have taken Course XXIV. Consideration is 
given to the study of water and sewage, soaps and washing 
powders, foods and food adulterations, etc. The laboratory 
practice supplements the class room study. Two recita- 
tions and one period of laboratory practice each week for 
one term is required for the course. Special notes are used 
for this study. Tbe course is offered during the first term. 

Course XXVI. — Advanced Organic Chemistry as Re- 
laird to Domestic Science.— This course of study is a con- 
tinuation of Course XXV. Consideration is given to the 
Chemistry of milk, butter, cheese, foods and the chemistry 
of digestion, ptomaines, Oils and fats, their composition and 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE. 89 

analysis, chemistry as related to hygiene, etc. The labora- 
tory practice supplements the work of the class room. Spec- 
ial notes are used for this course. Three recitations and two 
periods of laboratory practice each week are required for 
this course 01 study. The course is given during the second 
term. 

EXAMINATION FOR SOUNDNESS. 

Course LX. — Veterinary Science. — In this course, which 
is given in the first term of the Senior year, the student 
is taught how to make a systematic search for disease or 
pathological conditions, the various conditions likely to be 
found in each part and the effect they may have on the 
use of the animal. Two lectures are given each week, 
supplemented by demonstrations on the living animal. 

SANITARY SCIENCE. 

i 

Course LIX. — Veterinary Science. — Two lectures are 
given each week in the first term of the Senior year. The 
following topics are discussed: The great plagues of his- 
tory and their sanitary lessons; the various causes of 
disease; the manner in which disease is propagated and 
spread, including the part played by meat and milk; the 
influence of soil, configuration and climatic conditions, the 
effect of environment, including the ventilation, lighting 
and drainage of stables; preventative measures, including 
disinfection, vaccination and quarantine. 

Course LXXI. — In the second term of the Senior year 
the various infectious, contagious and parasitic diseases are 
separately considered and the methods of preventing their 
introduction and suppressing outbreaks are discussed, two 
lectures being given each week. Dr. Gay. 

PRINCIPLES OP HORSE-SHOEING. 

Course XLI. — Veterinary Science. — In the first term of 
the Junior year one hour each week is devoted to the study 
of the anatomy and physiology of the hoof, the relation 



90 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

between the form of the hoof and the direction of the limb, 
the variations in the flight of the hoof, and shoeing of 
normal and irregular hoofs, winter shoeing and hoof 
culture. 

Couese LI. — Veterinary Science. — In the second term of 
the Junior year the correction of defects in gait and the 
methods of shoeing hoofs defective in form or diseased are 
taken up, one hour each week being devoted to the subject. 

"A Text Book on Horse-Shoeing," by Lungwitz, trans- 
lated by Adams, is used in these courses. Dr. Gay. 

COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY. 

Course XVII. — Veterinary Science. — The physical and 
chemical laws, as they are related to physiology, and the 
general properties of animal cells, their origin, develop- 
ment and growth are studied in the first 1 term of the Fresh- 
man year, one hour each week. 

Course XXXII. — Veterinary Science. — This course ia 
given in the second term of the Freshman year, one hour 
each week and is a continuation of Course XVII. Both 
of these courses are introductory to Courses XXXVIII and 
Course XLVIII. 

"A Manual of Veterinary Physiology," by F. Smith, is 
used in these courses. 

OBSTETRICS. 

Course LXX. — Veterinary Science. — This course in- 
cludes a review of obstetrical anatomy, reproduction, hy- 
giene of pregnant animals, pathology of gestation, normal 
parturition, dystokia, obstetric operations, accidents of par- 
turition, pathology of parturition, diseases of the young 
animal. The students are instructed in the use of the 
various instruments and appliances used in obstetrical prac- 
tice. Dr. Gay. 

MATERIA MEDICA. 
Course XXIX. — Veterinary Science. — This course in 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE. 91 

Materia Medica includes a discussion of all the prepara- 
tions used in veterinary therapeutics. The drugs and prep- 
arations discussed in the lectures are exhibited to the stu- 
dents who are required to become intimately acquainted 
with their leading properties. In case of each drug atten- 
tion is called to the following features or such part of them 
as the character of the drug demands: Botanical name, 
natural order, habitat, description of properties, method of 
preparation, adulterations, names of therapeutic actions, 
preparations official in the United States Pharmacopoeia. 
Course XXXIII. — Veterinary Science. — This is a con- 
tinuation of the work described in Course XXIX. 

COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OP DOMESTIC ANIMALS. 

Course XXXI. — Veterinary Science. — This course con- 
sists in a study of the bones, articulations, muscles, circu- 
latory apparatus, the nervous system, the respiratory sys- 
tem, the organs of digestion, the urino-genital apapratus 
and the organs of special sense, supplemented by demon- 
strations from mounted skeletons, prepared specimens, 
charts and an Auzoux clastic model. 

Course XXXV. — Veterinary Science. — This is a contin- 
uation of the work described in Course XXXI. Dr. McNeall. 

THE AGRICULTURAL CLUB. 

A Students' Agricultural Club holds weekly meetings 
in Agricultural Hall for the consideration of current topics 
in agriculture. A students' reading room is also main- 
tained there, and all the leading agricultural journals are 
kept on file for the use of agricultural students. The 
College Library contains an extensive list of agricultural 
and scientific publications to which students are referred 
for original research and study. 

There are seven literary societies that hold their weekly 
meetings on Saturday evenings and serve to supplement 
the literary work of the college. All students are urged to 
join in the work of the Agricultural Club and advised to 
join one of the literary societies and to avail themselves of 



92 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

these other adjunct means of instruction. The faculty of 
clear and concise thinking and speaking is of incalculaole 
value to the agricultural student. 

REMUNERATIVE AND INSTRUCTIVE LABOR. 

The Agricultural courses afford opportunity to do con- 
siderable work in the fields and about the barns and 
grounds, much of which is instructive and of practical edu- 
cational value. The compensation for services of this 
kind ranges from 8 to 15 cents per hour, according to the 
merit of the work. Students are thus able to earn from 
one-fourth to one-half their expenses and at the same time 
materially strengthen the practical side of their education. 
A number of the strongest and most capable students have 
been aided in finding employment during vacations with 
successful stockmen on good farms. Some young men have 
preferred to take a year of practical work in this way 
during their course, and it has invariably proved of marked 
benefit and enabled them to command more desirable and 
remunerative positions at the completion of their college 
work. Too much emphasis cannot be placed on a thorough 
understanding of the practical application of correct prin- 
ciples in agriculture. 



SPECIAL COURSES. 

Students desiring shorter courses of study will be per- 
mitted to take up special courses in Stock Judging, Feeding 
and Breeding, Practical Agriculture, Dairying, Horticul- 
ture or Agricultural Chemistry, subject to the approval of 
the head of the division and those in immediate charge 
of the work. 

Feeds and Feeding and Farm Crops and Field Manage- 
ment cannot be taken without standings in Chemistry and 
Botany as a pre-requisite. 

Such courses may cover a period of one term, one year 
or two years, hut special students are advised to take not 



J ) l V ESION OF AGRICULTURE. 93 

less than one year's work in any chosen branch and in all 
cases where practicable or possible to do so, students are 
urged to complete the four years' course. The results will 
fully justify the time and expense required and modern 
agriculture demands thorough training, special fitness, and 
a high order of ability. No degrees are granted for less 
than four years' work. 

POST GRADUATE COURSES. 

Post Graduate courses are offered in the following 
lines: 

1. Practical Agriculture, major or minor in 

(a) Field Crops. 

(b) Farm Management. 

(c) Drainage. 

2. Dairying. 

(a) Butter Making. 

(b) Cheese Making. 

(c) Farm Dairying. 

(d) Dairy Bacteriology. 

3. Animal Husbandry. 

(a) Study of Breeds. 

(b) Stock Judging. 

(c) Practical Management of Stock. 

(d) Feeds and Feeding. 

(e) Heredity. 

4. Horticulture, major or minor in 

(a) Pomology. 

(b) Olericulture. 

(c) Forestry. 

5. Agricultural Chemistry, major or minor in 

(a) Organic Agricultural Chemistry. 

(b) Inorganic Agricultural Chemistry. 

The four years courses lead to the degrees of B. S. A., 
Bachelor of Scientific Agriculture. Graduate Students are 
eligible for the degree of M. S. A., Master of Scientific 
Agriculture. This degree is granted only to students who 
have completed a four year course in this or some similar 



94 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

college and completed a two year post graduate course in 
scientific and practical agriculture, one year of which must 
be resident work at this college. The work required for a 
post graduate degree is largely in the nature of personal 
research and investigation under the direction of the pro- 
fessors in charge of the studies chosen. The work selected 
must embrace a major and a minor subject in different 
departments. 

CREDITS FOR PRACTICAL WORK. 

Agricultural students who by previous agreement with 
the head of the department, do practical work on farms, 
horticultural or feeding or breeding establishments, beet 
sugar factories or forestry reservations, of recognized stand- 
ing, during their course of study will be allowed credits 
on the following basis: Students who take practical work 
of the kind described under the direction of the proprietor 
and render competent and faithful service, will, on their 
return to the College and the presentation of a concise writ- 
ten report or resume of their observations and experience, 
be entitled to the following credits in the four year course 
in Agriculture: 

For three months, five hours of elective work in the 
Junior or Senior year; for six months, eight hours; and 
for one year, ten hours; not more than five hours of which 
shall be credited in any one term of the college course. 

CLAY, ROBINSON & CO. FELLOWSHIP. 

At the International Live Stock Exposition held at 
Chicago in December, 1901, the College won $530 of the 
Bpecial prizes offered by Clay, Robinson & Co. This has 
been used to establish fellowships in Animal Husbandry 
which will be awarded to deserving graduate students, in 
that department. This fellowship will probably be made 
pennant at. 

POSITIONS 

''li r ' demand Tor competent young men thoroughly 
trained in practical and scientific agriculture and dairying 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE. 



95 



exceeds the supply. We are in constant receipt of inquiries 
for men combining college training with practical experi- 
ence and natural ability. There appears to be no limit to 
the demand for the right kind of men and the compensation 
for such service is not exceeded in any other calling. In 
view of this demand for trained minds m the field of 
agriculture, students are urged to take a full four years' 
course, supplemented with extensive practical work and 
observation. To this end, a number of our best students 
have taken a term or a year out during their course on some 
of the best farms of this and other states; and others have 
secured employment in large dairy and horticultural estab- 
lishments where the most valuable practical experience can 
be acquired. The importance of this feature of preparation 
cannot be overestimated and it is urged and recommended 
even where young men are entirely familiar with ordinary 
agricultural work. It enables the student to derive more 
benefit from his course in college and fits him for a better 
and more lucrative position after graduation. 

AGRICULTURE. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 



Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2. (Animal Husb., IA.) 
Shop Work, 1. (Mechanical Engineering, XXXVII.) 

(Mathematics, XII.) 

(English, II.) 

(Elocution, I.) 

(Latin, I.) 

(Languages, I.) 

(Languages, V.) 

(History, I.) 

(Military, I.) 

erm. (Library, I.) 

^Optional. 



Algebra, 5. 






Elementary Rhetoric, 5. 


Elocution, 2. 






*Latin, 5, or 






French, 5, or 






German, 5. 






History, 5. 






Military Drill, 


2. 




Library Work, 


4 


hours i 



96 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 
SECOND TEEM. 



Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2. (Animal Husb., IIA) 
Horticulture, 3. (Horticulture, I.) 

Avanced Algebra and Plane Geometry, 

(Mathematics, XIII.) 
Elementary Botany, 2. (Botany, I.) 

Entomology, 2. (Zoology, I.) 

Advanced Rhetoric, 5. (English, HI.) 



Elocution, 1. 
*Latin, 5, or 
French, 5, or 
German, 5. 
History, 4. 
Military Drill, 2. 



(Elocution, II.) 

(Latin, II.) 

(Languages, II.) 

(Languages, VI.) 

(History, IIA.) 

(Military, II.) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



ElttST TERM. 



Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 4. (Animal Husb., 1 11 A.; 
Olericulture, 2. (Horticulture, V.; 

Solid Geometry and Plane Trigonometry, 5. 

(Mathematics, VI. 1 
Mechanics and Heat, 3. (Physics, V.; 

Botany, Ecology, 2. (Botany, II.. 

Vertebrate Zoology, 4. (Zoology, II.; 

Meteorology, 3. (Geology, 1. 

♦Composition, 1. (English, V. 

Military Drill, 2. (Military, 111. 

SECOND TERM. 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 4. (Animal Husb., IVA. 



Agricultural Physics, 2. 
Chemistry, 5. 
Farm Drainage, 2. 
Forestry, 2. 
Histology, 4. 
Invertebrate Zoology, 4. 



(Agriculture, II. 

(Agricultural Chemistry, I. 

(Agriculture, IV. 

(Horticulture, II. 

(Botany, III. 

(Zoology, III. 



♦Optional. 



Soil Physics, 2. 

Farm Dairying, 4. 
) l*i inciples of Breeding, 
) Pomology, 3. 
"hemistry, 4. 

Cryptogamic Botany, 4 



I»l VISION OF A.GBICULTUBE. 



97 



Ti imposition, 
Military Drill, 



(English, IV or VI.) 
(Military, IV.) 



* JUNIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 



Histology, 2. 
Physiology, 1. 
Shop Work, 1. 
Surveying, 4. 
Analytical Geometry, 5 
J hotography, 2. 
Physical Laboratory, 1 
Advanced Cryptogamic 
Economic Botany, 2. 
Economic Entomology, 
Embryology, 3 to 5. 
Geology, 5. 

'olitical Economy, 5. 
English Literature, 3. 
abating, 1. 
Elocution, 2. 
atin, 5, or 
rorman, 5, or 
lediaeval History, 5. 
Iilitary Science, 1. 



(Agriculture, III.) 

(Dairying, XIII.) 

(Animal Husbandry, VIII.) 

(Horticulture, IV.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, II.) 

4. (Botany, IV.) 
Elective. 

(Veterinary Science, XXX.) 

(Veterinary Science, XVII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXXVIII.) 

(Civil Engineering, VIII.) 

5. (Mathematics, VIII.) 
(Physics, IX.) 

1 or 2. (Physics, XIV.) 

Botany, 3. (Botany, VI.) 

(Botany, X.) 

5. (Zoology, IV.) 

(Zooiogy, V.) 

(Geology, II.) 

(Economic Science, I.) 

(Literature, 1.) 



I I OND TERM. 



arm Dairying, 
ffield Work, 2. 

I.) 
I 



(English, VII.) 

(Elocution, III.) 

(Latin, I.) 

(Languages, V.) 

(History, VA.) 

(Military, V.) 

(Dairying, XIV.) 
(Horticulture, VI.) 



nal. 

* lis! \lf e elch tl r ™\ r th ° £ tud e nt iH Permitted to select from 
m xl;l t( ™ a t H l ' m,er ° f studies aggregating not less 

tSZS-JKSfSZ RS y exercises each week - b 



each week, but 



98 



IOWA STATE rOLI/F.GE. 



Chemistry, 4. 

Bacteriology, 2. 

Public Speaking, 1. 

Live Stock Management, 2. 



(Agricultural Chemistry, III. 

(Botany, VII. 

(Elocution, VIII. 

(Animal Husbandry, VA. 



* Elective. 



Roads and Pavements, 2. 
Advanced Analytical Geometry, 
Vegetable Cytology, 3 or 5. 
Systematic Botany, 3 or 5. 
Animal Parasites, 2. 
Mineralogy, 4. 
Political Economy, 3. 
English Literature, 5. 
Elocution, 2. 
Latin, 5, or 
French, 5, or 
German, 5, or 
Modern History, 5. 
Military Science, 1. 



(Civil Engineering, XII. 

3. (Mathematics, XL 

(Botany, XIIJ 

(Botany, XV.] 

(Zoology, VIII. 

(Geology, VI. 

(Economic Science, II. 

(Literature, II. 

(Elocution, IV.; 

(Latin, II.) 

(Languages, II.] 

(Languages, VI. 

(History, VIA. 

(Military, VI. 



♦SENIOR YEAR. 
Group A. General Agriculture. 

FIRST TERM. 

Field Crops and Farm Management, 3. (Agriculture, V. 
Landscape Gardening, 2. (Horticulture, VIII. 

Chemistry, 4. (Agricultural Chemistry, IV 

Agrostology, 2. (Botany, XIII 

Elective. 

Dairy Bacteriology, 2. (Dairying, XV 

Dairying, 3. (Dairying, XVI 

Advanced Work In Live Slock ;iiid Score Card Practice, 2. 

(Animal Husbandry, VIA 
Chemistry, 4. (Agricultural Chemistry, VI 

*in the Senior year the student la permitted t<> select ■ 
any one of the groups In this course a number of studies i 
aggregating leas than sixteen, nor more than twenty exerciJ 
p r week each term, bul no agricultural study can be omitt 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE. 



99 



Comparative Physiology, 1. (Veterinary Science, XVII.) 

Anatomy of Domestic Animals, 3. 

(Veterinary Science, XXXI.) 



Principles of Horse Shoeing, 1. 
Sanitary Science, 2. 
Examination for Soundness, 2. 
Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5. 
Evolution of Plants, 1. 
Embryology, 3 to 5. 
Geology, 5. 
■ Political Economy, 3. 
Psychology, 5. 
Fiction. 3. 
Elocution, 2. 
Dration, 1. 
..atin, 4, or 
rfrman, 4, or 
French, 4. 
botanical Seminar, 1. 



(Veterinary Science, XLI.) 

(Veterinary Science, LIX.) 

(Veterinary Science, LX.) 

(Zoology, IX.) 

(Botany, XIX.) 

(Zoology, V.) 

(Geology, II.) 

(Economic Science, III.) 

(Philosophy, I.) 

(Literature, III.) 

(Elocution, V.) 

(Elocution, IX.) 

(Latin, III.) 

(Languages, VII.) 

(Languages, III.) 

(Botany, XVIII.) 



istory, Development of the United States, 5. 

(History, IIIA.) 

egetable Pathology, 2 or 5. (Botany, V.) 

(History, IIIA.) 
(Military, VII.) 



lilitary Science, 1. 



SECOND TERM. 



Meld Crops and Farm Management, 3. 

Ln 



umal Nutrition, 
'hesis, 1. 



(Agriculture, VI.) 
(Animal Husbandry, IX.) 



Elective. 



dairying. 3. (Dairying, XVII.) 

idvanced Work in Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 1. 

(Animal Husbandry, VII.) 
volution of Cultivated Plants, 1. (Horticulture, VII.) 

iterature of Horticulture, 1. (Horticulture, IX.) 

omparativc Physiology, 1. (Veterinary Science, XXXII.) 
rinciples of Horse Shoeing, 1. (Veterinary Science, LI.) 
I nitary Science, 2. (Veterinary Science, LXXI.) 



100 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Anatomy of Domestic Animals, 3. 

(Veteri 
Research in Horticulture, 2. 
Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5. 
Calculus, 5. 

Vegetable Physiology, 2 or 5. 
Evolution of Animals, 1. 
Geology, 5. 
Ethics, 3. 

American Literature, 3. 
Elocution, 1. 
History of Civilization. 5. 
Advanced Bacteriology, 3. 
Botanical Seminar, 1. 
Seeds and Seed Testing, 2. 
Military Science, 1. 



nary Science, XXXV 

(Horticulture, X, 

(Zoology, IX 

(Mathematics, IX 

(Botany, XI 

(Zoology, V 

(Geology, IS 

(Philosophy, I: 

(Literature, I\ 

(Elocution, V' 

(History, PV7i 

(Botany, XIII 

(Botany, XYIll 

(Botany, XPI 

(Military, VIII 



Groui' B. Dairying. 



FTRST TERM. 



Field Crops and Farm Management 

Dairy Bacteriology, 2. 

Dairying, 3. 

Landscape Gardening, 2. 

Chemistry, 4. 

Dairy Machinery, 1. 



(Agriculture, 

(Dairying, X 

(Dairying, XV) 

(Horticulture, VII 

(Agricultural Chemistry, I 

(Mechanical Engineering, X 



Elective. 

Additional Dairying, 4. (Dairying, 1 

Advanced Work in Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 

(Animal Husbandry, VI 
Chemistry, 4. (Agricultural Chemistry, V 

Anatomy of Domestic Animals, 3. 

(Veterinary Science, XX] 
Agrostology, 2. (Botany, XI 

anced Entomology, 3 /o 5. (Zoology. 9 

Geology, 5. (Geology, 

Political Economy, 3. (Economic Science 






XXXV 
lire, X 

an 

cs, IX 
ay, 3 
gy, VI 
gy, iv 

)liv, 
ire, 

on, VI 
y, IVA 
I 
XvIII 

y,xn 

7, VIII 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE. 

Psychology, 5. 

Fiction, 3. 

Elocution, 2. 

Dration, 1. 

Development of United States History, 5. 

Vlilitary Science, 1. 



II Field Crops and Farm Management, 3. (Agriculture, VI.) 

IV Dairying, 3. (Dairying, XVII.) 

Animal Nutrition, 5. (Animal Husbandry, IX.) 

Sanitary Science, 2. (Veterinary Science, LXX.) 

XIII Thesis. 1. 



ig ,XV 

■e, VII 
iry, I 

in? 



TO 

117,1 
try 



■jV, M 



101 

(Philosophy, I.) 
(Literature, III.) 
(Elocution, V.) 
(Elocution, IX.) 
(History, IIIA.) 
(Military, VII.) 



SECOND TERM. 



Elective. 



Advanced Work in Live Stock 

Evolution of Cultivated Plants, 
Literature of Horticulture, 1. 
Research in Horticulture, 2. 
Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5. 



and Score Card Practice, 1. 
(Animal Husbandry, VIIA.) 



XI n 



Calculus, 5. 
Advanced Bacteriology, 3. 
Evolution of Animals, 1. 
Geology, 5. 

thics, 3. 
American Literature, 3. 
Elocution, 1. 

istory of Civilization, 5. 
Military Science, 1. 



H 



a. i 



1. (Horticulture, VII.) 

(Horticulture, IX.) 

(Horticulture, X.) 

(Zoology, IX.) 

(Mathematics, IX.) 

(Botany, VIII.) 

(Zoology, VI.) 

(Geology, 

(Philosophy 

(Literature, 

(Elocution, 

(History, IVA.) 

(Military, VIII.) 



IV.) 
II.) 

IV.) 
VI.) 



Group C. Animal Husbandry. 



FIRST TERM. 



Advanced Work in Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2. 
I (Animal Husbandry, VIA.) 

pneld Crops and Farm Management, 3. (Agriculture, V.) 
.andscape Gardening, 2. (Horticulture, VIII.) 



102 IOWA vSTATE COLLEGE. 

Chemistry, 4. (Agricultural Chemistry, IV.) 

Anatomy of Domestic Animals, 3. 

(Veterinary Science, XXXI.) 
Principles of Horse Shoeing, 1. (Veterinary Science, XLI.) 
Sanitary Science, 2. (Veterinary Science, LIX.) 

Examinations for Soundness, 2. (Veterinary Science, LX.) 

Elective. 



Dairy Bacteriology, 2. (Dairying, XV.; 

Dairying, 3. (Dairying, XVI.] 

Comparative Physiology, 1. (Veterinary Science, XVIL 

Chemistry, 4. (Agricultural Chemistry, VII.. 

Materia Medica, 1. (Veterinary Science, XXIX. 

Vegetable Pathology, 2 or 5. (Botany, V.] 

Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5. (Zoology, IXflj 

Agrostology, 2. (Botany, XIII. 

Evolution of Plants, 1. (Botany, XIX. 

Embryology, 3 to 5. (Zoology, V. 

Geology, 5. (Geology, II., 

Political Economy, 3. (Economic Science, III. 

Psychology, 5. (Philosophy, I 

Fiction, 3. (Literature, III 

Elocution, 2. (Elocution, V 

Oration, 1. (Elocution, IX 

Latin, 4, or (Latin, III 

French, 4, or (Languages, III 

German, 4. (Languages, VII 
History, Development of United States, 5. (History, IIIA 

.Military Science, 1. (Military, VII 



SECOND TERM. 



Field Crops and Farm Management, 3. (Agriculture, VJ 
Animal Nutrition, 5. (Animal Husbandry, IX 

Advanced Worts in Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 1 

(Animal Husbandry, VI 
Anatomy of Domestic Animals, '.). 

(Veterinary Science, XXX> 
Principles of Horse Shoeing, I. (Veterinary Science, L 
Sanitary Science, 2. (Veterinary Science, LXX 



■- 






DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE. 103 

Evolution of Animals, 1. (Zoology, VI.) 

Thesis. 1. 

Elective. 

Dairying, 3. (Dairying, XVII.) 

Evolution of Cultivated Plants, 1. (Horticulture, VII.) 

literature of Horticulture, 1. (Horticulture, IX.) 

Research in Horticulture, 2. (Horticulture, X.) 

Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5. (Zoology, IX.) 

Sanitary Science, 2. (Veterinary Science, LXX.) 

omparative Physiology, 1. (Veterinary Science, XXXII.) 
Materia Medica, 1. (Veterinary Science, XXXIII.) 

lurisprudence, 1. (Veterinary Science, LXXIV.) 

lculus, 5. (Mathematics, IX.) 

I Advanced Bacteriology, 3. (Botany, VIII.) 

egetable Physiology, 2 or 5. (Botany, XI.) 

eology, 5. (Geology, IV.) 

Bj Ethics, 3. (Philosophy, II.) 

• American Literature, 3. (Literature, IV.) 

Elocution, 1. (Elocution, VI.) 

History of Civilization, 5. (History, IVA.) 

Military Science, 1. (Military, VIII.) 

Group D. Horticulture. 

FIRST TERM. 

Field Crops and Farm Management, 3. (Agriculture, V.) 
Greenhouse Management, 2. (Horticulture, III.) 

Landscape Gardening, 2. (Horticulture, VIII.) 

Chemistry, 4. (Agricultural Chemistry, IV.) 

Agrostology, 2. (Botany, XIII.) 

Elective. 
Dairying, S. (Dairying, XVI.) 

Advanced Work in Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2. 

(Animal Husbandry, VIA.) 
Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5. (Zoology, IX.) 

hemistry, 4. (Agricultural Chemistry, VII.) 

Anatomy of Domestic Animals, 3. 

(Veterinary Science, XXXI.) 
Seed Testing, 1. (Botany, XIV.) 

Vegetable Pathology, 2 or 5. (Botany, V.) 



104 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Embryology, 3 to 5. (Zoology, V.) 

Geology, 5. (Geology, II.) 

Psychology, 5. (Philosophy, 1.1 

Fiction, 3. (Literature, III.) 

Elocution, 2. (Elocution, V.j 

Oration, 1. (Elocution, IX.] 

Latin, 4, or (Latin, III.jj 

French, 4, or (Languages, III.) 

German, 4, or (Languages, VII.) 

History, Development of United States, 5 (History, IIIA. 

Botanical Seminar, 1. (Botany, X\ Am 

Evolution of Plants, 1. (Botany, XIX. 

Military Science, 1. (Military, VII.] 

SECOND TERM. 

Field Crops and Farm Management, 3. (Agriculture, VI, 
Animal Nutrition, 5. (Animal Husbandry, IX 



Literature, 1. 

Research, 2. 

Vegetable Physiology, 2 or 5. 

Evolution of Cultivated Plants, 1. 

Thesis, 1. 



(Horticulture, IX. 

(Horticulture, X. 

(Botany, XL' 

(Horticulture, VII. 



Elective. 



Dairying, 3. 

Advanced Work in Live 

Veterinary Medicine, 5. 

Calculus, 5. 

Advanced Bacteriology, 

Evolution of Animals, 

Advanced Entomology, 

Geology, 5. 

Ethics, 3. 

American Literature, 3 

Elocution, 1. 

History of Civilization, 

Botanical Seminar, 1. 

Military Science, 1. 



(Dairying, XVII 

Stock and Score Card Practice, 2 

(Animal Husbandry, VI IA 

(Veterinary Science, XXVIII 

(Mathematics, IX 



3. 


(Botany, VIII 


1. 


(Zoology, VI 


3 to 5. 


(Zoology, IX 




(Geology, IV 




(Philosophy, II 




(Literature, IV 




(Elocution, VI 


5. 


(History, IVA 




(Botany, XVIII 




(Military, VIII 



I) 



EXPERIMENT STATION 



106 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



STATION STAFF 



W. M. BEARDSHEAR, A. M., LL, D., 

President. 

*JAMES WILSON, M. S. A., 

C. F. CURTISS, B. Sc, M. S. A., 
Director and Agriculturalist. 

J. B. WEEMS, Ph. D., 
Chemist. 

L. H. PAMMEL, B. Ag., M. Sc., Ph. D., 
Botanist. 

H. E. SUMMERS, B. S., 
Entomologist. 

HOMER C. PRICE, M. S. A., 

Horticulturalist. 

W. J. KENNEDY, B. S. A., 
Animal Husbandry and "Vice Director. 

JOHN J. REPP. V. M. D., 

Veterinarian. 

G. L. McKAY, 
Dairying. 

JOSEPH J. EDGERTON, B. Ag,. 
Assistant in Agricultural Physics. 

P. W. BOUSKA, B. S. A., 

Assistant in Dairying and Dairy Bacteriologist. 

C. E. GRAY, B. S. A., 

Assistant Chemist. 



♦Granted indefinite leave of absence as Secretary of Ag' 
ture. 



ui- 



of A* 



EXPERIMENT STATION. 107 

CHARLOTTE M. KING, 

Artist. 

E. E. LITTLE, M. S. A., 

Assistant in Horticulture 

F. R. MARSHALL, B. S. A., 

Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 

C. LARSON, B. S. A., 

Assistant in Dairving. 

A. ESTELLA PADDOCK, B. Sc, 

Assistant in Botany. 

EXPERIMENT STATION. 

The investigations of the Experiment Station have an 
intimate relation to the college work of instruction, as the 
problems occupying the attention of the Station are those 
that have a material bearing on the profit of the farm, and 
they are also those that are timely, and in need of accurate 
investigation. Whether relating to the field or the feed lot, 
the aim is to investigate those questions which will have a 
practical relation to successful agriculture. Originality is 
made a feature of the work so far as it is consistent with 
useful results, and in all instances the sole object is to 
throw light on the truth relating to the various principles 
and practices of the farm. The field work strongly supports 
the instruction of the College in regard to the varieties of 
grains and the method of cultivation, thus enabling the 
student to become acquainted with the latest ideas relating 
to these. Thorough tests are made of the different varie- 
ties of fodders, grasses and grains. In addition to this, 
complete trials, embodying various crops and systems of 
culture, are carried on extensively each year, with the hope 
of giving direction to the farm management that is best for 
Iowa. 

The investigations with animals embrace a study of 
the value of different feeds for different features of animal 
production. The system of feeding, the preparation of 
different feeds are also made the subjects of investigation 



108 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

as far as it is thought they may be made a part of the 
methods of the Iowa farmer. Included with these, there 
have been a large number of trials with the different types i 
of animals suitable for the requirements of the market, j ' 
The object sought in this department of the Station work f 
has been to indicate the manner in which the Iowa farmeijj 
through the employment of animals can realize the mosi 
from his farm products and add to the fertility of the farm! 
The Experiment Station has reached out in this way to i 
remarkable degree, bringing sheep from Mexico, Colorado 
and Scotland, cattle from Texas and Great Britain, horses 
from Wyoming, Montana and Europe, in its endeavor t( 
thoroughly study this very important feature of the farm 
er's work. The data from these experiments is always ac* 
cessible to the student and he has the opportunity of daily 
observing aie development of it at every stage. 

The dairy industry is already indebted to the Experi 
ment Station for doing much towards establishing it on s 
surer foundation of accurate knowledge. The Station has 
always kept in closest touch with those engaged in th€ 
various lines of the dairy industry. Some of the problems 
which practical men are constantly meeting and asking aic 
in solving, are at all times objects of experiment by th< 
Dairy Section. The students have the advantage of seeing 
these experiments carried out, and in some cases assist ii 
the work themselves. In this way they learn not only wha 
are the chief problems to be solved but become informed 01 
the methods employed in different lines of investigation 
The experimental work that has been so far conducted, re 
lates mainly to the various problems of buttermakinj 
while lately features of cheesemaking have been made sut 
jects of special study. The records of these are abundantl 
used in class work, together with the results from the lat 
er investigations in the newer field of bacteriology. 

The Horticultural Department in its connection wit] 
the Experiment Station affords the student admirable oj 
portunities for checking the theory of the class roor 
against the practice of the field. The connection of th 



ec 

S. 



EXPERIMENT STATION. 109 

of i\ (Department of Horticulture with the State Horticultural 
; 3e flp ISociety is such that problems touching the commercial side 
ent ty K lot* fruit growing receive the closest attention. The field 
equipment of the Department is excellent, so that experi- 
ments in spraying for the prevention of fungous pests and 
injurious insects may be carried on under the eye of the 
student; this is true also of other phases of orchard routine, 
such as fertilizing, pruning and thinning. The experiment- 
al nursery work carried on is of decided educational value. 
In plant breeding, extensive experiments have been inau- 
gurated and are still in progress. The Station work thus 
equips the student with the practice and technique neces- 
sary to a thorough horticultural training. 



! mafo 
ion wot 
r a farms 
the mos 
the fan 
way tor 



i, horse 

avor ! 
he fan 
ways at 
of dail 



it 

tion ha 
[ in th 
roblem 
king ai 
by thi 
f seein 
ssist 
1}' fl 
med 
igatic 
ited, n 
makii 
,de silt 
ndantl 
tie J 

n wit 

bleoi 
rooi 
of tfi 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 



112 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



FACULTY 



W. M. BEARDSHEAR, A. M., LL. D., President. 
President of the College and Acting Dean. 

JOHN J. REPP, V. M. D., 

Professor of Pathology and Therapeutics. 

JOHN H. McNEALL, V. M. D., 
Professor of Anatomy and Principles and Practice of Surgery. 

CARL W. GAY, D. V. M., 
Professor of Veterinary Medicine and Sanitary Science. 

M. STALKER, M. Sc, V. S., 
Lecturer on Examination for Soundness. 

GEORGE JUDISCH, 
Director of the Hospital Dispensary and Lecturer on Pharmacy. 

ALFRED ALLEN BENNETT, M. Sc, 
Professor of Chemistry. 

LOUIS HERMAN PAMMEL, B. Ac, M. Sc, Ph. D., 
Professor of Botany and Bacteriology. 

HENRY E. SUMMERS, B. S., 
Professor of Zoology and Animal Parasites. 

CHARLES F. CURTISS, M. S. A., 

Professor of Principles of Breeding 

GEN. J. RUSH LINCOLN, 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

FRANK W. BOUSKA, M. S. A., 
Lecturer on Milk Inspection. 

MISS LOLA PLACEWAY, B. Sc, 
Instructor in Chemistry. 

OR A F. EDGETT, B. Sc, 
Instructor in Chemistry. 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE. 113 

MISS A. ESTELLA PADDOCK, B. Sc, 
Instructor in Botany. 

C. G. LEE, B. S., LL. D., 

Lecturer on Jurisprudence. 

MISS VINA ELETHE CLARK, 
Librarian. 

MISS OLIVE E. STEVENS, B. L., 

Assistant Librarian. 

DIVISION OF VETERINARY MEDICINE. 

The course in Veterinary Medicine is most thorough and 
complete and is equal to any offered in this branch of the 
Natural Sciences. A broad foundation is laid at the outset 
to enable the student to take a comprehensive and proper 
view of the subject. In the beginning of the course he is 
shown the relation existing between the three great king- 
doms of nature — animal, vegetable and mineral — and the 
biological and chemical forces that govern them, especially 
their application to animal life. With an understanding of 
the life, growth and existence of the normal animal, the 
student is then introduced to the various influences which 
operate to mar or disturb this condition, such as environ- 
ment, use, climatic conditions, and vegetable (bacteria and 
fungi) and animal parasites. The alterations produced in 
the tissues of the normal animal by these agencies, the 
disturbance of function which they, cause, and the power 
of medicines and surgical interference to afford relief are 
studied in detail. The relations existing between disease in 
animals and in man, and the several avenues of transmis- 
sion, are all given proper attention, and in the end the 
student is fitted not only to deal with the ordinary problems 
presented in veterinary practice, but also to work out and 
elucidate the complex and strange conditions so frequently 
met with. The treatment of sick and disabled animals is 
only a small part of the modern veterinarian's work; in 
fact, it is in the line of preventative medicine that he is 
able to render the most valuable service, and this course 



114 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

is designed to prepare the student to enter upon any part 
of this broad field of labor. 

The methods of instruction are such as to prevent 
superficial study and are calculated to give the student a 
thorough knowledge of the subject. Both the lecture and 
the text-book methods are used, and the class-room work 
is supplemented by practical work in the hospital and the 
clinics, and by systematic courses in the laboratories. Being 
so endowed as to be independent of student's fees for 
support the college is enabled to require only high attain- 
ments and ability on the part of the students without regard 
to numbers. 

The Veterinary Hospital and the daily free clinics fur- 
nish an abundance of material for practical work. Situated 
in an extensive stock-growing district, the College is espec- 
ially favored in this respect, not only horses, but all species 
of animals, being brought to the hospital for treatment. 
Senior students are assigned cases for diagnosis and treat- 
ment under the supervision of the clinical professor, thus 
having an opportunity to apply the theoretical knowledge 
obtained in the class-room. During the course opportunity 
is afforded to witness all the different surgical operations 
performed in veterinary surgery, together with the methods 
of treating the different internal diseases. Junior students 
are detailed in alphabetical order to assist the pharmacist in 
the compounding of prescriptions, in this way becoming 
familiar with the various forms in which medicines are 
administered. A detailed description of the various 
branches taught in the course is given on the succeeding 
pages. 

The department occupies quarters in Agricultural Hall. 
In this building are offices for the veterinary members of 
the Faculty, two large lecture rooms for the use of the 
department and a museum. 

The Veterinary Hospital is a substantial brick building 
three stories high, fitted witb commodious, well lighted 
single and box stalls, operating room, office and pharmacy, 
resident surgeon's room, dissecting room, an elevator for 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE. 115 

the accommodation of patients nnable to use the runway to 
second floor, and is furnished with all the surgical instru- 
ments of modern construction, operating table and other 
important conveniences for hospital work. A number of 
fine grass paddocks directly adjacent to the hospital are 
used for such patients as are likely to be benefitted by out- 
door exercise and a grass diet in the season. 

Aside from the facilities which belong especially to the 
Veterinary Department, the work in botany, chemistry, 
zoology, and other related studies is adequately provided 
for in the special buildings for the accommodation of these 
several departments of college work. 

A laboratory constituting part of the Experiment Sta- 
tion has recently been equipped. This laboratory is intended 
for the purpose of bacteriological and pathological investi- 
gation of the diseases of the domestic animals. It is sup- 
plied with the most modern biological apparatus, such as 
high power microscopes, incubators, hot air and steam ster- 
ilizers, microtomes, stains, gas, water and electric light, and 
in fact all first-class facilities for scientific investigation. 
Specimens are received frequently for examination. Stu- 
dents of the Veterinary Department may avail themselves 
of these facilities. 

COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OF THE DOMESTIC 
ANIMALS. 

DR. MCNEALL. 

This subject is studied through the entire Freshman 
and Junior years and embraces Descriptive and Practical 
Anatomy. 

Descriptive Anatomy is taught by a series of lectures 
including the study of the bones, articulations, muscles, 
circulatory apparatus, the nervous system, the respiratory 
system, the organs of digestion, the urino-genital apparatus, 
and the organs of special sense. The lectures are supple- 



116 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

merited by demonstrations from mounted skeletons, prepared 
specimens, charts and an Auzoux clastic model. 

Practical Anatomy comprises a comprehensive and thor- 
ough course in dissection, which extends through the Fresh- 
man and Junior years. During each year the student is 
required to make two complete dissections of the horse and 
such parts of other animals as may be deemed necessary. 
Freshman students devote their time in the dissecting room 
to the study of the bones, articulations and muscles. Junior 
siudents make special dissection of the nervous system, 
circulatory apparatus, lymphatic glands, organs of special 
sense and the organs contained in the abdominal and thora- 
cic cavities. The dissection is carried out in a systematic 
manner under the personal supervision and direction of the 
Professor of Anatomy. Bach student is required to properly 
dissect and pass an examination on the part assigned before 
passing to the dissection and study of another part. 

The subject is taught in four courses, as follows: 

Course XXXI. — First term, Freshman year, three 
lectures each week. 

Course XXXV. — Second term, Freshman year, three 
lectures each week. 

Course XXXIX. — First term, Junior year, three lec- 
tures each week. 

Course XLIX. — Second term, Junior year, three lec- 
tures each week. 

HISTOLOGY. 

This subject is taught throughout the Freshman year 
by one lecture and one laboratory exercise each week. 

Course XXX.— This is given during the first term of 
the Freshman year. The subject is taught chiefly in the 
laboratory. Descriptions of the microscopic structure of 
the tissues are given and the students are required to 
observe these features for themselves by the aid of the 
microscope. Students are taught how to collect, fix, imbed, 
section, stain, mount and preserve the normal tissues of 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE. 117 

the various species of domestic animals and to study them 
under the microscope. 

Course XXXIV. — A continuation of the subject in the 
second term of the Freshman year. Piersol's Histology is 
used. 

COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY. 

Physiology is studied by the comparative method, the 
vital functions of the different species of the domestic 
animals and those of the human body being compared and 
the common features and the variations pointed out. The 
subject is taught in four courses. 

Course XVII. — The physical and chemical laws, as they 
are related to physiology, and the general properties of 
animal cells, their origin, development and growth are 
studied in the first term of the Freshman year, one hour 
each week. 

Course XXXII. — This course is given in the second 
term of the Freshman year, one hour each week, and is a 
continuation of Course XVII. Both of these courses are 
introductory to Course XXXVIII and Course XLVIII. 

Course XXXVIII. — The study of the special physiology 
of the various organs and tissues is begun in the first term 
of the Junior year; two hours each week being given to the 
subject. 

Course XLVIII. — This course is a continuation of 
Course XXXVIII. It is given in the second term of the 
Junior year, two hours each week. 

"A Manual of Veterinary Physiology," by F. Smith, is 
used in these courses. 

PRINCIPLES OF BREEDING. 

PROFESSOR CURTISS. 

This course (Animal Husbandry V.), given in the first 
term of the Freshman year, embraces a study of the prin- 
ciples of breeding, including selection, heredity, atavism, 
v£ nation, fecundity, with a presentation of the methods of 



118 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

breeding, in-and-in breeding, cross breeding, etc., and a 
historical study of their results. In addition, the several 
features relating to the higher breeding of pure bred stock 
are made the subject of investigacion. 

STRUCTURAL BOTANY. 

PEOFESSOR PAMMEL. 

Course IX. — This course begins in the first term of the 
Freshman year. The work consists of recitations and lec- 
tures. The student is expected to become familiar with the 
morphology of flowering plants and the terms used in des- 
criptive botany. In the study of identification and selection 
of drugs it is necessary to have a thorough botanical knowl- 
edge of general structural botany as well as vegetable his- 
tology. Vegetable drugs do not always consist of the entire 
plant, but frequently of only parts. In this course the 
general structure of the plant, from the root to reproductive 
organs, is taken up and considered. In the laboratory the 
student takes up the histology of plants, especially from the 
standpoint of pharmacognosy, with a brief survey of the 
more important plants from a systematic standpoint. 

MATERIA MEDICA. 

This is taught throughout the Freshman year by one 
lecture per week. 

Course XXIX. — This study is entered upon at the be- 
ginning of the Freshman year. The subject is taught by a 
systematic course of lectures. Samples of the drugs and 
preparations discussed in the lectures are exhibited to the 
students who are required to inspect them in order to 
become intimately acquainted with the leading properties 
of the various drugs. The discussion includes all the 
preparations used in veterinary therapeutics. In order to 
connect this subject as closely as possible with therapeutics 
and to facilitate the study of that branch later on the same 
classification of drugs is followed as in the study of thera- 
peutics. Special lectures are devoted to an introduction to 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE. 119 

the subject dealing with classification and definition of 
terms. In case of each drug attention is called to the 
following features or such part of them as the character of 
the drug demands: Botanical name, natural order, habitat, 
description of properties, method of preparation, adultera- 
tions, names of therapeutic actions, preparations official in 
the United States Pharmacopoeia. 

Course XXXIII. — This is a continuation of the study 
throughout the second term of the Freshman year. 

PHARMACY. 

MR. JUDISCH. 

This subject is taken up in the first term of the Fresh- 
man year and continued throughout the year. It consists 
of lectures and laboratory work. 

Course XL. — All the official drugs and preparations are 
considered. Special attention is paid to practical pharma- 
ceutical problems and manipulations. Each student is 
required to prepare at least one of each class of the official 
preparations. This course is given in the first term of the 
Freshman year and consists of one lecture and one labora- 
tory exercise each week. 

Course XXXVII. — In the second term of the Freshman 
year one lecture and one laboratory exercise each week are 
devoted to the principles and practical work of the com- 
pounding of prescriptions. 

THERAPEUTICS. 

DR. REPP. 

This subject is taught by one lecture per week through- 
out the Junior and the Senior year. 

Course XLIV. — This is begun at the opening of the 
first term of the junior year. It is taught by a systematic 
course of lectures, but is supplemented by text book read- 
ing by the student. This course is largely made up of the 
general consideration of the subject including such topics 
as: Definition of terms, manner of administration, modes of 



120 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

absorption, channels of elimination, effects of drugs, agen- 
cies which modify the action of drugs. There is then tak- 
en up a study of the individual drugs. The discussion of 
each drug is taken up at the point where it was laid down in 
materia medica. The drugs are classified according to 
their dominant action into systematic and extraneous rem- 
edies; the systematic remedies are divided into two class- 
es, viz: Local remedies and general remedies. Each drug 
is studied according to the following outline: Pharmaceu- 
tical name, physiological action on the various tissues and 
organs, therapeutic action, toxic action and antidotes, 
methods of administration, contraindications and dosage. 
This course is supplemented by a consideration of the sub- 
ject of prescription-writing. 

Course XXXVI. — A continuation of the subject 
throughout the second term of the junior year. 

Course LXII. — A continuation of the subject through- 
out the first term of the senior year. 

Course LXXII. — A continuation of the subject through- 
out the second term of the senior year. 

H. C. Wood's "Therapeutics, Its Principles and Prac- 
tice" is used as a text book. 

PATHOLOGY. 

DR. REPP. 

This is taught by two lectures per week throughout the 
junior and the senior year and one laboratory exercise per 
week during the junior year. 

Two subdivisions of the subject are made, viz: Gen- 
eral Pathology and Special Pathology. In connection with 
each morbid process the pathological anatomy both macro- 
scopic and microscopic, the morbid physiology and etiology 
are considered. The subject is taught by lectures. The 
diseases of domestic animals are made the basis of the 
work. The discussions are confined strictly to animal path- 
ology. 

COURSE XTJTT.— This is taken up during the first term 
of the junior year. It consists in a study of the elementary 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE. 121 

morbid processes, viz: The infiltrations, degenerations, 
atrophy, hypertrophy, necrosis, gangrene, hyperaemia, 
ischemia, thrombosis, embolism, hemorrhage, infraction. 

Course L1I. — This is presented during the second 
term of the junior year. It completes the study of general 
pathology by a consideration of the composite morbid pro- 
cesses, viz: Inflammation, including the chronic specific 
inflammations, regeneration, and tumor formation. Also 
the study of special pathology, that is, the consideration of 
diseases which occur in the individual tissues and organs, 
is begun. 

Course LXI. — This continues the study of special 
pathology throughout the first term of the senior year. 

Course LXXII. — This continues the study of special 
pathology throughout the second term of the senior year. 

Microscopic pathology is taught in the laboratory dur- 
ing the junior year in connection with Courses XLIII and 
LII. The students are taught to collect, fix, imbed, section, 
stain, mount and preserve pathological specimens and to 
determine their characters under the microscope. Gross 
morbid anatomy is taught by autopsy and by the presenta- 
tion to the students of both fresh and preserved specimens. 

Stengel's "A Text-book of Pathology" and Priedberger 
and Frohner's "Pathology and Therapeutics" are used for 
reference. 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR SUMMERS. 

This course (Zoology I), given during the second term 
of the Freshman Year, is designed as an introduction to 
Zoological methods, especially to those of Systematic Zoo- 
logy. The student also gets practice in the determination 
of insects, which is of special use later in his study of tne 
parasites of domestic animals. Some training is had in the 
use of the microscope. The lectures deal chiefly with the 
physiology and life history of Me different orders of insects. 



122 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Incidentally the general principles involved in dealing with 
injurious insects, including parasites, are discussed. 

CHEMISTRY. 

PROFESSOR BENNETT. 

For description of work done in this subject see Courses 
I, IV, X and XIII under Chemical Department in the Divi- 
sion of Sciences as Related to the Industries. 

Laboratory study is the basis of the work done in 
chemistry. The student is given an opportunity during the 
first year of the Veterinary Course to become acquainted 
with Inorganic Chemistry and the general principles of 
Qualitative Analysis. Special attention is given to those 
compounds that are important in Veterinary Medicine. 
Attention is also given to inorganic poisons and the general 
effects of these poisons on the animal body. 

During the first term of the Junior Year the students 
in Veterinary Medicine are given a course in Organic 
Chemistry in which they become acquainted with the vari- 
ous hydro-carbons, carbo-hydrates, and nitrogenous com- 
pounds, special attention being directed to those substances 
used in pharmaceutical preparations. 

During the second term of the Junior year the student 
studies elementary Physiological Chemistry and a sufficient 
amount of the general principles of Qualitative Analysis to 
enable him to make complete analysis of urine. 

The laboratory provides each student with a separate 
table which is furnished with water, gas, and all the needed 
apparatus and re-agents. The cost of this work to tne stu- 
dent is the cost of the material and apparatus consumed 
or destroyed in the prosecution of the study. 

BACTERIOLOGY. 
PROFESSOR PAMMEL. 

Course VII. — This subject is taken up in the first term 
of the Junior Year, and is conducted by laboratory work and 
lectures, covering approximately the following ground: 

History. Considering the subject from Leewenhoek's 
discovery In L659, followed by the work of Plenciz who 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE. 123 

assumed a casual relation between micro-organism and 
contagious diseases. The works of Pollender, Davaine, 
Henle and Pasteur. Theory of fermentation, Cagniard, 
Latour and Schwann, Bastian's theory of spontaneous gen- 
eration; Pasteur's refutation; DeBary's work and higher 
fungi. The extravagant claims of Hallier and others. 
Lister's antiseptic treatment of wounds. The work of 
Cohn, Naegeli, Klebs, Pasteur, Buchner, Brefeld and Koch 
in cultivating germs. Rapid progress in recent times. 
Anthrax, tuberculosis and germs in pus. Literature on 
the subject. 

What are bacteria? Structure, growth, nutrition and 
reproduction. 

Morphology and systematic position of bacteria. Their 
relation to other plants. Classification of Ehrenberg, of 
Cohn, of DeBary, of Van Tiegham, of Pasteur, of Flugge, of 
Zopf. Difficulties in classifying bacteria. Physiological 
and morphological characters. Methods of sterilization, 
mounting, staining and inoculation. 

History of anthrax, symptomatic anthrax, malignant 
oedema, tetanus, glanders, tuberculosis, swine plague, hog 
cholera, typhoid fever, diphtheria. The germs of pus, ery- 
sipelas, yellow fever, cholera, cholera nostras, caries of 
teeth, etc., are discussed. The characteristic growth and 
the morphological characters of the germs are given. The 
formation of ptomaines and enzymes and their relation to 
disease. 

Abbott's "Principles of Bacteriology" is used as a text 
book. 

This course consists of seventeen lectures accompanied 
by seventeen laboratories of two hours each. 

VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR SUMMERS. 

This course (Zoology II), given during the first term 
of the Junior Year, consists mainly of a laboratory study of 
the anatomy, including histology, of a typical vertebrate. 
This serves as an introduction to the methods of gross 



124 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

dissection, and gives practice in the use of the microscope. 
The study of a series of other forms of vertebrates follows, 
leading to a knowledge of general vertebrate structure. The 
laboratory work is supplemented by lectures on the general 
morphology, physiology and classification of vertebrates. 

ANIMAL PARASITES. 

PEOFESSOR SUMMERS. 

In the second term of the Junior Year is given a course 
(Zoology VIII), of lectures upon the Zoo-parasites of domes- 
tic animals. Detailed descriptions are given of the life his- 
tories of the most important species attacking animals in 
the United States, special emphasis being laid upon such 
portions of their economy as may render them open to 
treatment by preventative or remedial measures. 

POISONOUS PLANTS. 

PROFESSOR PAMMEL. 

Course XVI. — The veterinarian is frequently called on 
to investigate poisoning. He should therefore be familiar 
with the plants responsible for poisoning live stock. In 
this course the subject is treated from the historical stand- 
point, with a brief reference to the history of toxicology; 
auointoxication; poisoning from ptomaines, toxines and the 
agents responsible for such poisoning; poisoning by fungi, 
like toadstools, ergot, etc. Dwelling on the life history of 
these fungi and the poisons they produce; the rusts and 
smuts, as possible causes of disease. The higher plants 
arc then taken up in a systematic order, calling attention to 
the poisonous plants in the various orders and means for 
recognizing these plants. Lectures and laboratory work. 
Two hours. Second term, Freshman Year. 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE. 125 

THEORY AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE. 

DR. GAY. 

Course XLV. — This course is given during the first term 
of the Junior Year and consists of three lectures each week 
on the methods of Clinical Diagnosis, supplemented by- 
demonstrations in the hospital and clinics. Correct diagno- 
sis being a first essential in the treatment of disease, the 
subject is exhaustively considered. The several appara- 
tuses of the animal body are taken up separately and the 
student is taught to recognize the various disturbances of 
function and the diseases or pathological conditions they 
indicate. 

Course LIV. — During the second term of the Junior 
year three lectures are given each week on the sporadic or 
non-infectious diseases of the domestic animals. Each dis- 
ease is compared with the similar affection in man, its 
etiology, pathology, symptoms, course, diagnosis, progno- 
sis and treatment are considered in detail, the differences 
peculiar to each species being pointed out. It is the object 
to teach the student to recognize not only the symptoms 
of the disease, but also the alterations in the tissues which 
produce these symptoms, thus fitting him to more success- 
fully prescribe proper treatment, to modify his treatment to 
meet the demands of each individual case, and to recognize 
and properly treat atypical cases. The daily clinics and the 
hospital afford cases for practical demonstration. 

Course LXIII: — In the first term of the Senior year 
three lectures each week are devoted to the study of the 
non-micro-organismal constitutional diseases and the dis- 
eases caused by animal parasites. 

Course LXXV. — The infectious and contagious diseases 
of the domestic animals are studied in the second term of 
the Senior Year. Three lectures are given each week on 
this subject. The characters of the germ causing the dis- 
ease, the species of animal attacked, the transmissibility to 
man, the pathological lesions produced, the symptoms, 
course, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment, are considered 
in connection with each disease. 



126 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF SURGERY. 

DR. MCNEALL. 

This subject is taught to Junior and Senior students in 
four courses, as follows: 

Course XLVI. — First term, Junior Year, three lectures 
each week. 

Course LV. — Second term, Junior Year, three hours 
each week. 

Course LXIV. — First term, Senior Year, three hours 
each week. 

Course LXXVI. — Second term, Senior year, three hours 
each week. 

General and Special Surgery is taught in the Junior 
and the Senior Year, the didactic lectures being supple- 
mented by demonstrations in the clinics. 

General Surgery embraces the following subjects: Sur- 
gical bacteriology, the pathology and treatment of inflamma- 
tion, diseases of the bones, nerves, articulations, muscles, 
tendons, tendon sheaths and bursae; methods of amputation 
and exarticulation; suturing and the general treatment of 
wounds; methods of anaesthesia; intra-venous and sub- 
cutaneous injections; castration; methods of restraint in 
securing animals, and the methods of actual cautery. 

Special Surgery includes the surgical diseases of the 
head, neck, thorax, abdomen, urino-genital organs, forelimb, 
hind-limb, vertebrae, pelvis, and the surgical diseases of the 
stomach and bowels. 

PRACTICAL OPERATIVE SURGERY. 

DR. MCNEALL. 

In the course in Operative Surgery the student is re- 
quired to perform all the operations that are found neces- 
sary in veterinary practice. Five hours each week are de- 
voted to this work. The subject is covered in two courses, 
as follows: 

Course LXV.- First term. Senior year. 

COURSE LXXVIi. — Second term, Senior Year. 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE. 127 

EMBRYOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR SUMMERS. 

The foundation of this course (Zoology V), consists of 
laboratory work on the chick and to a smaii extent on the 
frog. The lectures deal with the general principles of devel- 
opment, including the structure of the germ cells, matura- 
tion and fertilization, and the modifications of cleavage and 
gastrulation found in the different classes of vertebrates. 
The peculiarities of the development of mammals are also 
discussed. 

OBSTETRICS. 

The course in Embryology given during the first term 
of the Senior Year is introductory to this subject. 

Course LXX. — The study of this subject is taken up 
during the second term of the Senior Year and is taugnt 
by a course of two lectures per week. It includes a review 
of obstetrical anatomy, reproduction, hygiene of pregnant 
animals, pathology of gestation, normal parturition, dysto- 
kia, obstetric operations, accidents of parturition, pathology 
of parturition, diseases of the young animals. The students 
are instructed in the use of the various instruments and 
appliances used in obstetrical practice. The location of the 
veterinary school in a rich stock-breeding community gives 
opportunity for considerable practical work. 

Fleming's "Obstetrics" is used for reference. 

PRINCIPLES OF HORSE-SHOEING. 

Course XLI. — In the first term of the Junior Year one 
.tour each week is devoted to the study of the anatomy a 
physiology of the hoof, the relation between the form of the 
hoof and the direction of the limb, the variations in the 
flight of the hoof, the shoeing of normal and irregular hoofs, 
winter shoeing and hoof nurture. 

Course LI. — In the second term of the Junior Year the 
correction of defects in gait and the methods of shoeing 



128 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

hoofs defective in form or diseased are taken up, one hour 
each week being devoted to the subject. 

"A Text Book on Horse-Shoeing," by Lungwitz, trans- 
lated by Adams, is used in these courses. 

DENTISTRY. 

Course LVIII. — This is taken up during the first term 
of the Senior Year, the instruction being comprised of one 
lecture per week. It embraces a series of lectures cover 
ing the anatomy of the organs of mastication especially 
the teeth, eruption of the teeth, their abnormalities, irreg- 
ularities, diseases of the teeth and alveoli and treatment foi 
the same. The clinics at the veterinary hospital give the 
student ample practice in operative dentistry on the domes 
tic animals. 

SANITARY SCIENCE. 

In the modern system of medicine the prevention oi 
disease has taken a prominent place, and in this field the 
veterinarian is called upon to prevent the spread of dis- 
ease not only from animal to animal but from animal to 
man and from man to man. The courses prescribed below 
are designed to prepare the student for this important work. 

Course LIX. — Two lectures are given each week in the 
first term of the Senior Year. The following topics are 
discussed: The great plagues of history, and their sani- 
tary lessons; the various causes of disease; the manner in 
which disease is propagated and spread, including the part 
played by meat and milk; the influence of soil, configura 
tion and climatic conditions; the effect of environment 
including the ventilation, lighting and drainage of stables; 
preventative measures, including disinfection, vaccination 
and quarantine. 

Coubse LXXI. — In the second term of the Senior Yeai 
the various infectious, contagious and parasitic diseases arc 
separately considered and tue methods of preventing their 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE. 129 

ntroduction and suppresssing outbreaks is discussed, two 
ectures being given each week. 

MEAT INSPECTION. 



This comparatively new branch of veterinary work is 
iven the attention which its present importance deserves. 
The subject is approached from the American point of 
dew, and the students are taught how to perform the 
,vork with that rapidity and thoroughness required by the 
U. S. Bureau of Animal Industry. The instruction which 
he student receives in the courses in anatomy, physiology, 
mthology, bacteriology, animal parasites and veterinary 
nedicine makes it possible to cover this subject in the two 
ourses described below: 

Course LVII. — One lecture is given each week in the 
irst term of the Senior Year, embracing the following 
opics: The physical characters of normal flesh and or- 
rans; the methods of slaughter; the principles of refrigera- 
ion and preservation; and the effect of accidental and 
>athological conditions on the preservation and edibility of 
neats. 

Course LXVIII. — In the second term of the Senior 
fear one lecture each week is devoted to the consideration 
)f the putrefaction of meats and the consequences of the 
ngestion of such meats by man; the effects upon the meat 
)f the various constitutional ana infectious diseases; the 
ransmissibility of the disease to man; the effects of cook- 
ng on transmissibility; the meat inspection laws of the 
'nited States. 

MILK INSPECTION. 

MR. BOUSKA. 

This course (Dairy XVIII), given in the second term 
>f the Senior Year, takes up the composition of normal milk 
ind its variations, the Babcock method for finding the 
imoimt of tmtterfat; the use of the lactometer for finding 
he specific gravity and calculating the milk solids; the 



130 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

common adulterations of milk and their detection. Suf 
cient practice will be given to enable the student to becoi 
familiar with the use and application of these tests. 

EXAMINATION FOR SOUNDNESS. 

DR. STALKER. 

Course LX. — In this course, which is given in the firi 
term of the Senior Year, the student is taught how to ma 
a systematic search for disease or pathological conditio 
the various conditions likely to be found in each part a 
the effect they may have on the use of the animal. T 
lectures are given each week, supplemented by demonstri 
tions on the living animal. 

JURISPRUDENCE. 

MR. LEE. 



Course LXXIV. — The work in this course consists ( 
a study of the rights and duties of the veterinary pract 
tioner; the rights and duties of the owner or value < 
domestic animals; contracts and sales as applied to dealinj 
in live stock; the subject of expert testimony. One lectu 
is given each week in the second term of the Senior Year. 

CLINICS. 

]>KS. MCNEALL AND GAY. 

The practical work afforded by the clinics is considei 
a highly essential part of the instruction given to the s 
d i. A student's didactic instruction will do him but lit 
good if at the same time he is not required to put 
knowledge Into practice. Also a student shows his fitn 
for membership in the profession chiefly by the degree 
.-Lptiifss which he exhibits in his practical work. The c 
Leal training which he gets here gives him an opportuij 
in acquire the aptitude which is requisite for his profess! 
al work. Free; Hinirs arc held in the hospital every J 






ti; 



from I to 3 o'clock P. M. The cases brought to the hosfilj 



I 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE. 131 

'or treatment are assigned to the senior students in alpha- 
betical order and the students are required to prepare a 
nil report of their examination, diagnosis, and proposed 
reatment and hand it to the clinician when he comes to ex- 
imine the case. These reports are then graded by the 
•linician according to their merits. The hospital cases are 

ned to the senior students who are required to treat 
hem and keep a careful report of the case under the direc- 
ion and supervision of the clinical instructors. The junior 
tudents are required to assist the seniors in their clinical 
'nd hospital work. The term grades of the students are 
hade up from their attendance, and character of their clini- 
al and hospital work. The clinical professor upon exam- 
cation of the case or performance of an operation or ad- 
ministration of internal treatment gives to the students a 
linical lecture upon the various aspects of the case before 
hem. In this exhaustive way each case is made to yield 
he utmost good to the student. Animals of all species are 

jht in considerable numbers to the hospital from the 
urrounding excellent stock-growing territory and in this 
ay the students come into intimate contact with a great 
ariety of diseases, and acquire a familiarity with their 
•<\atment such as will enable them to give good service 
> their clients immediately upon their entrance into prac- 
ce. 



side' 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 

wnparative Anatomy, 3. (Veterinary, XXXI) 

istology, 2. (Veterinary, XXX) 

omparative Physiology, 1. (Veterinary, XVII) 

rtnciples of Breeding, 2. (Animal Husbandry, VIII.) 

ateria Medica. 1. (Veterinary, XXIX) 

macy, 2. (Veterinary, XT,) 

tructural Botany, 3. (Botany, IX) 



132 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Inorganic Chemistry, 3. 
Military Drill, 2. 



(Chemistry, I 
(Military, 1 



SECOND TEEM. 



Comparative Anatomy, 3. 

Histology, 2. 

Comparative Physiology, 1. 

Materia Medica, 1. 

Pharmacy, 2. 

Inorganic Chemistry, 3. 

Poisonous Plants and Fungi, 

Entomology, 2. 

Military Drill, 2. 



(Veterinary, XXXV] 
(Veterinary, XXXIV] 
(Veterinary, XXXI )] 
(Veterinary, XXXII 
(Veterinary, XXXVI 
(Chemistry, HI 
(Botany, XVI | 
(Zoology, 
(Military, 11 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



FIRST TEEM. 



Comparative Anatomy, 3. 

Comparative Physiology, 2. 

Therapeutics, 1. 

General Pathology, 3. 

Bacteriology, 2. 

Theory and Practice of Medicine, 

Principles and Practice of Surgery, 

Clinics, 12. 

Principles of Horse Shoeing, 1. 

Zoology, 4. 

Organic Chemistry, 3. 

Military Drill, 2. 



(Veterinary, XXXI 
(Veterinary, XXXVI 
(Veterinary, XDI 
(Veterinary, XDI 
(Botany, V 
3. (Veterinary, XI 
3. (Veterinary, XL i] 
(Veterinary, XL\I 
(Veterinary, XI 
(Zoology, f 
(Chemistry 
(Military, 



SKCONI) TKRM. 



Comparative Anatomy, 3. 
Comparative Physiology, 2. 



(Veterinary, 
(Veterinary, XI A 



tti 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE. 



133 



1 lerapeutics, 1. 
meral Pathology, 3. 
leory and Practice of Medicine, 3. 
inciples and Practice of Surgery, 3. 
inics, 12. 

inciples of Horse Shoeing, 1. 
dmal Parasites, 2. 
ysiological Chemistry, 3. 
litary Drill, 2. 



XVII 

t.h 

, XVI 
Ogy 

ary, I 



(Veterinary, XXXVI) 

(Veterinary, LI I) 

(Veterinary, LIV) 

(Veterinary, LV) 

(Veterinary, LVI) 

(Veterinary, LI) 

(Zoology, VIII) 

(Chemistry, XIII) 

(Military, IV) 



SENIOR YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



erapeutics, 1. 

ecial Pathology, 2. 

eory and Practice of Medicine, 3. 

nciples and Practice of Surgery, 3. 

srative Surgery, 5. 

nics, 12. 

2. 

1. 



^■litary Science 



^1 at Inspection 
rr Lbryology, 3. 

, ;] itistry, 1. 



any J 

ry.XIi 1 
v, XLl 



rimination for Soundness, 2. 



SECOND TERM. 



erapeutics, 1. 

cial Pathology, 2. 
- ^ory and Practice of Medicine, 3. 

nciples and Practice of Surgery, 3 

rative Surgery, 5. 

lies, 12. 

itary Science, 2. 

it Inspection, 1. 
^Jk Inspection, 2. 

tetrics, 2. 

isprudence, 1. 



litary. 



viYl 



(Veterinary, LXII) 

(Veterinary, LXI) 

(Veterinary, LXIII) 

(Veterinary, LXIV) 

(Veterinary, LXV) 

(Veterinary, XLII) 

(Veterinary, LIX) 

(Veterinary, LVII) 

(Zoology, V) 

(Veterinary, LVIII) 

(Veterinary, LX) 



(Veterinary, LXXIII) 

(Veterinary, LXXII) 

(Veterinary, LXXV) 

(Veterinary, LXXVI) 

(Veterinary, LXXVI I) 

(Veterinary, L) 

(Veterinary, LXXI) 

(Veterinary, LXVIID 

(Dairying, XVIII) 

(Veterinary, LXX) 

(Veterinary, LXXIv) 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
CIVIL ENGINEERING. 
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 
MINING ENGINEERING. 
CERAMICS. 
TECHNOLOGY. 



136 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



FACULTY 



W. M. BEARDSHEAR, A. M., LL. D., 

President. 

GEORGE WELTON BISSELL, M. E., 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

ANSON MARSTON, C. E., 
Professor of Civil Engineering. 

LOUIS BEVIER SPINNEY, B. M. E., 

Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering. 

SAMUEL WALKER BEYER, Ph. D., 
Professor of Geology and Mining. 

WARREN H. MEEKER, M. E., 
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

BURTON S. LANPHEAR, M. M. E., 
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

C. W. J. NEVILLE, M. C. E., 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

MISS ELMINA T. WILSON, C. E., 
Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

TALBOT LENNOX. 
Instructor in Machine Shop. 

EZRA C. POTTER, 

Instructor in Pattern Shop. 

EDWIN CLARK BOUTELLE, B. M. E., 

Instructor in Forge and Foundry. 

IRA A. WILLIAMS, B. So., 
Instructor in Geology and Mining. 

E. B. TUTTLE, B. S. in E. E., 
Instructor in Physics. 

WILBUR M. WILSON, B. M. E., 
Instructor In Free-Hand and Mechanical Drawing. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 137 

LOUIS EMANUEL YOUNG, B. M. E., 

Instructor in Mining Engineering. 

EDGAR WILLIAM STANTON, M. Sc., 
Professor of Mathematics and Economic Science. 

GEN. JAMES RUSH LINCOLN, 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

ALFRED ALLEN BENNETT, M. Sc., 
Professor of Chemistry. 

MISS LIZZIE MAY ALLIS, M. A., 

Professor of French and German. 

ALVIN B. NOBLE, B. Ph., 
Professor of Literature and Rhetoric. 

ADRIAN M. NEWENS, B. O., 
Professor of Elocution and Associate in English. 

ORANGE HOWARD CESSNA, A. M., D. D., 

Professor of History and Philosophy. 

MISS MARIA M. ROBERTS, B. L., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS LOLA A. PLACE WAY, B. Sc., 
Instructor in Chemistry. 

MISS BESSIE B. LARRABEE, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS ELIZABETH MACLEAN, M. Di., 
Instructor in English. 

ERNEST ALANSON PATTENGILL, B. S., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS JULIA COLPITTS, M. A., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS HELEN G. REED, Ph. B., 
Instructor in English. 

MISS ADA J. MILLER. Ph. B., 
Instructor in English. 

MISS ORA P. EDGETT, B. Sc, 
Instructor in Chemistry. 



138 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

JULIA A. STANTON, B. L., 

Instructor in History. 

MISS VINA ELETHE CLARK, 

Librarian. 

MISS OLIVE E. STEVENS, B. L. 
Assistant Librarian. 



NON RESIDENT LECTURERS. 

M. J. RIGGS, M. Am., Sc, C. E., 

Manager Toledo Branch American Bridge Co., Toledo, Ohio. 
Construction and Operation of Modern Bridge Plants. 

W. J. KARNER, C. E., Chicago, Illinois, 
Assistant to Chief Engineer Illinois Central Railway Co. 
An Engineer In Mexico. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 



The work of the Division of Engineering of the College 
is apportioned among four departments, viz: 

The Department of Mechanical Engineering. 

The Department of Civil Engineering. 

The Department of Electrical Engineering. 

The Department of Mining Engineering. 

Through these departments the College offers systema 
tic courses in Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering 
Electrical Engineering and Mining Engineering, each lead 
ing to its appropriate degree. 

These several courses are planned with a view to fitting 
pursuing them to enter professional engineering wort 
;i!id to advance therein more rapidly than would be possible 
without the preparation furnished by a College course 
Experience shows that the graduates from technical schooli 
generally excel in their chosen work, and it is worthy o 






DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 139 

iote in this connection that railroads,* manufactories and 
jther corporations, as well as municipalities and govern- 
nent departments, are today demanding that those who 
>eek promotion in their technical departments shall have 
secured a technical training such as can now be obtained 
in the engineering schools of the country. 

It is very manifest that no college course in engineer- 
ing can promise to a student the training and experience 
in all the details of his profession, because of the lack of 
Itiiue in the course, the multiplicity of general subjects 
which must be emphasized and the lack of uniformity of 
details in the profession due to the local and personal dnf er- 
ences which exist in the conduct of engineering work of 
all kinds. Moreover it seldom happens that a student in 
college knows definitely what specific branch of his chosen 
•profession he will follow, and it would be folly for him to 
spend his time on details which he may never use. A 
thorough education in the branches of pure and applied 
science which are related to professional work is essential. 
Having this the engineer readily acquires familiarity with 
the details of his work. Without it no amount of exper- 
ience with details alone can give an engineer high rank in 
his profession. 

Therefore it is believed that a college course in engin- 
eering should be in the first place a training of the mind 
of the student toward ability to think logically, to observe 
accurately and by the application of the former acquire- 
ment to the latter to reach correct inferences; in the second 
place such a course should acquaint the student with ap- 
proved methods of draughting and computing, with the use 
and limits of the instruments employed in the everyday 
work of his profession and should give him an opportunity 
for experimental work bearing upon engineering problems. 
In the third place such a course should provide that the 



*A prominent railway company has offered to take each 
year, a graduate of the Department of Mechanical Engineering 
of this College as an apprentice in its motive power department. 



140 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

student acquire the art of expressing his thoughts in gooc 
English, in public and in private, and thereby dignify him 
self as a member of society and his profession as a facto) 
in the progress of the world. 

In accordance with the views above expressed the en 
gineering courses offered at this College include as a foun 
dation a rigid and vigorous course in mathematics, pure anc 
applied, extending through nearly four years. Parallel 
with the mathematics are carried, first, a course in Eng 
lish and French or German culminating in the seminal 
work of the last year; the French or German serves the 
double purpose of giving access to foreign technical liter 
ature and of assisting in the English; second, a course ir 
chemistry arranged especially with reference to engineer 
ing and industrial work; third, a course in physics, at first 
mainly class room work, later consisting principally of lab- 
oratory work adapted to the engineering courses and lastly 
the practical or applied work peculiar to the several 
courses, involving draughting, designing, engineering lab- 
oratory, field or shop worK and thesis. 

mathematics. — The study of Mathematics begins iD 
the Academic Year and extends through the Sophomore 
Year. 

Advanced algebra, plane and solid geometry, plane trig- 
onometry, analytical geometry and calculus are included 
in this course. 

applied mathematics, e. g., analytical mechanics and 
hydraulics are studied in the Junior and Senior Years. 

language and economic science. — \v hile it is admitted 
in a general way that in a technical course the student 
should direct his attention largely to studies having a direct 
bearing upon his specialty, yet it is believed advisable that 
in so far as is consistent with his other work, he should se- 
cure training in the use of ine English language, and if pos- 
sible, an intruduction to literature as well as modern lan- 
guages and the general sciences. 

To this end English is placed among the required 
studies in the Freshman and Sophomore Years, French or 






DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 141 

German in the Freshman Year and economnc science in 
the Junior Year. 

chemistry. — With the rapid increase in the application 
of both chemistry and engineering to the arts, as in electro- 
lytic treatment of ores, the refining of metal, the manufac- 
ture of cement and in many other industrial operations, the 
subject of chemistry has an important place in the train- 
3ng ing of engineers. 

A knowledge of Inorganic Chemistry is especially use- 

The study of Chemistry is pursued in the first and sec- 
ond terms of the Sophomore Year of this course. 

The text-book work extends through the year and par- 
allel thereto is a course in laboratory work, wherein the 
student becomes familiar with the general laboratory 
methods for qualitative analysis. 

physics. — The course in Physics is begun in the Soph- 
omore year. The ground of mechanics, heat, light and 
sound is very thoroughly covered in a course of five lec- 
tures per week throughout the year. In the Junior year the 
subject of electricity and magnetism is introduced by five 
lectures per week for one term and the engineering student 
begins elementary laboratory work in physical measure- 
ments. Students in mechanical engineering and electrical 
engineering continue work in physics to the end of the 
Senior Year. 

Peacticae and Professional Work. — Considerable 
time in the Junior and Senior Years is given by all engin- 
eering students to work having practical bearing on their 
profession; the object being to correlate, in some measure, 
theory and practice. 

This work differs for the several engineering courses 
and is described at length in the descriptive matter of each 
department. 

A certain amount of undergraduate work and a large 
amount of graduate work as well as the research carried 
on by the individual members of the engineering faculty is 
devoted to investigations which are helpful to the various 
industrial interests of the state. 



142 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Advanced students are given opportunity to assist 
all research or commercial work which is being conduct< 
by the engineering departments. 

The several engineering departments are at all tim- 
engaged in commercial investigations and are called fi. 
quently in consultation on engineering and industrial ento 
prises throughout the state. Many of the results of cor} 
mercial tests, special investigations and research woi 
are published in The Iowa Engineer, a quarterly public 
tion, issued in the interests of the engineering departmen 
of the College. 

♦BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT. 

The buildings occupied exclusively by the Division ! 
Engineering are Engineering Hall, the Power Station, t'j 
Forge Shop and Foundry and the Pattern Shop. In ado 
tion, the Chemical-Physical Laboratory contains the hea* 
quarters and much of the equipment of the Department ! 
Electrical Engineering. 

*Morrill Hall contains the headquarters and geologic 
collection and Museum of the Department of Geology ai 
Mining. 

**Engineering Hall. The third floor of this buildii 
contains the office of the Professor of Civil Engineering, 
computing and instrument room, a draughting room and 
large recitation room. 

The second floor contains the office of the Professor 
Mechanical Engineering, a computing and instrument roo 
a blue-print room, recitation room, and two draughti:- 
rooms. 

The first floor contains the oflice of the Associate Pi 
lessor of Mechanical Engineering, a machine shop and t 

I Lg laboratory. 



rooms. 



'in the fall of 1902, the offices, draughting and recitati 
■■>>■■, museum and minor laboratories of (he Division of E 
ffineering, as w< n as the complete laboratories of the Depal 
tnenl ol Physics, will have quarters In the ne-w Engineering E£i 
now being erected. 

••After L902, the second and third floors of the building w 
be devoted to free hand and Industrial drawing. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 143 



In the basement are located the hydraulic and the 
cement testing laboratories. 

Power Station. This is a one story brick building 
N36xl20, devoted to the lighting and pumping plants of the 
& College, and to the heating plant for the engineering build- 
eate ings. All of the equipment is used for purposes of instruc- 
tion, as far as this does not interfere with its other uses. 
The building contains an engine and dynamo room, a boiler 
room, and a pump room. 

Forge Shop and Foundry. This is a one story brick 
building 38x78 feet, containing the equipment for instruc- 
tion in forge-shop and foundry practice. The roof trusses 
are of steel and calculated to carry traveling cranes for 
transfering heavy castings and forgings. 

Pattern Shop. This is a one story brick building, 
idij 38x1 20 feet, devoted to the work of instruction in bench 
work, wood turning and pattern work. A fire proof room is 
provided for the storage of patterns. 

Locomotive Laboratory. For the temporary protection 
of the locomotive donated to the Department of Mechanical 
Engineering by the Chicago & Northwestern Railway, a 
corrugated iron structure has been provided. 

The Neiv Engineering Hall. There is now being erected 
a four story fire-proof stone building about 210 feet long 
by 90 feet deep for the accommodation of the offices, reci- 
tation, lecture and draughting rooms of the several engin- 
eering departments of the College. 

The basement will contain the heating and ventilating 
apparatus and a constant temperature room. 

The first story will contain the dynamo and general 
laboratories of department of physics; the cement and 
masonry laboratories of the Department of Civil Engineer- 
ing. The second story will contain the main offices and 
recitation rooms of the departments of mechanical and elec- 
trical engineering and the auditorium seating 400 persons. 
The third story will contain the main offices, recitation and 
draughting rooms of the civil and mining engineering de- 
partments and the general engineering museum. 



144 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

The fourth story will contain the large draughting 
rooms of the mechanical and civil engineering departments . 
and blue-print and photographic laboratories. The build- 
ing will be lighted, heated and ventilated by the most mod- 
ern methods and will be substantially and tastefully fur- 
nished throughout. 

The building will be ready for occupancy by the fall 
of 1902. 



DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

GEORGE WELTON BISSELL, PROFESSOR. 

W. H.MEEKER, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR; MR. LENNOX, MR. POT- 
TER, MR. BOUTELLE AND MR. WILSON, ASSISTANTS. 

*The headquarters of this department are in Engineer- 
ing Hall, of which the first and second floors are given up to 
its use. The first floor is occupied by the office of the As- 
sociate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and by the 
machine shops. The latter are in two rooms, having a 
floor space of about 3,000 square feet, one of the larger 
rooms having a portion screened off for a tool room. 

The second floor is occupied by the office of the Pro- 
fessor of Mechanical Engineering, computing room, blue- 
print and dark room, recitation room and a large drawing 
room. The recitation room will seat thirty students and 
the drawing room has tables for fifty. Two hundred draw- 
ing boards and a large number of drawings, photographs 
of blue-prints constitute the equipment of the drawing 
room. The recitation and drawing rooms have ample 
blackboard space. 

The basement is given up to engineering laboratory 
purposes, especially to experiment in hydraulics. 

Besides the above space in Engineering Hall, the de- 
partment occupies the Power House, the Pattern Shop, 
the Forge Shop and Foundry, and the Locomotive Labora- 
tory. 



Beginning In the fall Of I!)02, the headMiiarterflof t lie depart- 
ment will ho in the now Engineering Hall, now being erected. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 145 

The machine shops are equipped with twenty-four by 
twenty-four inch planer, a milling machine, a universal 
grinding machine, a shaper, a drill press, two emery grind- 
ers, a polishing wheel, a power hack saw, a cutting off ma- 
chine, eight engine lathes of capacities from ten to twenty 
inch swing and three to ten feet between centers, and 
three speed and drilling lathes together with the usual as- 
sortment of small tools in the tool room. Power is furnished 
to this shop by an electric motor. 

The pattern shop is a new brick building, one story 
high with spacious attic for storage of lumber. The build- 
ing is one hundred and twenty-eight feet long by thirty- 
eight feet wide. A tool room twelve by twenty feet is 
screened off in the center. A fire-proof room is provided 
for patterns. The equipment of the pattern shop consists 
of a universal buzz-saw, a mortising machine, planer, buzz 
planer, band-saw, jig-saw, grindstone, fifteen turning lathes, 
benches for twenty students, twenty-four complete sets of 
small tools and a number of special tools. Power for this 
building is furnished by a twenty horse-power electric 
motor. 

The forge and foundry equipments are housed under 
one roof in a brick building seventy-eight by thirty-eight 
feet. A steel truss roof structure of substantial construc- 
tion provides support for an overhead traveling crane, 
which serves the whole floor for handling heavy ladles, 
castings and forgings. Twelve forges, with blower and ex- 
haust fan. drill press, vises, anvils, grindstone and small 
tools, such as sledges, fullers and swages, constitute the 
equipment for forge work. 

The power house contains the complete electric light 
and pumping plants of the College, all of which is available 
for experimental work, and constitutes a part of the engin- 
eering laboratory equipment of the engineering depart- 
ments of the College. In addition to the above the engin- 
eering laboratory equipment of the department consists of 
a twelve horse-power Otto gasoline engine, a five horse- 
power Lennox gasoline engine, a Wheeler condenser, three 



146 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Worthington ana two other water meters, a Holly duplex 
pump, injectors, weir and weighing tanks, gas meters, a 
Crosby steam guage tester, fan blowers for experimental 
work, Westinghouse and New York air pumps, a 100,000 
pound *Riehle testing machine with Gray autographic de- 
vice, a 50,000 pound Olsen testing machine, an Olsen torsion 
testing machine, a Thurston oil tester, a complete De La 
Vergne refrigerating machine, gas analysis apparatus, two 
Thompson, two Crosby and one Richards indicators, dyna- 
mometers, a Prony brake, platform scales and other appara- 
tus essential and accessory to experimental engineering. 

Locomotive. The Chicago & Northwestern railway has 
presented to the Department an eight-wheel passenger lo- 
comotive and tender complete with all attachments. The 
locomotive will be mounted for experimental work and will 
be a valuable addition to the laboratory equipment. 

The principle dimensions of the locomotive are as fol- 
lows: 

Cylinders, 16x24 inches. 
Drivers, diameter, 63 inches. 
Driving wheel base, 7 feet, 3 inches. 
Total engine wheel base, 21 feet, 3 inches. 
Total engine and tender wheel base, 42 feet, 3 inchs. 
Total weight of engine, 70,000 pounds. 
Weight on drivers, 40,000 pounds. 

Students in mechanical engineering pursue the full 
course in shop-work, which consists of eight hours per 
week for four years. Partial courses are given to the stu- 
dents in the agricultural, mining and electrical engineer- 
ing courses. 

The system of instruction in the several shops begins 
with graded exercises calculated to familiarize the student 
with tools and with the materials used. The exercises are 
supplanted as soon as possible by work on machines or 
parts thereof which are to be put into actual use. By this 



*This machine la owned and used Jointly by the Departments 
of Mechanical and <'ivil lOrttfincering. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. " 147 

arrangement greater interest is maintained in the work 
than would oe possible with a strict adherence to the exer- 
cise system. The object of the shop work is not to teach 
trades, but to acquaint the student with the tools, materials 
and difficulties of shop practice and to establish in his 
mind principles which will aid him in designing and con- 
struction work in the other studies of his course and in 
his professional career. 

The drawing room work begins with a free-hand draw- 
ing and object drawing, and is followed successively by ma- 
chine sketching, mechanical, and kinematic drawing and 
designing. The latter division occupies the last two years 
of the course. 

The object sought by the drawing room course is to 
enable the student to make, as quickly as possible, neat 
and accurate working drawings, to design, in general and 
in detail, machines, or parts thereof, and to apply through- 
out his knowledge of shop methods and his theoretical in- 
formation acquired in the laboratory and class room. 

Experimental work begins with the Junior Year and 
extends to the end of the course. The instruction in this 
subject is thorough, its scope being indicated by the follow- 
ing list of experiments: Tensile, transverse and com- 
pression tests of materials, properties and lubricants, meas- 
urements of power by absorption and transmission dyna- 
moters, steam gauge and indicator spring calibration, flue- 
gas analysis, indicator practice, variation of engine speed, 
fan-blower tests, calorimetry, including throttling and sep- 
arating calorimeters, weir and water meter calibration, effi- 
ciency tests of steam engines, boilers, injectors, and steam 
heating, electric lighting, refrigerating, power and pumping 
plants, and thermal analysis of the steam engine, besides 
a number of special experiments in the line of investigation. 
The engineering laboratory work usually culminates in the 
thesis, which is an exhaustive investigation of a limited 
subject. From four to five hundred hours of actual time 
are spent on thesis by students in the engineering courses. 

Some recent theses have had the following headings: 



148 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

The Effect of Clearance on the Economy of a Steam En- 
gine. 

Comparative Tests of Lubricating Oils. 

Investigation to Determine the Proper Division of Ex- 
penses of the College Power Plant. 

Comparative Values of Iowa Coals. 

All students taking shop-work or engineering laboratory 
are required to pay a shop fee of Five Dollars ($5.00) to 
defray cost of materials, power, and breakage. 

In the class room the work is carried on by means of 
recitations and lectures, a text book and recitations being 
used wherever practicable; it is necessary, however, to 
present much material not found in text books, and in such 
cases recourse is had to the lecture system. 

The following courses of study are given by the Depart- 
ment of Mechanical Engineering: 

Couese I. — Analytical Mechanics. — Dynamics and 
graphical statics. Four recitations per week, first term, 
Junior Year. Professor Meeker. Text-book, Mechanics of 
Engineering, Church. Physics III and IV and Mathematics 
VIII are prerequisites. 

Couitsu II. — Analytical Mechanics. — Strength of mater- 
ials. Four recitations per week, second term, Junior Year. 
Professor Meeker. Text-book, same as for Course I. 
Course I required as prerequisite. 

Course III. — Materials of Construction. — Three recita- 
tions per week, second term, Junior Year. Professor 
Meeker. Text-book, Materials of Construction, Johnson. 
Course XI 1 and Chemistry III and VI required as pre- 

1 ••qui Sites. 

Coubbe IV. — titeam Engine. — Theory and practical ap- 
plicatiOD of Bteam and other neat engines. Three lectures 
or recitations per week, second term, Junior Year. Pro- 
lessor BiBSell. Text-book, The Steam Engine and Other 
Heat Bngines, Ewing. Course XII, Physics ill and IV and 
Mathematics J x are pre requisite s, 



DIVISION OP ENGINEERING. 149 

Course V. — Machine Design. — Elements, including kine- 
matics. Three lectures per week, first term, Junior Year. 
Professor Bissell. Text-book, Elements of Machine De- 
sign, A. W. Smith. Simultaneous work in Courses I, XII 
and XXIV required. 

Course VI. — Hydraulics. — Four recitations per week, 
first term, Senior Year. Professor Meeker. Text-book, 
same as for Course I. Courses I and II required. 

Course VII. — Steam Engine Design. — Three lectures 
per week, first term, Senior Year. Professor Bissell. 
Courses III and I V" required. 

Course VIII. — Specifications and Contracts. — Three lec- 
tures or recitations per week for five weeks, first term. 
Professor Bissell. Open to Senior engineering students in 
good standing. 

Course IX. — Constructive Engineering. — Design and 
construction of heating, power, lighting and pumping plants 
in general and in detail. Three lectures per week, second 
term, Senior Year. Professor Bissell. Text-book, Kent T s 
Hand Book. Courses IV, V, VI, VII and VIII required. 

Course X. — Thesis. — The equivalent of one hour per 
week in the first term, Senior Year, and 

Course XI. — Thesis. — The equivalent of five hours per 
week in the second term, Senior Year, devoted to special 
research on an assigned topic. Professor Bissell. Can 
be undertaken only by those students in the Department of 
Mechanical Engineering who have completed the prescribed 
course in Mechanical Engineering to the end of the Junior 
Year. 

Course XII. — Engineering Laboratory . — One half day, 
(four hours) per week in the first term, Junior Year, and 

Course XIII. — Engineering Laboratory. — One half day 
(four hours) per week in the second term, Junior Year. 
Properties of materials, calibration of instruments, valve 
setting and indicator practice, efficiency tests of simple 
machines. Professor Meeker. Text-book, Experimental 
Engineering, R. C. Carpenter. Physics III and IV and 
Chemistry III and VI required as prerequisites. 



150 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Course XIV. — Engineering Laboratory. — Two half days 
per week in the first term, Senior Year, and 

Course XV. — Engineering Laboratory. — Two half days 
per week in the second term, Senior ^ear. Efficiency tests 
of stationary, locomotive and traction engines, gasoline en- 
gines, hot-air engines, boilers, refrigerating machinery, 
machines and complete plants. Professor Bissell. courses 
IV, XII and XIII required as prerequisites. 

Course XVI. — Seminar. — One hour per week in the 
first term and 

Course XVII. — Seminar. — One hour per week in the 
second term, Senior Year. Written papers on assigned 
topics of engineering interest with discussions thereof. Pro- 
fessor Bissell. Juniors in Mechanical Engineering are ad- 
vised to attend the Seminar. 

Course XIX. — Free Hana Drawing. — Six hours per 
week in the first term. Mr. Wilson. Required of all Acad- 
emic students who have not had the equivalent. 

Course XX. — Free Hand Drawing. — Machine Sketch- 
ing. Six hours per week in the second term; Mr. Wilson. 
Required of all engineering students in the Academic Year. 
Course XIX or its equivalent required as prerequisite. 

Course XXI. — Mechanical Drawing. — Elementary; the 
use of instruments and practice in lettering. Six hours per 
week in the first term, Freshman Year. Mr. Wilson. 
Courses XIX and XX, or their equivalent required as pre- 
requisites. 

Course XXII. — Mechanical Drawing. — Working draw- 
ings, tracings and blue-prints of machine details, oix hours 
per week in the first term, Sophomore Year. Professor 
Meeker and Mr. Wilson. Course XXI required as pre- 
requisite. 

Course XXIII. — Mechanical Drawing. — Working draw- 
ings, tracing and blue-prints of complete machines. Six 
liours per week in the second term, Sophomore Year. Pro- 
i< or Meeker. Course XXII required as prerequisite. 

Course XX] v . — Designing. — Six hours per week in the 
first term and 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 151 

Course XXV. — Designing. — Three hours per week in 
the second term, Junior Year. Mechanical movements, 
gearing, slide valve work and design of simple machines. 
Professor Bissell and Mr. Wilson. Text-books, Kinematic 
Drawing, Williams, and Slide Valve Gears, Halsey. 

Course XXVI. — Designing. — Six hours per week in the 
first term and 

Course XXVII. — Designing. — Six hours per week in the 
second term, Senior Year. Designing of steam engines, 
boilers and machine tools. Proessor Bissell. Text books, 
Kent's Hand Book. Courses I, II, IV, V, XXIV, XXV re- 
quired as prerequisites. 

Course XXIX. — Shop-Work. — Bench-work, wood carv- 
ing and turning. Eight hours per week for one term. Mr. 
Potter. 

Course XXX. — Shop-Work. — Forge-work; forging and 
welding iron and steel, dressing and tempering tools. Eight 
hours per week for one term. Mr. Boutelle. Course XXIX 
required. 

Course XXXI. — Shop-Work. — Pattern work, making 
patterns and core-boxes of iron and brass castings. Prin- 
ciples of shrinkage, draft an dallowance for finish. Eight 
hours per week for one term. Mr. Potter. Courses XXIX 
and XXXII required. 

Course XXXII. — Shop-Work.— Foundry work. Mould- 
ing and casting of iron and brass. Green and dry sand, 
cores, venting, gating, mixtures and alloys. Eight hours 
per week for one term. Mr. Boutelle. Course XXIX re- 
quired as prerequisite. 

Course XXXI 1 1.— Shop-Work. — Eight hours per week 
for one term, 

Course XXXIV.— Shop-Work. — Eight hours per weeK 
for one term, 

Course XXaV— Shop-Work. — Eight hours per week 
for one term. Use of hand and machine tools, finishing, 
grinding and assembling of machines and parts thereof. 
Mr. Lennox. Courses XXIX, XXX, XXXI and XXXII re- 
quired as prerequisite. 



152 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Course XXXVII. — Shop-Work. — Wood work; four o* 
eight hours per week for one term. Mr. Potter. Open to 
students in the Division of Agriculture. 

Course XXXVIII. — Shop-Work. — Forge work; four or 
eight hours per week for one term. Mr. Boutelle. Open 
to students in the Division of Agriculture. 

Course XXXIX. — Modern Machine Shop Practice. — One 
lecture per week to students who are taking Courses 
XXXIII and XXXIV. 

Course XL. — Dairy Machinery. — One lecture per week 
first term. Mr. Lennox. Open to students in the Division 
of Agriculture. 

Course XLII. — Wood Carving. — Three hours per week 
second term, elective for Seniors in General and Domestic 
Science 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 



ACADEMIC YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



Algebra, 5. 
English, 5. 
History, 5. 
Elocution, 2. 
Drawing, 2. 



(Mathematics, I.) 

(English, I.) 

(History, 1.) 

(Elocution, 1.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIX.) 



SECOND TERM. 



Algebra, 5. 

Plane Geometry, 5. 

Elementary Rhetoric, 5. 

History, 4. 

Drawing, 2. 



(Mathematics, II or 111.) 

(Mathematics, V.) 

(English, II.) 

(History, II. A) 

Mechanical Engineering, XX.) 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 



153 



Advanced Algebra, 5. 
French, 5, or 
German, 5. 

Advanced Rhetoric, 5. 
Shop-Work, 2. 
Mechanical Drawing, 2. 
Military Drill, 2. 
Library Work, 4 hours. 



FIRST TERM. 

(Mathematics, IV.) 

(Languages, I.) 

(Languages, V.) 

(English, III.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXIX.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXI.) 

(Military, 1.) 

(Library, 1.) 

SECOND TERM. 



Solid Geometry and Plane Trigonometry, 5. 

(Mathematics, VI.) 
French, 5, or (Languages, V.) 

German, 5. (Languages, VI.) 

Composition, 1. (English, IV.) 

Descriptive Geometry, 5. (Civil Engineering, IV.) 

Shop-work, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XXX.) 

Military Drill, 2. (Military, II.) 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Analytical Geometry, 5. 
Physics, 5. 
Chemistry, 5. 
Shop-work, 2. 
Mechanical Drawing, 2. 
Composition, 1. 
Military Drill, 2. 



Calculus, 5. 
Physics, 5. 
Chemistry, 5. 



FIRST TERM. 

I 

(Mathematics, VII I. ) 

(Physics, III.) 

(Chemistry, III.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXXI.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXII.) 

(English, V.) 

(Military, III.) 



SECOND TERM. 



(Mathmetics, IX.) 

(Physics, IV.) 

(Chemistry, VI.) 



154 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Shop-work, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XXXII.) 

Mechanical Drawing, 2. (Mchanical Engineering, XXIU.) 
Composition, 1. (English, VI.) 

Military Drill, 2. (Military, IV.) 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Analytical Mechanics, 4. (Mechanical Engineering, I.) 

Political Economy, 5. (Economic Science, 1.) 

Electricity and Magnetism, 3. (Physics, VI.) 

Machine Design, 3. (Mechanical Engineering, V.) 

Physical Laboratory, 1. (Physics, XIV.) 

Engineering Laboratory, 1. (Mechanical Engineering, XII.) 
Designing, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XXIV.) 

Shop-work, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XXXIII.) 

*Debating, 1. (English, VII.) 

**Historic Development, XlXth Century, 2. (History, VII.) 

SECOND TERM. 

Analytical Mechanics, 4. (Mechanical Engineering, II.) 
Materials of Construction, 3. (Mechanical Engineering, III.) 
Dynamo Electric Machinery, 4. (Physics, X.) 

Physical Laboratory, 2. (Physics, XVII.) 

Engineering Laboratory, 1. (Mechanical Engineering, XIII.) 
Designing, 1. (Mechanical Engineering, XXV.) 

Steam Engine, 3. (Mechanical Engineering, IV.) 

Shop-work, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XXXIV.) 

♦Debating, 1. (English, VIII.) 

"""Historic Development, XlXth Century, 2. (History, VII.) 
SENIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Steam Engine Design, 3. (Mechanical Engineering, VII.) 
Hydraulics, 4. (Mechanical Engineering, VI.) 

Designing, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XXVI.) 

Engineering Laboratory, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XIV.) 



•Elective, eubjecl to (he approval of the Professor of Mo- 
< h i ir. -I I Engineering. 

••Elective in either term of Junior or Senior Year, subject u 
approval of Professoi oi Mechanical Engineering. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 155 

Shop-work, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XXXV.) 

Physical Laboratory, 2. (Physics, XX.) 

Specifications and Contracts, 1. 

(Mechanical Engineering, VIII.) 
Seminar, 1. (Mechanical Engineering, XVI.) 

Thesis, 1. (Mechanical Engineering, X.) 

♦"■Historic Development, XlXth Century, 2. (History, VII.) 

SECOND TERM. 

Constructive Engineering, 3. (Mechanical Engineering, IX.) 
Hydraulic Engineering, 2. (Civil Engineering, XXII.) 

Designing, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XXVII.) 

Engineering Laboratory, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XV.) 
Seminar, 1. (Mechanical Engineering, XVII.) 

Thesis, 5. (Mechanical Engineering, XI.) 

♦♦Historic Development, XlXth Century, 2. (History, VII.) 
DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

ANSON MARSTON, PROFESSOR. 
C. W. J. NEVILLE, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR; 

MISS WILSON, ASSISTANT. 

On the completion of the new Engineering Hall the 
Civil Engineering Department will have its headquarters 
in that building. At present it occupies the third story 
of the present Engineering Hall, besides considerable lab- 
oratory space in the rooms of the Mechanical Engineering 
Department in the first story. Its hydraulic and cement 
testing laboratories are located in the basement of the 
present Engineering Hall. The rooms in the third story 
include a class-room with seats for 60 students, a well 
lighted drafting-room, with drawing stands for forty stu- 
dents and boards for 120; an instrument and computing 
room, and the office of the Department. 

The Instrumental Equipment includes five complete en- 
gineer's transits, one plain engineer's transit, one astronomi- 
cal transit, one plane table, one surveyor's compass, one rail- 
road compass, six traverse tables, four engineer's levels, 
and numerous chains, tapes, rods, etc. The Department is 

♦♦Elective in either term of Junior or Senior Year, subject to 
approval of Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 



156 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

also well supplied with minor instruments such as drawing 
instruments, field glasses, computing machines, planimeter, 
etc. 

The Laboratory Equipment includes stone sawing and 
grinding machinery, a drying oven, an abrasion testing 
machine, a standard rattler for paving brick tests, a micro- 
scope, various balances, etc. In conjunction with the Me- 
chanical Engineering Department the Civil Engineering 
Department owns an automatic and autographic Riehle 
testing machine of 100,000 pounds capacity for crushing, 
tensile and transverse tests of steel, iron, wood, stone and 
paving brick. Students also have access to other testing 
machines. The Department possesses a complete cement 
testing outfit, consisting of a Fairbank's testing machine, 
a mixing slab, many briquette moulds, cement and sand 
sieves, bath, etc. 

A Hydraulic Laboratory has been fitted up in the base- 
ment of the present Engineering Hall. Water is supplied 
by about 700 feet of 8 inch and 10 inch cast iron pipe from 
the College elevated tank, of 163,000 gallons capacity. 
The available head is about 150 feet. Arrangements are 
made for measuring the loss of head from friction in the 
supply pipe and in its special castings. In the laboratory a 
tank is provided 50 feet long by 6 feet wide and 4 feet 
deep, which is used as a measuring and discharging tank 
for tbe various pieces of apparatus, and which can also 
be used for experiments on the resistance of models to 
propulsion. The water is removed from this tank by two 
sewers; one 6 inches and the other 15 inches in diameter. 
These are arranged to be used for experiments on the 
laws of flow in sewer pipes. The laboratory is also pro- 
vided with pipes of different sizes so arranged that meas- 
urements of the friction losses in these pipes and in their 
fittings can be made. Additional apparatus in the nature 
of hydraulic motors, pumps of various types, and apparatus 
for experiments with orifices is still to be provided. 

Other Equipment. The Department has a good collec- 
tion of blue print plans of bridges, roof trusses, buildings, 



DIVISION OF ENGINEEKING. 157 

and other engineering structures and apparatus of all 
kinds. Additional plans and cuts are constantly being 
obtained as opportunity offers; lantern slides of many of 
these cuts and plans have been prepared for use in the 
class-room. 

The Department possesses a set of full sized sections 
of the wrought iron and steel shapes commonly used in 
engineering structures. 

The Department has a collection of specimens of brick, 
building stone, and other building materials and of paving 
brick. 

WATER WORKS AND SEWAGE DISPOSAL PLANT. 

This Department designed and supervised the construc- 
tion of the College water works. The College water tower 
is the largest in the west. It was designed with special 
reference to its architectural appearance, and cuts of it 
have been published in the recent 'books treating of the 
design of such structures. The pumping machinery, which 
is of an unusual and efficient type, is so arranged that 
College students in water works engineering can make 
tests of the efficiency of the apparatus as part of the class 
work. 

The Department has also designed and supervised the 
construction of the College Sewage Disposal System. This 
is the first purification plant installed in the state, and has 
been very successful. Investigations in the line of the 
most recent advances in sewage purification are now being 
conducted with the College plant, and the College is also 
studying the operation of similar plants elsewhere. It is 
hoped that the results of these investigations will be of 
much value to Iowa cities in the future. In this work the 
Departments of Agricultural Chemistry and of Botany co- 
operate. 

The water works system and the sewage disposal sys- 
tems are utilized so far as possible to furnish practical 
object lessons to the students of Hydraulic and Sanitary 
Engineering. 



158 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS HELPFUL TO 
STATE INTERESTS. 

The modern university or school of technology must 
serve the public in many other ways than by giving class 
instruction to students. Experimental and other investiga- 
tions on important subjects must be carried on, and the 
results of these as well as other important or recent truths 
of advanced thought, or theoretical or applied science, 
must be made known to the general public as well as to 
the institution's own students. 

Realizing this, the Department of Civil Engineering 
is doing what it can to advance the interests of the State 
of Iowa by carrying on investigations helpful to state inter- 
ests. One of the most important lines of work already 
begun is the testing of the properties of the building ma- 
terials and paving brick of the state. Several thousand 
tests of paving brick and of dry press brick manufactured 
and used in Iowa have been made. The results of this 
work are quite important and it is hoped that when they 
are published they will assist to make the properties of 
Iowa building materials and paving brick better known, and 
so increase their use. The results will shortly be published 
and widely distributed by the College, and are afterwards 
to be republished by the State Geological Survey. 

In connection with this work the Department of Min- 
ing Engineering is co-operating by making equally exten- 
sive tests and investigations of the clays from which the ij 
brick tested by the Civil Engineering Department were 
made. It is to be hoped that the new building for work 
in Ceramics can soon be erected. In this building the De- 
partments will have a joint laboratory well equipped for 
such investigations. Until this building is erected this 
work will be provided for in the New Engineering Hall now 
in process of construction. 

The Department hereby extends an invitation to the 
clay workers and to the quarry owners of the State of 
Iowa to send their products to it for the carrying out of 






DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 159 

any tests they may wish to be made. Such tests will be 
made at the actual cost of the extra labor required to carry 
them out. No charge will be made for the use of the 
apparatus nor for the supervision of the work by the reg- 
ular officers of the Department. A similar invitation is 
extended to municipal authorities, engineers, manufacturers 
and others who may wish to have tests of materials made. 

A set of tests of the gypsum product of the state is 
under way for the State Geological Survey, and another 
for the manufacturers themselves will probably be under- 
taken later. 

It is the purpose of the department to assist in every 
possible way in the development of the Engineering indus- 
tries of the State of Iowa, and communications are invited 
from manufacturers, municipal authorities, officers in 
charge of transportation interests, or engineers throughout 
the state who may desire to make use of the facilities at 
the command of the Department. 

The experiments now in progress with the College 
Sewage Disposal System already mentioned, constitute a 
line of work which will be very helpful to state interests, 
for many of our cities will in the near future find them- 
selves compelled to cease polluting the streams of the 
state with their unpurified sewage. There is a wide move- 
ment in Iowa at the present time to construct sewer sys- 
tems for our cities, and in a large percentage of cases no 
suitable outlet into a sufficiently large body of water is 
available. Hence sewage disposal systems are destined to 
special importance in this state. Already the College has 
published a bulletin giving the results with the College 
plant, and has distributed it throughout the state. Other 
bulletins will follow. Already the college is receiving 
numerous inquiries regarding this subject, not only from 
towns within the state, but from others scattered through- 
out the whole country. 

Some of the experimental thesis work by students of 
this Department has been of value in furnishing informa- 
tion useful to state interests and to engineers. A few 



160 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

years ago two students made gaugings of the flow of sewage 
from the sewers of Des Moines, giving information which 
has since been published in more than one book on Sanitary 
Engineering. In one of the thesis investigations made in 
1898 nearly 200 photographs were taken, from which the 
exact paths of fire streams from hose nozzles under dif- 
ferent conditions have been mapped out, giving information 
of value to hydraulic engineers, In another recent thesis 
investigation a magnetic survey of Story County has beer 
made, showing before unnoticed variations in the isogonk 
lines. This work has been extended to Boone County. 

The Department hopes to be able to make investiga 
tions along the line of Iowa good roads in the near future. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 

One of the most eminent of American engineers has 
said. "The civil engineer of the new epoch must be ar 
educated man. In no profession will this be more necesi 
sary." The work of the course of study in Civil Engineer 
ing has been arranged to give as thorough a training as 
practicable in those fundamental subjects, a knowledge o: 
which must form the foundation of the equipment of th«] 
competent civil engineer. The work may be classifier 
under the heads, Culture Studies, Mathematical Studies 
Science Studies, and Professional Studies. 

Culture studies include History, English, French or Ger ; 
man and Political Economy. Thorough work in Englisl 
is especially necessary in the training of the engineer t<| 
enable him to express himself with the utmost clearnesij 
and conciseness, in his reports and in papers on technical 
subjects. No one can attain much success as an enginee 
who fails in these particulars. His success in carrying ou ; 
projects upon which he is engaged will often depend oi 
his ability to convince his superiors or public officials oj 
the correctness of his vkws. The really successful engi 
Qeer also must, come in close contact with other member I 
of his profession, and must exchange information of valuj 
with them through the medium of papers on technica 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 161 

subjects. For the attainment of these ends the engineer 
should give special attention to the thoroughness of his 
training in English. The work in English begins in the 
Academic year and continues to the end of the Sophomore 
year. Much training in the writing of essays is given and 
the last three terms are devoted wholly to this kind of work, 
which is of special importance to the engineer. A course 
in debating is offered throughout the Junior year which all 
tudents who can do so are advised to elect. It is of im- 
portance to the engineer to be able to express himself cred- 
tably orally as well as in writing. The drill in English is 
ontinued to some extent throughout the Junior and Senior 
-ears by the work in the Engineering Seminar, which re- 
liiires a careful preparation of papers on professional sub- 
ects. 

The work in pure mathematics continues throughout 
he Academic, Freshman and Sophomore years, and in- 
ludes thorough instruction in Algebra, Plane and Solid 
Geometry, Plane and Spherical Trigonometry, Analytical 
xeometry and Calculus. Thorough preparation in mathe- 
oatics is one of the most essential things in an engineer's 
ducation, and without it he can never pass beyond the 
aed |nere workman stage in his profession. It is specially nee- 
ssary that he should be able to apply his knowledge of 
aathematics with facility to the actual problems he en- 
ounters in his professional work. Hence the instruction 
mathematics is specially directed to giving facility in 
ilto he solution of problems. The work in pure mathematics 
e5i )s supplemented in the Freshman year by a course in Des- 
riptive Geometry, which gives the application of mathe- 
matics to draughting, and in the Junior and Senior years 
thorough courses in Analytical Mechanics, Strength of 
d Materials and Hydraulics, which give the mathematical ap- 
8 ol lications of physical laws to the designing of engineering 
enfltructures and to the study of the laws of liquids. Prac- 
cal Astronomy is studied in the second term of the Senior 
linear. 

The successful engineer must also be thoroughly fa- 

6 



rioal 



162 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

miliar with the scientific principles relating to the law 
and forces of nature which he must use in his professiona 
work. Instruction in the physical sciences begins wit' 
Chemistry and Physics in the Sophomore year. Electricit 
and Magnetism are taught in the Junior year, and Geolog 
in the Senior year. The College laboratories are speciall 
well fitted for giving training in scientific work. It is by 
study of scientific subjects supplemented by laboratory wor 
that the engineer becomes familiar with those sources < 
power in nature which it is his life work to direct for it 
use and convenience of man. 

For detailed information as to the nature of tl 
professional work given in the course in Civil Engineeria 
the reader is referred to the statements regarding ea< 
specific subject under the head of "Courses" below. It m? 
be said here in a general way that the instruction in Fr 
Hand Drawing begins in the Academic year. Mechanic^ 
Drawing, lettering, the use of Water Colors and P< 
Topography are studied in the Freshman year. Shades a: 
shadows and perspective .are studied in the Sophomc 
year. In the course of instruction in Drawing it is 
tempted to give the student such facility in drawing tt 
he can do creditable work in an engineering drafting offi 
Especial attention is paid to the lettering of all drawii:- 
both in the direct class work in drawing and in the fini 
ing up of all other drawings made in connection with his o 
( i professional work. The student is required to letter thj 
plainly and neatly and to make finished plates. Throu 
out the Sophomore, .Junior and Senior years the stud 
has practice in the preparation of maps and of drawii 
and plans of various engineering structures. 

The work in Field Surveying practice begins in *l 
Freshman year and continues for three years, seven ho'sj 
per week for fourteen weeks of each term. The stud 
serves in a subordinate position until he becomes fami 
with the Instruments and the work, and finally he i 
charge of a small party. He becomes familiar with Id 
surveying, Leveling, topographical surveying and raiMVl 
surveying by actual work in the field. It is the aim of ie 






DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 163 

ourse to give the student the facility in the handling of 
ostruments and in the carrying out of operations in held 
arveyicg which can only be acquired by considerable 
iractiee. It is also attempted to give him as much exper- 
ence as possible in the handling of small parties of men. 
tesides the above work students actually camp in the 
[eld for two weeks and a half in each of three summer 
ions, and so become familiar with topographical work 
n a more extended scale. In lieu of this summer sur- 
eying many students obtain remunerative work with 
ngineers throughout the summer vacation. Such work, 
hen properly certified to by the engineer under whom it 
3 taken, is accepted in lieu of the summer camp surveying, 
tudents are encouraged and urged to secure positions of 
his kind, as it not only assists them financially, but also 
3 of great benefit to them in connection with their pro- 
ssional training. 

A course of instruction in land and topographical sur- 
eying runs throughout the Sophomore year and one in 
ailway engineering runs throughout the Junior year. 

Instruction in roads and pavements is given in the 
tecond term of the Junior year. Sanitary Engineering 
Vater Works Engineering, Bridge Engineering and Ma- 
onry Structures and Foundations are taught in the Senior 
ear. For the details of each of these courses reference 
hould be made to the information given below under the 
pecific course named. The designing of engineering 
tructures by the student begins in the second term of the 
unior year and continues throughout the Senior year. In 
his work the student actually designs roof trusses and 
tone and steel truss bridges, preparing the working draw- 
gs. A course of actual practice in testing the various 
rials of construction in the Engineering Laboratory, 

riven in the Junior and Senior years, and is of great 
'!" p in familiarizing the student with methods of testing 
nd with the properties of the materials of construction. 

A valuable part of the work of the course is not laid 

on paper, but is gained by inspection of engineering 



es a: 
m ., 
is: 
... 

u£ 
auto 

liiso' 
II till 

studf 
rawii 

in l 



164 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



work on the inspection tours arranged for the upper class- 
men. It is planned at least once each year to have the 
Junior and Senior students go on an inspection trip to 
some point where various engineering works can be in- 
spected and their instructive features noted. 

Valuable instruction is also obtained by listening to 
the lectures given by non-resident lecturers. Practicing 
engineers are invited to the College to give lectures to I 
the engineering students upon the subjects in which they ; 
are experts. During the past year such lectures have been 
given by Mr. M. T. Riggs, M. Am. Soc. C. B., who is in 
charge of the Toledo branch of the American Bridge Co., 
perhaps the best equipped modern bridge plant in thej 
country. Another lecture was given to the engineering] 
students by Mr. W. J. Karner, Assistant to the Chief Engi- 
neer of the Illinois Central Railroad. It is planned to havej 
at least two such lectures for the Civil Engineering Depart 
ment each year, and the other enginering departments alsc 
arrange for non-resident lecturers 

The work of the course finally culminates in the thesis 
an original investigation carried on by the student t< 
demonstrate his ability to do such work before he gradn 
ates. In the past large amounts of time have been devotecl 
by students as a ryle to this work, and it has often beeil 
the case that the results have been found worthy of publ}} 
cation. Each student should attempt to make his thesis 
one of the things of which he can justly be proud througl 
out the remainder of his professional career. 

The following courses of study are given by the Civ 
ineering Department: 

Course I. — Lettering. — Throo hours per week throng) 
mil, the first term, Froshman year. Toxt-book, Reinhardt* 
"Lettering for Draughtsmen, Engineers and Students 
The work consists in the preparation of practice plates 
lettering and titles, and in actual practice in lettering 
gineering drawings. Miss Wilson. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 165 

Course Ii.— Field Work. — Seven hours per week for 
fourteen weeks during the first term, Freshman year. See 
Course III. Professor Marston, Professor Neville. 

Course III. — Field Work. — Seven hours per week for 
fourteen weeks during the second term, Freshman year. 
In Courses II and III the men are assigned to do duty as 
,:: rhainmen, axemen and rodmen in the squads in Sophomore 
rj Surveying and Junior Railway Surveying, of which Sopho- 
t J mores and Juniors have charge, besides serving as instru- 
pJment men. Professor Marston, Professor Neville. 

m Note. — The work in Courses II and III is preparatory 
Co flto the Feild Work of the Sophomore and Junior years, 
ttflwhich takes the same number of hours per week each 
""■year. Thus the student has the training to be obtained 
'fl?{ by three years' actual experience in the field. He begins in 
^ a subordinate position, but for a part of the time is in 
P^ responsible charge of a small party. 

,,'1; 

Course IV. — Descriptive Geometry. — Four recitations 

and three hours drawing per week throughout the second 

^jt term, Freshman year. Text-book, MacCord's "Descriptive 

j C Geometry." Many original problems are also solved in 

^ class and in the draughting room. This course is open to 

'uj students who have completed Mechanical Drawing, Plane 

^ Geometry, and second term Academic Algebra, and who 

H are taking a simultaneous course in solid Geometry and 

. ■ Trigonometry. Professor Marston and Miss Wilson. 

m i Course V. — Drawing. Tinting and Shading and Pen 

opography. — Six hours per week throughout the second 

rm, Freshman year. The work consists in practice with 

ater colors (occupying about one-half of the total time), 

d of making practice plates illustrating the use of topo- 

phical symbols, contours and hatchings, during the 

^•mainder of the time. This course is open to the students 

'O have completed Free Hand Drawing. Miss Wilson. 

late?- Course VI.— Drawing. Shades and Shadows and Per- 

ring! wective.— Three hours per week throughout the first term, 

Sophomore year. See course VII. Miss Wilson. 




166 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Course VII. — Drawing. Shades and Shadows and Per- 
spective. — Three hours per week throughout the second 
term, Sophomore year. For Courses VI and VII the text- 
books are Miss Wilson's Notes and Lawrence's "Principles 
of Perspective." The drawing consists partly in the solu- 
tion of problems in Shades and Shadows (shading with 
India ink), partly in the solution of problems and in sample 
exercises in Perspective and, partly in the preparation 
and architectural rendering of a perspective drawing of a 
building or engineering structure, from the detailed plans. 
This course is open to students who have completed Des- 
criptive Geometry, Mechanical Drawing and Tinting and 
Shading. Miss Wilson. 

Course VIII. — Surveying. — Two recitations and seven 
hours field work per week throughout the first term, Sopho 
more year, in the Civil Engineering Course, and through- 
out the first term Junior year in the Agricultural course. 
Text-book, Hodgman's "Land Surveying." The topics treated 
in the class-room work are the use and care of surveying in- 
struments, matnematical problems in surveying, including 
methods for calculating the areas of tracts of land, the legal 
and mathematical principles of Land Surveying, the besl 
methods of doing field work and keeping records in Land] 
Surveying, the study of Drainage^Surveying and the mak 
ins of plats and profiles. The field work, which occupies 
seven hours each week for fourteen weeks, begins witl 
practice in the use and adjustment of surveying instru 
ments, followed by practice in levelling and in the prepar 
atiOD of profiles. After this the students go to the Count: 
Seat, and copy from the County Surveyor's books tin 
records relating to some tract of land near the College 
They then survey this tract,, re-locating all missing corner 
and setting others where required, and obtaining all dats 
ry for constructing an accurate and complete plat 
The construction of this plat finishes the term's wort 

course Is open to students who have completed GecM 
metry and Plane Trigonometry. Professor Neville. 



I 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 167 

Course IX. — Surveying. — Two recitations and seven 
hours field work per week throughout the second term, 
Sophomore year. Text-book, Johnson's "Theory and Prac- 
tice of Surveying." The topics treated in the class-room 
wor .v are Topographical Surveying, Hydrographic burveying 
Mining Surveying, City Surveying and Geodetic Surveying. 
The field work, which occupies seven hours per week for 
fourteen weeks, consists mainly in obtaining the necessary 
data in the field and then in constructing an accurate map 
of a tract containing about 160 acres, showing the contours 
and other topographical features. This course is open to 
students who have completed Course VIII. Professor 
Neville. 

Course X. — Hallway Engineering. — Three recitations 
and seven hours field work per week throughout the first 
term, Junior year. See Course XI. For one of the recita- 
tions three hours office work are substituted part of the 
term. Professor Marston. 

Course XI. — Raihvay Engineering. — Three recitations 
I and seven hours field work per week, throughout the sec- 
ond term, Junior year. For one of the recitations three 
! hours office work are substituted during part of the term. 

For Courses X and XI the text-books are Searle's 
Field Engineering," Crandall's "Transition Curves," Trat- 
! man's "Railway Track and Track Work," and Professor 
Marston's Notes. In the Notes, practical details or rail- 
road location and construction are given, standard plans 
for railway structures are given and discussed, and the 
economic theory of railway location is treated at some 
length. In the text-books some of the topics are simple, 
compound and transition curves, the location and construc- 
tion of railways, track standards and maintenance, etc. In 

-ield work a preliminary survey of about four miles of 
raihvay is made, from which a contour map is prepared. 
On this a "paper location" is laid down, after a careful 
Btudy to determine the best route. This located line is 
then run in the field and cross sectioned. The grading 
's calculated, bills of material for culverts and bridges are 



168 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

made, bridges are staked out, and the cost of the line is 
estimated. This course is open to students who have com- 
pleted Geometry, Plane Trigonometry, and Courses VIII and 
IX. Professor Marston. 

Course XII. — Roads and Pavements. — Two recitations J 
throug-out the second term, Junior year, in the Courses! 
in Civil Engineering and Agriculture. Text-books, Spald- 
ing's Roads and Pavements, and Tillson's Pavements. Among 
the topics studied are the good roads problem, the best 
methods of constructing country roads, city streets and 
grades, classes and methods of construction of pavements 
and the costs of roads and pavements. Professor Mars 
ton. 



Course XIII. — Designing, Structural. — Six hours pei 
week throughout the second term, Junior year. Text-book 
Johnson's "Framed Structures." The work consists ii 
actually designing one or more roof trusses or a plate gird 
er bridge, including calculating the stresses, the sizes o I 
the members and the riviting, and in preparing workinjfl 
plans, bills of material and estimates of weights. Thig 
course is open to students who have completed the firs 
term Junior work in Analytical Mechanics, and are puiB 
suing simultaneously the second term Junior work in th/B 
same subject. Professor Neville. 



Course XIV. — Engineering Laboratory. — Six hours pe 
week throughout the second term, Junior year. The wor 
is done in the testing laboratories, and consists in makin | 
the various standard tests of the materials of constructioi 
including cement, building stone, paving brick, wood, ca> 
iron, wrought iron, and steel. This course is open to Jur 
iors. Miss Wilson. 

Course XV. — Engineering Laboratory. — Three houi 
per week throughout the first term, Senior year. The woi 
consists in experiments in the Hydraulic Laboratory, exuM 
as gauging the flow of water over weirs, through orific j 
and in sewer pipes, measuring the friction in pipes, a 



DIV1 SION ( ) F ENG I N E I •: RING. 1 69 

testing the efficiency of pumps and hydraulic motors. This 
Course is open to Seniors who are at the same time study- 
ing hydraulics. Miss Wilson. 

Course XVI. — Engineering Laboratory. — Three hours 
per week throughout the second term, Senior year. The 
work consists of special investigations in the hydraulic 
or testing laboratory on subjects selected after consulta- 
tion with the instructor. This Course is open to students 
who have completed Courses XIV and XV. Miss Wilson. 

Course XVII. — Framed Structures. — Five recitations 
nor week throughout the first term, Senior year. Text- 
book, Johnson's "Framed Structures." The work consists 
in the study of methods for computing the stresses and 
making the design of bridge and roof trusses and other 
framed structures. Many numerical problems are worked 
out. This course is open to students who have completed 
Mechanics. Professor Neville. 

Course XVIII. — Framed Structures. — Two recitations 
Iper week throughout the second term, Senior year. Text- 
book. Johnson's "Framed Structures." This course is open 
'o students who have completed Course XVII, of which it 
is a continuation. Professor Neville. 

Course XIX. — Designing. — Twelve hours per week 

hroughout the second term, Senior year. Text-book, 

Johnson's "Framed Structures." The work consists in 

actually designing a steel or iron railway or highway 

;e, including the calculation of the stresses, the com- 

jputation of the sizes of members, the riviting, etc., and the 

(narking of the detailed plans, estimating the weights, and 

preparing bills of materials. This course is open to stu- 

who have completed Course XVII. Professor Neville. 

Course XX. — Stereotomy. — Six hours per week 
hroughout the first term, Senior year. Text-book, Cran- 
lall's Stereotomy." The work consists in actually design- 
ling a stone, brick, concrete or Melan arch bridge. This 
ourse is open to students who have completed Mechanics. 
iProfessor Marston. 



170 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Course XXI. — Sanitary Engineering. — Three recita- 
tations per week throughout the first term, Senior year. 
Text-book, Folwell's "Sewerage," and Professor Marston's 
Notes. The work consists in the study of the principles 
and methods involved in the design, construction and 
maintenance of sewerage systems. House plumbing and 
sewage disposal are studied in the Notes. Professor 
Marston. 

Course XXII. — Hydraulic Engineering. — Three recita- 
tions per week throughout tne second term, Senior year, 
on the principles and methods involved in the design, con- 
struction and maintenance of water works systems. Text- 
book, Turneaure and Russell's "Water Supply Engineering." 
Professor Marston. 

Course XXIII. — Masonry Structures. — Four recitations 
per week throughout the first term, Senior Year. Text- 
book, Bakers "Masonry Structures." The work consists 
in the study of the principles involved in the design and 
construction of foundations, and in the design, construc- 
tion and maintenance of all classes of masonry structures. 
Professor Marston. 

Course XXIV. — Practical Astronomy. — Two recitations 
and three hours field work per week, second term, Senior 
year. Required, Mathematics, VII and IX. 

The work covers the ordinary methods of determin- 
ing latitude, longitude and time, with their application to 
Geodetic Surveying. Textbook, Hayford's "Practical As- 
tronomy." Miss Wilson. 

Course XXV. — Thesis. — Credit equivalent to one reci- 
tation per week throughout the first term, Senior year, is 
given for the thesis work required during that term. See 
Course XX VI. Professor Marston. 

Course XXVI. — Thesis.- Creuit equivalent to three rec- 
i bilious per week throughout the second term, Senior year, 
is given for the thesis work required that term. The 
credits for thesis, Courses XXV and XXVI, require at least 
three hours per week thesis work throughout the first 
term, Senior year, and nine hours per week throughout 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 171 

the second term, Senior year. Students are required to 
put in as much additional time as may be necessary to 
thoroughly work up the subject chosen, and to prepare a 
well-digested and complete write-up of the results. Most 
students devote much extra time to the work. The sub- 
ject chosen must be one requiring original work. It may 
be the study and design of some engineering project (in- 
cluding the surveys), the investigation of some engineering 
question, or an experimental investigation. Professor 
Marston. 

Course XXVII. — Engineering Seminar. — Credit is given 
equivalent to one recitation per week, first term, Junior 
year. See Course XXX. Professor Marston. 

Course XXVIII. — Engineering Seminar. — Credit is giv- 
en equivalent to one recitation per week, second term, 
Junior year. See Course XXX. Professor Marston. 

Course XXIX. — Engineering Seminar. — Credit is given 
equivalent to one recitation per week, first term, Senior 
year. See Course XXX. Professor Marston. 

• Course XXX. — Engineering Seminar. — Credit is given 
equivalent to one recitation per week, second term, Senior 
year. 

The Civil Engineering Seminar, Courses XXVI I to 
XXX, inclusive, meets once each week, while College is in 
session, and has for its members the Professors and the 
Instructor in Civil Engineering, and all students in the 
Junior and Senior classes in tne course in Civil Engineer- 
ing At each meeting four students give "journal reviews" 
of the most timely articles and topics found in the current 
numbers of the technical journals, a large number of which 
are regularly taken by the College Library. Another stu- 
dent then reads a paper on some engineering subject. Both 
the journal review and the paper are discussed by the other 
members of the Seminar. The subjects for the papers 
follow a regular, connected program, arranged in advance 
for each term. Professor Marston. 



172 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Course XXXI. — Summer Surveying. — Fifteen entire 
days' work in the field in the summer vacation following 
the Freshman year. See Course XXXIII. Professor 
Marston and Professor Neville. 

Course XXXII. — Summer Surveying. — Fifteen entire 
days' work in the field in the summer vacation following 
the Sophomore year. See Course XXXIII. Professor 
Marston and Professor Neville. 

Course XXXIII. — Summer Surveying. — Fifteen entire 
days' work in the field in the summer vacation following 
the Junior year. 

In the work of Courses XXXI to XXXIII, inclusive, the 
Professors of Civil Engineering and the students in the 
Course in Civil Engineering go into camp for fifteen days 
each summer vacation, beginning the Saturday before 
Commencement, and conduct an organized topographical 
survey of some region in the state. Each year's work 
continues that of the preceding year, until a large area is 
mapped. At present a strip about three miles wide, half 
on each side of the Des Moines river, south of Boone, is 
being mapped. Lower classmen will serve in subordinate 
positions. Upper classmen will have responsible charge of 
parties, and will do the triangulating and final mapping. 
All camp equipage, including tents and cooking utensils, 
will be furnished by the College. Students must pay their 
own traveling and living expenses.. A corps of student 
officers has direct charge of the work, which is supervised 
by Professor Marston and Professor Neville. 

COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

ACADEMIC YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Algebra, 5. (Mathematics, I.) 

English, 5. (English, I.) 

History, 5. (Elocution, I.) 






DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 



173 



Drawing, 2. 
♦Field Work, 2. 



(Mechanical Engineering, XIX.) 
(Civil Engineering, II. J 



SECOND TERM. 



Algebra, 5. 

Plane Geometry, 5. 

Elementary Rhetoric, 5. 

History, 4. 

Drawing, 2. 

*Field Work, 2. 



(Mathematics, II or III.) 

(Mathematics, V.) 

(English, II.) 

(History, II. A.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XX.) 

(Civil Engineering, III.) 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Advanced Algebra, G. 
French, 5, or 
German, 5. s 

Advanced Rhetoric, 5. * 
Mechanical Drawing, 2. 
Lettering, 1. 
**Field Work, 2. 
Military Drill, 2. 
**Shop Work, 2. 
Library Work, 4 hours. 



FIRST TERM. 

(Mathematics, IV.) 

(Languages, II.) 

(Languages, V.) 

(English, III.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXI.) 

(Civil Engineering, 1.) 

(Civil Engineering, II.) 

(Military, I.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXIX.) 

(Library, I.) 



SECOND TERM. - 

i 

Solid Geometry and Plane Trigonometry, 5. 

(Mathematics, VI.) 



French, 5, or 
German, 5. 
Composition, 1. 
Descriptive Geometry, 5. 
Drawing, 2. 
**Field Work, 2. 
Military Drill, 2. 
**Shop Work, 2, 



(Languages, II.) 

(Languages, VI.) 

(English, IV:) 

(Civil Engineering, IV.) 

(Civil Engineering, V.) 

(Civil Engineering, III.) 

(Military, II.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXXIII.) 

♦Optional. 

"♦Students who have completed Field Work can elect shop 
work. 



174 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

*Summer Surveying, 2V 2 weeks. 



(Civil Engineering, XXXI.) 
SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 



Analytical Geometry 


, 5. 




(Mathematics, VIII.) 


Physics, 5. 






(Physics, III.) 


Surveying, 4. 






(Civil Engineering, VIII.) 


Chemistry, 5. 






(Chemistry, III.) 


Drawing, 1. 






Civil Engineering, VI.) 


Composition, 1. 






(English, V.) 


Military Drill, 2. 






(Military, III.) 




SECOND 


TF.KM. 


Calculus, 5. 






(Mathematics, IX.) 


Physics, ^. 






(Hiysics, IV.) 


Surveying, 4. 






(Civil Engineering, IX.) 


Chemistry, 5. 






(Chemistry, VI.) 


Drawing, 1. 






(Civil Engineering, VII.) 


Composition, 1. 






(English, VI.) 


Military Drill, 2. 






(Military, Iv^.) 


♦Summer Surveying, 


2M> 


weeks. 








(Civil Engineering, XXI.) 




JUNIOR 


YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 

Analytical Mechanics, 4. (Mechanical Engineering, I.) 

Electricity and Magnetism, 3. (Physics, VI.) 

Political Economy, 5. (Economic Science, I.) 

Railway Engineering, 5. (Civil Engineering, X.) 

Physical Laboratory, 2. (Physics, XIV.) 

Seminar, 1. (Civil Engineering, XXVII.) 
••♦Historic Development XlXth Century, 2 .(History, VII.) 

♦♦Debating, 1. (English, VII.) 

SECOND TERM. 

Analytical Mechanics, 4. (Mechanical Engineering, I.) 

Materials of Construction, :!. (Mechanical Engineering, III.) 
Roads and Pavements, 2. (Civil Engineering, XII.) 

'All students in Civil Engineering go into camp fifteen days each 
summer vacation :uh1 conduct an organized topographical survey. 

•♦Elective, subject to approval of Professor of Civil Kn^ineering. 

♦•♦Elective in eithei terra <>!' Junior or Senior year, subject to 
approval of Professoi of Civil Engineering. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 



175 



Railway Engineering, 5. 
Spherical Trigonometry, 2. 
Structural Designing, 2. 
Engineering Laboratory, 2. 
Seminar, i. 



(Civil Engineering, XI.) 

(Mathematics, XII.) 

(Civil Engineering, XIII.) 

(Civl Engineering, XIV.) 

(Civil Engineering, XXVII.) 



••♦Historic Development XlXth Century, 2. (History, VII.) 
pummer Surveying, 2 1-2 weeks. 

(Civil Engineering, XXXIII.) 
In place of the two and a half weeks' summer surveying 
for any year there may be substituted not less than three 
weeks actual engineering work done for some competent 
engineer, a reputable firm, or department engaged in en- 
gineering work. 
'Debating, 1. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
first Term. 
Framed Structures, 5. (Civil Engineering, XVII.) 

Hydraulics, 4. (Mechanical Engineering, VI.) 

Masonry Structures and Foundations, 4. (C. E., XXII.) 

Stereotomy, 2. (Civil Engineering, XX.) 

Sanitary Engineering, 3. (Civil Engineering, XXI.) 

Engineering Laboratory, 1. (Civil Engineering, XV.) 

♦♦Historic Development XlXth Century, 2. (History, VII.) 
Thesis, 1. (Civil Engineering, XXV.) 

Seminar, 1. (Civil Engineering, XXIX.) 



SECOND TERM. 



Framed Structures, 2. 

Designing, 4. 

Geology, 4. 

Spherical Astronomy, 3. 

Hydraulic Engineering, 3. 

Engineering Laboratory, 1 



(Civil Engineering, XVIII.) 

(Civil Engineering, XIX.) 

(Geology, III.) 

(C. E. XXIV.) 

(Civil Engineering, XXII.) 

(Civil Engineering, XVI.) 



'♦♦Historic Development XlXth Century, 2. (History, VII.) 
Th esis, 3. (Civil Engineering, XXVI.) 

Seminar, 1. (Civil Engineering, XXX.) 

*A11 students in Civil Engineering- go into camp fifteen days each 
summer vacation and conduct an organized topographical survey. 

**Elective, subject to approval of Professor of Civil En- 
"ing-. 

-*Elective in either term of Junior or Senior year, subject to 
approval of Professor of Civil Engineering. 



176 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

LOUTS BEVIEE SPINNEY, PEOFESSOE. 
B. S. LANPIIEAE, ASSISTANT PEOFESSOE. 

This department aims to meet the needs of young men 
who have in mind the practice of electrical engineering in 
any of its various applications in the business world. 

It has been outlined with a view to securing for the 
student a thorough drill in those sciences, the principles 
of which underlie all electrical engineering practice, to 
secure for him a training in the application of scientific 
principles to the solution of practical problems in engineer- 
ing and to familiarize him with such methods of the labor- 
atory and testing room as are available for practical and 
com mercial determinations. 

'ihe sciences of Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry, 
are emphasized, as it is believed they are of first impor- 
tance in such a course. The attention of the student is di- 
rected to the value of these subjects and he is urged to 
give them his most careful consideration. 

In recognition of the fact that a knowledge of Mechan- 
ical Engineering is essential to many electrical engineering 
operations, a large part of the student's time is devoted to 
a training in this direction. The mechanical engineering 
work required of students in this course, includes mechan- 
ical drawing, shop-work, kinematics, machine design, analy- 
tical mechanics, hydraulics, materials of construction, en- 
gineering laboratory and the study of the steam engine. 

Meebanical Drawing is taken up in the first term of 
the Freshman year and extends through the Sophomore 
year. 

Shop-Work extends to the end of the Junior year and 
Includes work In the carpenter shop, in the forge shop and 
foundry and In tbe machine shop. 

Tn tbe course in Engineering Laboratory the work con- 
sists in the testa of strength of materials, viscosity of oils, 
efficiency of bell transmission, measurement of power, etc. 

The study of the steam engine is made as practical 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 177 

as possible by the taking and studying of indicator cards, 
the setting of valves, the measurement of clearance, etc. 

These several topics are fully discussed elsewhere 
under the head of Mechanical Engineering. 

Physics is the basis of the study of electricity and 
magnetism, the phenomena of which underlie electrical 
engineering theory and design, and is manifestly of suffi- 
cient importance to demand considerable time and atten- 
tion in the training of the electrical engineer. In addition 
to the work in physics prescribed for all engineering 
students, the electrical engineering student spends six to 
twelve hours per week in the Junior and Senior years in 
the physical laboratory and class-room. 

Specialization begins in the Junior year with the ad- 
vanced course in Electricity and Magnetism. 

Laboratory work begins in the first term of the Junior 
year with a two hour (i. e. two afternoons per week) course 
in general physics. Laboratory work in electricity and 
magnetism, including work in the dynamo room and testing 
laboratory extends throughout the last two years of the 
course. 

The first work in the physical laboratory embodies the 
accurate measurements of length, mass and time, the 
adjustment and use of physical instruments and the deter- 
minations of physical constants. In the laboratory course 
in electricity and magnetism the student makes a study 
of primary and secondary batteries and the electrical 
instruments of the laboratory, the determination of the 
constants of measuring instruments and the methods of 
measuring the several electrical quantities. 

The laboratory work in Light and Sound consists 
largely in photometric measurements of various forms of 
commercial lamps. 

In the laboratory work of the Senior year the more 
practical applications of the principles of electro-magnetism 
are studied, altogether with the principles of the magnetic 
circuit, of current flow, etc. 

The topics of electric wiring, power transmission, elec- 
tro-chemistry, telegraphy, telephony and electric signalling 



178 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

receive special attention in the latter part of the course. 
The laboratory work in these various topics is made to 
conform to the text-book and lecture work. 

The study of alternating currents and alternating 
current machinery is taken up in the Senior year. In the 
class-room work much stress is placed upon the theory of 
alternating currents and in the laboratory the student is 
afforded opportunity to study and familiarize himself with 
the phenomena peculiar to such currents. 

The department possesses seventeen experimental dyna- 
mos, including two arc machines, one 250 light Diamond 
Alternator and one 10 light Pony alternator; also one 25- 
horse-power M. P. Ahlms-Edwards, direct-current motor 
and other series and shunt wound continuous-current 
machines. There are also transformers of various types 
and a secondary battery of fifty cells. 

In addition to this equipment the student has access, 
for experimental and test purposes, to the electric machin- 
ery of the College power house and lighting plant. Among 
other machines in this plant are two 15 K. W. Edison dyna- 
mos, one four-pole 18 K. W. compound-wound generator by 
the American Engine Company, one 15 K. W. alternator, 
and one 30 K. W. alternator. There is also a series of 
motors for driving the machinery of the Mechanical Engi- 
neering Department which range in size from five to twelve 
horse-power, which are available for test purposes. 

An extended system of wiring connects all rooms of 
the department with the switchboards of the dynamo labor- 
atory and the apparatus room. At these switchboards are 
the terminals of a line connecting with a 110 volt, 150 am- 
pere, direct-current machine, which is available as a current 
source during the day. During the evening hours there are 
available 110 volt direct or alternating current circuits. 

The courses offered by the Department of Electrical 
Engineering are outlined specifically below. The course 
numbers are those given in the discussion of courses 
Offered by the Department of Physics. 

Coi i:si; III.- Mcclianics and heal, first term. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 179 

Course IV. — Light and Sound, Electricity and Magnet- 
>m, second term. Two lectures and three recitations per 
week. Mathematics IV, V and VI required. Course III is a 
prerequisite of Course IV. 

In this course stress is placed upon the fundamental 
principles of the subject and a very thorough study is 
made of vector quantities and their graphical treatment in 
problem work. 

The various subjects are discussed from a mathemat- 
ical standpoint, and the student is urged to familiarize 
himself with the theoretical side of the work, as it is 
belived such a foundation is very helpful, if not absolutely 
essential to the work which follows. Text-book, Hastings 
and Beach, "General Physics." Professor Spinney and Mr. 
Tuttle. 

Course VI. — Electricity and Magnetism. — Three hours 
per week, first term. Physics III and IV and Mathematics 
VI 11 required. 

Lectures, recitations and problem work. A course in 
the elementary theory of electricity and magnetism. Dis- 
cussion of the principles of electro-magnetic action and 
their application in various forms of measuring instruments 
and the development of laboratory methods of measuring 
the several electrical quantities. 

Text-book, Nichols and Franklin's 'Elements of Phy- 
sics," Vol. II. Professor Lanphear. 

Course X. — Dynamo Electric Machinery. — Lectures and 
recitations, four hours per week, second term. Physics VI 
is a prerequisite of this course. 

General theory of the direct-current dynamo, the estab- 
lishment of the electro-motive forces by induction, the mag- 
netic circuit, armature winding, etc. A study of "character- 
istic curves" and the adaption of the different types of di- 
rect-current machinery to various commercial purposes is 
included. 

As a text and reference book S. P. Thompson's "Dyna- 
mo Electric Machinery" is used. Professor Lanphear. 



180 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Couuse XL — Alternating Currents. — Lectures and reci- 
tations, four hours per week, first term. Physics X 
required. 

Discussion of the theory of alternating currents, study 
of the circuit containing se!f4nduction and capacity, 
methods of measuring currents, electro-motive force and 
power in alternating current circuits. 

Text-book, Jackson's "Alternating Currents and Alter- 
nating Current Machinery." Professor Spinney. 

Couese Ail. — Applied Electricity. — Lectures and Prob- 
lems, four hours per week, second term. Physics XI 
required. 

Continuation of Course XL Study of alternating cur- 
rent machinery — dynamos, transformers, etc., including a 
discussion of the synchronous motor, the induction motor, 
the rotary transformer and poylphase current machinery. 

Discussion of high-potential transmission lines and 
electrical machinery adapted to transmission purposes. 

Text-books and references, Jackson's "Alternating 
Currents and Alternating Current Machinery," Franklin 
and Williamson's "Alternating Currents," Thompson's 
"Polyphase Electric Currents," Bedell and Crehore's "Alter- 
nate Currents," etc. Professor Spinney. 

Course XIII. — 'Telephony. — Lectures and Recitations, 
one hour per week, second term. A general study of th* 
principles of telephony, the telephone, telephone lines, ca 
bles and commercial apparatus. Open to Seniors in Electric- 
al Engineering as an elective. Professor Lanphear. 

Course XIV. — General Physical Laboratory. — Two af- 
ternoons per week, first term. Measurement of length, mass 
and time, determination of physical constants, use of the 
barometer, thermometry, calorimetry, etc. Professor Spin- 
ney and Mr. Tuttle. 

COURSE XV. — Physical Laboratory, Elementary Electri- 
cal Measurements. — One afternoon per week, second term, or 

COURSE XVI. — Two afternoons per week, first term, or 

COURSE XVII. — Two afternoons per week, second term. 
The measurement, of the electro-motive force and internal 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 181 

resistance of primary and secondary batteries, the use of 
Wheatstone's bridge, measurement of current, determina- 
tion of galvanometer constants, high resistance measure- 
ments, insulation tests, etc. Professor Spinney and Mr, 
Tuttle. 

Course XVIII. — Physical Laboratory, Electrical Testing, 
— Two afternoons per week, first term, or, 

Course XIX. — Two afternoons per week, second term. 
Calibration of instruments, absolute measurements, etc. 
Professor Spinney and Mr. Tuttle. 

Course XX. — Physical Laboratory, Dynamo, Motor and 
Commercial Plant Testing. — Three afternoons per week, first 
term. 

The efficiencies of dynamos and motors, experimental 
determination of characteristic curves, magnetic leakage, 
etc. Critical study of commercial plants, determination of 
efficiencies, etc. Professor Lanphear. 

Course XXI. — Physical Laboratory, — Study of alternate 
ing currents. Two afternoons per week, second term, 
Senior year. 

Measurements of alternating current circuits, experi- 
mental determination of mutual and self-inductances, ca- 
pacities, etc. 

The study of alternating current dynamos and motors 
and commercial transformers is included. Professor 
Spinney. 

Course XXII.- — Electric Circuits. — Two lectures per 
week, first term. Physics VI required. 

Determination of size of leads, allowable cross-section 
of conductors from the standpoint of economy, taking into 
consideration current prices of copper, etc., the rates of 
interest and the cost of electrical energy. Professor Lam 
phear. 

Course XXIII. — Electric Designing. — The designs of 
batteries, commercial ammeters, voltmeters, wattmeters, 
etc. One afternoon per week, second term, Junior year, 
and 

Course XXIV. — Electric Designing. — Two afternoons 
per week, first term, Senior year. Continuation of Course 
XXIII. Professor Lanphear. 



182 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Course XXV. — Electric Designing. — The design of dy- 
namos, motors and transformers, etc. Two afternoons per 
week, second term, Senior year. Professor Lanphear. 

Course XXVI. — Thesis begun, and 

Course XXVII. — Thesis finished. Total equivalent of 
four hours per week of one term. 

Each student in the course of Electrical Engineering 
is required to prepare a thesis in the Senior year represent- 
ing, in the work done upon it, the equivalent of at least 
four hours per week week of one term. 

This thesis may be of the nature of the design and 
construction of some electrical machine or measuring in 
strument, the efficiency test and critical study of some 
dynamo-electro machine or power plant, or of electrical 
research work of special direction. 

Course XXIX. — Electrical Seminar. — One hour per 
week, first term and 

Course XXX. — Electrical seminar. — One hour per week, 
second term. A continuance of Course XXIX. Professor 
Spinney. 

This course consists of the preparation, presentation 
and discussion of papers upon special assigned topics in 
electrical engineering. 

It is required that the papers presented shall be care- 
fully written out and submitted for critical reading to the 
Professor in charge. 

Journal reading is made part of this course. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 
ACADEMIC YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Algebra, 5. (Mathematics, I.) 

English, 5. (English, I.) 

History, 5. (History, I.) 

Blocutlon, 2. (Elocution, 1.1 

Drawing, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XIX.) 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 



183 



SECOND TERM. 



Algebra, 5. 

Plane Geometry, 5. 

Elementary Rhetoric, 5. 

History, 4. 

Drawing, 2. 



(Mathematics, II or III.) 

(Mathematics, V.) 

(English, II.) 

(History, HA.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XX.) 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Advanced Algebra, 5. 
French, 5, or 
German, 5. 

Advanced Rhetoric, 5. 
Shop-Work, 2. 
Mechanical Drawing, 2. 
Military Drill, 2. 
Library Work, 4 hours. 



FIRST TERM. 

(Mathematics, IV.) 

(Languages, I.) 

(Languages, V.) 

(English, III.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXIX.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXI.) 

(Military, I.) 

(Library, 1.) 



SECOND TERM. 

Solid Geometry and Plane Trionometry, 5. 

(Mathematics, VI.) 



French. 5, or 
German, 5. 
Composition, 1. 
Descriptive Geometry, 
Shop-Work, 2. 
Military Drill, 2. 



(Languages, II.) 

(Languages, VI.) 

(English, IV.) 

(Civil Engineering, IV.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXX.) 

(Military, II.) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Analytical Geometry, 5. 
Physics, 5. 
Chemistry, 5. 
Shop-Work, 2. 
Mechanical Drawing, 2. 
Composition, 1. 
Military Drill, 2. 



FIRST TERM. 

(Mathematics, VIII.) 

(Physics, III.) 

(Chemistry, III.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXXI.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXII.) 

(English, V.) 

(Military, III.) 



184 



IOWA STATE COLLEU15. 



Calculus, 5. 
Physics, 5. 
Chemistry, 5 
Shop-Work, 2. 
Mechanical Drawing, 2 
Composition, 1. 
Military Drill, 2. 



SECOND TERM. 

(Mathematics, IX.) 

(Physics, IV.) 

(Chemistry, VI.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXXI II.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXII.) 

(English, VI.) 

(Military, IV.) 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Differential Equations, 3. 
Analytical Mechanics, 4. 
Electricity and Magnetism, 
Political Economy, 5. 
Engineering Laboratory, 1. 



FIRST TERM. 

(Mathematics, X.) 
(Mechanical Engineering, I.) 
3. (Physics, VI.) 

(Economic Science, I.) 
(Mechanical Engineering, XII.) 
Shop- Work, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XXXIII.) 

**Historic Development XlXth Century, 2. (History, VII.) 
♦Debating, 1. (English, VII.) 

Physical Laboratory, 2. (Physics, XIV.) 

SECOND TERM. 

Analytical Mechanics, 4. (Mechanical Engineering, II.) 

Dynamo-Electric Machinery, 4. (Physics, X.) 

Steam Engine, 3. (Mechanical Engineering, IV.) 

Materials of Construction, 3. (Mechanical Engineering, III.) 
Electrical Design, 1. (Physics, XXIII.) 

Engineering Laboratory, 1. (Mechanical Engineering, XIII.) 
Physical Laboratory, 2. (Physics, XVI 1. 1 

Shop-Work, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XXXIV.) 

**Historic Development XlXth Century, 2. (History, VII.) 
♦Debating, 1. (English, VIII.) 

SENIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Alternating Currents, 4. (Physics, XI.) 

Hydraulics, 4. (Mechanical Engineering, VI.) 

Steam Engine, Design, 3. (Mechanical Engineering, VII.) 

•Elective, eubjed (<> the approval of the Professor of Elec- 
i rica ! Engineering. 

**Elec1 Ive In <-ii her tei m of Junior or Senior year subjecl to the ap- 
proval of Professor of Electrical Engineering. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 185 

Physical Laboratory, 3. (Physics, XX.) 

Electrical Design, 1. (Electrical Engineering, XXIV.) 

Electric Circuits, 2. (Electrical Engineering, XXII.) 

♦♦Historic Development XlXth Century, 2. (History, VII.) 

Seminar, 1. (Electrical Engineering, XXIX.) 

Thesis, 1. (Electrical Engineering, XXVI.) 

SECOND TERM. 

Constructing Engineering, 3. (Mechanical Engineering, IX). 
Physical Laboratory, 2. (Physics, XXI.) 

Electric Design, 3. (Electrical Engineering, XXV.) 

Applied Electricity, 4. (Physics, XII.) 

♦Telephony, 1. (Electrical Engineering, XIII.) 

♦♦Historic Development XlXth Century, 2. (History, VIi.) 
Seminar, 1. (Electrical Engineering, XXX.) 

Thesis, 3. (Electrical Engineering, XXVII.) 

DEPARTMENT OF MINING ENGINEERING. 

SAMUEL WALKER BEYER, PROFESSOR. 
MR, WILLIAMS AND MR. YOUNG, ASSISTANTS. 

The courses in Mining Engineering are planned to 
give the student a ready familiarity with the branches 
which form the ground work of the science of Mining and 
Metallurgy. The department of Mining Engineering aims 
to give him such a thorough training in the fundamentals 
as will enable him after graduation to acquire in a com- 
paratively short time the practical experience absolutely 
necessary before he is fitted to assume positions of great 
responsibility in the mining industries. The Department 
offers three courses: A four years; a two years; and a 
one term course. The first is intended for those students 
who desire a "thorough course in Theoretical and Practical 
Mining," and underlying sciences, and leads to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Mining Engineering. The re- 
quirements for admission are the same as those for admis- 
sion to other Engineering courses. Students who pursue 
this course to completion are expected to be able to under- 
take the "full management of mining in its various 

♦Elective. 

**Elective in either term of Junior or Senior year subject to the ap- 
proval of Professor of Electrical Engineering. 



186 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

branches," at least as practiced in Iowa and to become 
familiar with the principles involved and the methods em- 
ployed in good mining engineering practice in general. 

The second course is designed for young men who 
have had some practical experience in mines, and wish to 
study mine surveying, drafting, the problems of ventila- 
tion, drainage, haulage, mine operating, etc., and also to 
learn something of the sciences which bear upon their 
work but have neither the time nor the preparation for a 
full College course. Elementary mathematics, drawing and 
shop-work receive considerable Attention during the first 
year, while the professional studies are reserved for the 
second year. Candidates who are twenty-one years of age j 
or over are admitted without examination. All others 
must give evidence of a thorough grounding. in the com- 
mon branches. 

The third is specially adapted to men actively employed 
in the mining industry, but who have neither time nor the 
opportunity to prepare themselves to meet the entrance 
requirements for the regular four years' course or to spare 
the time to complete the two years' course. It is intended 
more particularly for a review course for mine superin- 
tendents, mine foremen, and the more progressive miners. 
The course embraces a review of the principles of mine 
ventilation and drainage; mine operation and equipment; 
mine surveying and accounts; mechanical engineering ap- 
plied to mining; the principles of prospecting, mode of 
occurrence and distribution of the economic products. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The Department of Mining Engineering is located in 
Morrill Hall*, dividing quarters with the Department of 
Geology. The description of rooms, collections and appal 
atua which may be found under the latter department will 

•Beginning with the Fall <>f L902, the Departments of Mi 
ami Geology will have quarters in the new Engineering Hall 
now being erected. 






DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 187 

apply almost equally as well to mining engineering. In 
addition to the apparatus previously listed and described, 
the department is supplied with a Sullivan core drill with 
a complete set of tools and accessories for actual field 
operations; a "Queen" Light Mountain mining transit; and 
l "Bergen" No. 4 Mining transit with interchangeable side 
and top telescope; a sensitive six-dial, anemometer reading 
to ten millions of feet and adapted for the measurement of 
currents of air through mines and umnels— an instrumnt ab- 
solutely necessary m order to deal intelligently with the 
problems of mine ventilation; a miner's level with rods and 
measuring tape; a plane table with accessories; a set of min- 
er's tools; a barometer, clinometer, balances, a series of min- 
er's lamps an. various instruments used in ascertaining dis- 
tances. 

The proximity of Ames to the Iowa coal fields affords 
easy access to the coal mines at Boone and Des Moines. 
The great centers of the clay industries, Des Moines. Boono 
and Fort Dodge are equally accessible, while the quarries 
of Marshall County are scarcely more than an hour's ride 
from the College. These and numerous allied industries 
are, after all, the most important and indispensible labora- 
tories for the practical mining engineer. The department 
undertakes to present the accepted theories concerning 
mineral aggregation, origin and occurrence, but these the- 
ories can only be put to the test by an intelligent use of 
the drill, the level and the plane table. The accredited 
methods of winning the ores and minerals receive full 
discussion in the class-room, but only render obvious the 
necessity of becoming familiar with the practical workings 
of the sluice box, the tipple and the stamp mill. The 
chemical and physical properties of a clay may be ascer- 
tained in the laboratory, but a complete knowledge of its 
properties and its proper mode of treatment can only be 
gained by following it from the pit to the street. In short, 
the department aims to give as complete an exposition of 
the theories and laws which underlie the Science of Mining 
as the time will permit, but the verification and application 
of these theories and laws must be made, in large measure 
in the field and in the industries. 



188 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

COURSES IN MINING. 

The work of the first two years in the four years' course 
in Mining Engineering is exactly the same as that required 
in the course in Mechanical Engineering, with the excep- 
tion that Surveying takes the place of Mechanical Drawing. 
The professional studies are given due prominence during 
the last two years of the course and the student is required 
to take continuous work in mining, chemistry and geology 
through the last three terms. He is expected to make one 
of these branches the subject of special investigation and 
to embody the results of such investigation in a thesis, 
which is required of every student who is a candidate for 
graduation. 

It is generally recognized that there is of necessity a 
considerable gap between the work included in the College 
curriculum and that of the professional engineer; and that 
the student in Engineering must gain the larger part of his 
professional training outside of college walls. The courses 
in summer field work are offered in the hope that his ap- 
prenticeship may be reduced to a minimum, and are re- 
quired of all students in the four years' course in Mining 
Engineering. 

Course I. — The Principles of Mining. — Second term. 
Junior year, and counts four hours per week. The first ten 
weeks of the term are devoted to a consideration of the 
methods employed in excavating, boring and shaft-sinking, 
and in mining and the support of mine excavations, while 
the remainder of the term is given up to a critical study 
of methods employed in exploration, development and mine 
working in general. 

Coi rse II. — Continuation of Course T. — Four hours per 
weeh and runs through the first, term, Senior year. The 
worl< embraces a thorough discussion of the principles 
Involved In coal mining in general and is followed by a 
careful consideration of those principles which are appli- 
cable to the Iowa coal fields in particular. Mine ventila- 
tion, drainage and lighting receive due attention. 









DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 189 

Course III. — Mining Engineering. — Second term, Senior 
jrear, and counts four hours per week. Mine plant, admin- 
istration and mine accounts receive especial attention. The 
term's work involves a critical study of mining machinery, 
with especial reference to the types hest adapted to meet 

requirements of the various conditions in actual prac- 
Also mine buildings and the general equipment and 

inistration of a mine plant are considered. At the 
beginning of the term's work, a short period is given to a 
theoretical consideration of ore-dressing. 

Course IV. — Seminar. — Required of all students in 
Mining Engineering and counts one hour during the Junior 
and Senior years. 

Course V. — Thesis. — Required of all candidates for grad- 
uation in the course of Mining Engineering and counts one 
hour during the first term, Senior year, and three hours 
during the second term. 

Course VI. — Ventilation and Haulage. — Five hours per 
week, first term of the two years' course in Mining. The 
work of the term is devoted to a careful consideration of 
the problems effecting the distribution of air in mines and 
mine drainage. Some attention is given to the discussion 
of standard methods of hoisting and haulage in mines. 

Course VII. — Mine Exploration and Operation. — Five 
hours per week during the last term in the two years' 
course in Mining. Exploration, shafting, timbering, and 
methods of mine operation, especially as adapted to the 
Iowa roal fields are the principle topics treated. Mine 
accounts and administration receive such attention as 
their importance and the time will permit. 

Course VIII. — Mining Arithmetic. — Five hours per week 
first term of first year in the two years' course in Mining. 
The fundamental operations in arithmetic are reviewed 
rapidly during the first half of the term, while measure- 
ments, square and cube root and practical problems relat- 
ing to mining are made duly prominent during the last half 
of the term. 

Course VIII (a). — Mining Arithmetic. — Five hours per 
week in the review course in Mining Engineering. Includes 



190 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 






the application of the fundamental operations in arithmetic 
to mining problems. 

Course IX. — One-Term Course in Mining. — Five hours 
per week. The leading topics considered are the principles 
employed in exploring, shafting, timbering, draining and 
ventilating coal mines. The use of explosives and coal 
cutting machinery also receives some attention. 

Course X. — Field Work in Mine Surveying. — First term, 
first year in the two years' course in Mining Engineering. 
The first year men serve as apprentices in the work of 
mine surveying, acting in the capacity of rod-men and 
chain-men to the parties conducted by higher classmen. 

Course XI. — A Continuation of Course X. — During the 
first half of the term on account of the usual inclemency of 
the weather, one half day per week is devoted to a study 
of mine plats and maps. 

Course XII. — Field Work in Mining. — First term, second 
year, and required of students in the two years' course in 
Mining. 

Course XIII. — Continues the Work of Course XTT. — Spec- 
ial attention is directed to mine operation and equipment. 

Course XIV. — Ceramics. — The work of the term is de- 
voted to a consideration of the origin, composition, proper- 
ties and distribution of the crude materials used in the clay 
and cement industries. The physical properties of clays, 
are studied and mechanical analyses are made in the lab- 
oratory, parallelling the? class-room work. 

Course XV. — Ceramics. — The course includes a discus- 
sion of the principles involved in the manufacture of clay | 
goods. Methods of selecting and winning of the raw ma- 
terials, their preparation, standard processes of manufac- 
ture, burning and clay testing are treated as fully as the 
i in" will permit. 

Coi use XVI. -Bummer Field Work in Mine Surveying] 
- The work is carried on in one of the coal mining districts 
of the state and comprises the complete survey of a mine 
and a thorough examination or the equipment and mode of 
operation of a typical mine for the district, and leads in 



t 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 191 

the first place to a mine map, and in the second to a care- 
ful report on a mine property, accompanied by the neces- 
sary illustrations. The time required is two full weeks. 
Open to students who have completed the Freshman or 
Sophomore years. 

Course XVII. — Summer Field Work in the Study of 
Operation and Equipment, and of Concentrating 
Plait is. — This course necessitates a visit to one of the great 
metal producing centers outside of the state. A careful 
study of mine properties is made, and a detailed report, 
properly illustrated by sketches and drawings, is required. 
A portion of the time is devoted to a study of ore dressing 
and concentrating plants. The time required is four weeks, 
and the course is open to students who have completed the 
Junior or Senior years. 

Courses in Geology required of students in Four Year 
Course in Mining Engineering. 

Course II. — General Geology. — Five hours per week 
ppn first half of Junior Year. This course embraces a discus- 
nt sion of the principles which form the groundwork of the 
,j f science. The first ten weeks are devoted to dynamic and 
p structural geology and the last six weeks to stratigraphic 
c l Jt and historical geology. The student is required to make 
,] arl # several excursions to points of geological interest to verify 
lull , the more salient facts discussed in the class-room. Prere- 
quisites: Physics III and IV and Chemistry III and IV. 

Course IV. — Geology. Advanced. — Five hours per week 
(W second term of Senior Year. The nature, mode of occur- 
in* ence and origin of the minerals and rocks which constitute 
iifaf the earth's crust, are considered in some detail in the first 
half of the term, while rock alteration as involved in meta- 
rnorphism and weathering receives special attention during 
the second half. Excursions are continued as in Course 
II, and students are encouraged to familiarize themselves 
mil with the Methods employed in doing research work and to 
make independent observations. Prerequisite: Geology II. 
Course VI. — Mineralogy. — Three hours class-room and 



192 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



one hour laboratory per week, second half of Junior Year. I 
This course is intended to give the student a clear idea of 
the morphological and physical properties of crystalline 
substances. Prerequisites: Physics III and IV, Chemistry • 
III and IV and Mathematics VI. 



Course VII. — Mineralogy. Descriptive and Deiermin-i 
alive. — Three hours class-room work and one hour labora- 



tory per week, first term of Senior Year. This work is 
devoted to the study of the more important mineral species, 
their properties, uses, distribution and methods of deter- 
mination. 

Course IX. — The Geology of Coal. — Five hours per 
week in the review course in mining. The processes of 
erosion, transportation and sedimentation are hastily re- 
viewed and the origin, mode of accumulation and distribu 
tion of coal are treated in some detail. Rock structure, »l 
with especial reference to scientific prospecting and theiB 
economic mining of coal receives due attention. 



MINING ENGINEERING. 



ACADEMIC YEAR. 



FIRST TERM 



Algebra, 5. 
English, 5. 
History, f>. 
Elocution, 2. 
Drawing, 2. 



Algebra, n. 
Plane Geometry, r>. 
Blementary Rhetoric, 
History, 4. 
Drawing, 2. 



(Mechanical 



SECOND TKRM. 



(Mathematics, I.) 

(English, I.) 

(History, I.) 

(Elocution, I.) 

Engineering, XIX.) 



(Mathematics, II or III.) 

(Mathematics, V.) 

(English, II.) 

(History, IIA.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XX.) 






DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 



193 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



Advanced Algebra, 5. 
French, 5, or 
German, 5. 

Advanced Rhetoric, 5. 
Shop-Work, 2. 
Mechanical Drawing, 2. 
Lettering, 1. 
Military Drill, 2. 



(Mathematics, IV.) 

(Languages, I.) 

(Languages, V.) 

(English, III.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXIX.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXI.) 

(Civil Engineering, I.) 

(Military, I.) 



SECOND TERM. 



i- Solid Geometry and Plane Trigonometry, 5. 



k 

ii- French, 5, or 

German, 5. 

Composition, 1. 

Descriptive Geometry, 5. 

-'hop-Work, 2. 

Military Drill, 2. 

:ianical Drawing, 2. 



'Summer Field WorK, Two Weeks. 



(Mathematics, VI.) 

(Languages, II.) 

(Languages, VI.) 

(English, IV.) 

(Civil Engineering, IV.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXX.) 

(Military, II.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXII.) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 

(Mathematics, VIII.) 

(Civil Engineering, VIII.) 

(Physics, III.) 

(Chemistry, III.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXII.) 

(English, V.) 

(Military, III.) 



analytical Geometry, 5. 
Surveying, 4. 
'hysics, 5. 
'liemistry, 5. 
)rawing, 2. 
'omposition, 1. 
lilitary Drill, 2. 

•Students who secure instructive employment during- their 
'imm^r vacations between Freshman-Sophomore and Sopho- 

re-Junior years will be excused from summer field work pro- 
wing they are so employed for at least one month subject to 
'p approval of the head of the department. 






194 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

SECOND TERM. 

Calculus, 5. (Mathematics, D 

Surveying, 4. (Civil Engineering, D 

Physics, 5. (Physics, V 

Chemistry, 5. (Chemistry, V 

Composition, 1. (English, V 

Drawing, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XXII 

Military Drill, 2. (Military, Ft 

*Summer Field Work, Two Weeks. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Analytical Mechanics, 4. (Mechanical Engineering, ) 

Electricity and Magnetism, 3. (Physics, \) 

Geology, 5. (Geology, :) 

Chemistry, 5. (Chemistry, VII and VLJ 

Physical Laboratory, 2. (Physics, XI ) 

****Historic Development XLvth Century, 2. 

(History, vl 
Seminar. (Mining Engineering, ]j| 

♦♦Debating, 1. (English, V.) 

SECOND TERM. 

Analytical Mechanics, 4. (Mechanical Engineering, | 
Steam Engine, 3. (Mechanical Engineering, :jj 

Mineralogy, 4. (Geology, " .) 

Mining, 4. (Mining Engineering, .) 

Chemistry, 5. (Chemistry, ,'f 

♦♦♦♦Historic Development XTXth Century, 2. (History, \J 
Seminar, 1. (Mining Engineering, I 

♦♦Debating, 1. (English, V] .J 

***Sunimev Field Work, Four Weeks. 






♦Students who secure Instructive employment during t 
limine r vacations between Freshman-Sophomore and So; 
more Junior years will be excused from summer field work <>■ 
vldlng they are so employed for at least one month subjecto 
the approval of the head of the department. 

"••Elective, suujecl to the approval of the Professor of Mi 
Engineering. 

♦••Junior students in Mining Engineering who secure 
Btructive employmenl In one of the great metal mining |J 
trlctn of the country will be ex<"U«ed from Junior pummer '1' 
work providing they are so employed for at least six w«w 
subjecl to the approval of the head of the department. 

Elective in either term of. Junior or Senior year, subje 
the approval of Professor of Mining Engineering, 






DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 195 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Hydraulics, 4. (Mechanical Engineering, VI.) 

Mineralogy, 4. (Geology, VII.) 

.Metallurgy, 3. (Chemistry, XII.) 

Mining, 4. (Mining Engineering, II.) 

Engineering Laboratory, 1. (Mechanical Engineering, XII.) 
Specifications and Contracts, 1. 

(Mechanical Engineering, VIII.) 

Historic Development of XlXth Century, 2. (History, VII.) 

Seminar, 1. (Mining Engineering, IV.) 

, Thesis, 1. (Mining Engineering, V.) 

SECOND TERM. 

Materials of Construction, 3. 

(Mechanical Engineering, III.) 

1 Geology, 5. (Geology, IV.) 

viining, 4. (Mining Engineering, III.) 

Engineering Laboratory, 1. (Mechanical Engineering, XIII.) 

■ Historic Development of XlXth Century, 2. (History, VII.) 
Seminar, 1. (Mining Engineering, IV.) 

Thesis, 3. (Mining Engineering, V.) 

TWO YEARS COURSE IN MINING ENGINEERING. 

FIRST YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 



lining Arithmetic, 5. (Mining Engineering, VIII.) 

") Elementary Algebra, 5. (Mathematics, I.) 

Elementary Physics, (Physics, V.) 

'rawing, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XX.) 

• hop-Work, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XXIX.) 

ield Work in Mine Surveying, One-Half Day Per Week. 

(Mining Engineering, X.) 

SECOND TERM. 

sees eometry, 5. (Mathematics, V.) 

anced Algebra, 5. (Mathematics, II.) 

j lane Trigonometry, 5. (Mathematics, VIB.) 

Elective In either term of Junior or Senior year, subject to the 
'roval ot the Professor of Mining Engineering. 



196 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Physical Geography, 3. (Geology, I.) 

Drawing, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XXI.; 

Shop-Work, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XXX.; 

Field Work in Mining One-Half Day Per Week. 

(Mining Engineering, XII 



SECOND YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 






Mining, 5. (Mining Engineering, V. 

Mine Surveying, 3. (Civil Engineering, XXXIV 

Engineering Geology, 4. (Geology, III 

Chemistry, 5. (Chemistry, III 

Mechanical Drawing, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XXII 
Field Work in Mining Engineering, 1. 

(Mining Engineering, XII 
Engineering Laboratory, 1. (Mechanical Engineering, XII 

SECOND TERM. 

Mining, 5. (Mining Engineering, VI) 

Mechanical Engineering, 2. 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXVII 
Economic Geology, 5. (Geology, 

Chemistry, 5. (Chemistry, V; 

Engineering Laboratory, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XII 
Field Work in Mining Engineering, 1. 

(Mining Engineering, XII 

REVIEW COURSE IN MINING ENGINEERING. 

The course begins September 1st, 1902, and Janu.'f 
21st, 1903, and continues sixteen full weeks. It is esped 
ly designed to assist young men to meet the requireme 
Of the law passed by the Legislature of 1899, requiring 
aminations of mine foremen, pit bosses and hoisting e) 
neers. No entrance examination is required. 
Economic Coal Mining, 5. (Mining Engineering, 

Mine Surveying, 3. (Civil Engineering, XXX' 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 197 

vlining Arithmetic, 5. (Mining Engineering, VIII a.) 

xeology of Coal, including Prospecting, 5. (Geology, X.) 
Mechanical Engineering, 2. 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXVIII.) 

COURSE IN CLAY-WORKING AND CERAMICS. 

The short course in Clay-Working is designed to assist 
oung men to a knowledge of the fundamental principles 
/hich underlie the science of Ceramics. The course is 
ffered wit.i a view of extending the same sort of serv- 
^e to the Ceramic industries as the course in Agriculture 
enders to the Agricultural industries, or the course in 
lechanical Engineering renders to the Mechanical indus- 



TWO YEARS COURSE IN CERAMICS. 
FIRST YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 



ementary Mineral Chemistry, 5. 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XIII.) 

lementary Algebra, 5. (Mathematics, I.) 

iementary Physics, 3. (Physics, V.) 

1 rawing, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XX.) 

f hop-Work, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XXIX.) 

,c. 

It SECOND TERM. 

$ 

\< ineral and Geological Chemistry, 5. 

i;; (Agricultural Chemistry, XIV.) 

•${ lane and Solid Geometry, 5. (Mathematics, V.) 

hysical Geography, 3. (Geology, I.) 

r: : rawing, 2. ^Mechanical Engineering, XXI.) 

$ I op-Work, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XXX.) 



SECOND YEAR. 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 
FIRST TERM. 

Chemistry of Clays, 5. (Agricultural Chemistry, XV. 

Ceramics, 5. (Mining Engineering, XIV. 

Engineering Geology, 4. (Geology, III 

Mechanical Drawing, 2. (Mechanical Engineering, XXII 



SECOND TERM. 

Chemistry of Clays and Glazes, 5. 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XVI 
Ceramics, 5. (Mining engineering, XV 

Mechanical Engineering, 2. 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXVIII 
Economic Geology, 5. (Geology, IV 

Testing Clay Products, 3. (Civil Engineering 






TECHNOLOGY. 






The course of instruction in Technology is intended f 
those who may desire to equip themselves for a career 
an industrial field and to which the sciences of chemist 
and engineering are closely related. In the manufacture 
industries the chemist is becoming more and more an i 
portant factor, and the improved manufacturing process 
are largely the results of his investigations. 

The most important manufacturing processes must ' 
constantly under the control of one familiar with eve 
detail, and not only is this knowledge required but it m 
be said that one should be also an expert in obtaining fro 
any process the maximum quantity of a desired prodi 
and a minimum quantity of materials which may be calU 
by-products. 4 

It would naturally appear, therefore, that one who - 
sires to enter an industrial field should have a thoroui 
foundation in chemistry as it is related to the techni 1 
industries and in the engineering sciences. The import. t 
work of the chemist as an aid to developing the indust 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 199 

of the world has been recognized for many years in the 
older countries and the successful manufacturers are those 
who apply the sciences to the greatest extent to the pro- 
cesses which are carried on in their factories. 

With the organization of the manufacturing industries 

of the west there will be a tendency for these organizations 

to follow in the steps of those which have been successful 

in the old countries and as a result there will be a desire 

for well-equipped, scientifically trained men for managers 

md superintendents. With the short time which the young 

nan has at his disposal for his training, it will be readily 

>" seen that his training should have for its object the special 

I ittention to the application of those sciences connected 

•vith the industrial processes and endeavor to equip him 

\\ o such an extent that he can readily specialize in any 

lesired industry. 

With this idea in view the course of study has been 
irranged to present to the student the most important 
tudies in Agricultural, Geological, Analytical, Technical 
it Chemistry and Civil, Mechanical and Electrical Engineer- 
it ng in their relations to his future field of work. 

TECHNOLOGY. 



The Freshman and Sophomore work to consist of the 
rat two years in Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineer- 
g or Electrical Engineering. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM. 

Technical Chemistry 5 Technical Chemistry 5 

Language 5 Language 5 

Engineering Geology 4 Economic Geology 5 

Electricity and Magnetism Botanical Microscopic 

and Physical Laboratory. 5 Chemistry 5 



200 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



SECOND TERM. 



Technical Chemistry 7 Technical Chemistry 7 

Sanitary Engineering 2 Steam Engine 3 

Ceramics 5 Materials of Construction. 3 

Engineering Laboratory. ..2 Engineering Laboratory. ..5 

Bacteriology 2 Water Works Engineering. S 

Specification and Contracts.l Thesis 

Thesis 1 



:: 



UVISION OF SCIENCE AS RELATED TO INDUSTRIES 



MATHEMATICS. 

PHYSICS. 

CHEMISTRY. 

BOTANY. 

ZOOLOGY. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

GEOLOGY. 

ECONOMIC SCIENCE. 

DOMESTIC ECONOMY. 

PHILOSOPHY. 

LITERATURE AND RHETORIC. 

ELOCUTION. 

LATIN. 

MODERN LANGUAGES. 

HISTORY. 

MILITARY SCIENCE. 

LIBRARY. 

MUSIC. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE. 



202 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



FACULTY 



W. M. BEARDSHEAR, A. M., LL. D., 

President. 

M. STALKER, M. Sc, V. S., 
Professor of Veterinary Science. 

EDGAR WILLIAM STANTON. M. Sc, 
Professor of Mathematics and Economic Science. 

GEN. JAMES RUSH LINCOLN, 
Professor of Military Science. 

ALFRED ALLEN BENNETT, M. Sc, 
Professor of Chemistry. 

LOUIS H. PAMMEL, B. Ag., M. Sc, Ph. D., 
Professor of Botany. 

GEORGE WELTON BISSELL, M. E., 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

ANSON MARSTON, C. E., 
Professor of Civil Engineering. 

MISS LIZZIE MAY ALLIS, B. A., M. A., 
Professor of French and German. 

LOUIS BEVIER SPINNEY, B. M. E., M. Sc, 
Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering. 

SAMUEL WALKER BEYER, B. Sc, Ph. D., 
Professor of (Jeology. 

ALVIN B. NOBLE, B. Ph., 
Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature. 

HENRY E. SUMMERS, B. Sc, 
Professor of Zoology. 

ADRIAN M. NEWENS, B. O., 
Professor of Elocution and Oratory and Associate in English. 

•ORANGE HOWARL CESSNA, A. M., D. D., 
Professor of History and Philosophy. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 203 

JOHN H. McNEALL, V. M. D., 
Professor of Anatomy. 

MISS MARY A. SABTN, B. A., 
Professor of Domestic Economy. 

HOMER C. PRICE, M. S. A., 
Professor of Horticulture. 

CARL W. GAY, D. V. M., 

Professor of Veterinary Medicine. 

FRANK J. RESLER, B. Ph., 
Director of Music, Vocalist. 

MISS MARIA M. ROBERTS, B. L., 
Instructor in Mathematics, 

MISS ELMINA T. WILSON, C. E., 
Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

MRS. ELIZABETH RESLER, B. Ph., 
Instructor in Instrumental Music. 

MISS LOLA A. PLACEWAY, B. Sc, 
Instructor in Chemistry. 

MISS BESSIE B. LARRABEE, A. B., 
Instructor in English. 

MISS ORA F. EDGITT, B. Sc, 
Instructor in Chemistry. 

WILBUR M. WILSON, B. M. E., 
Instructor in Free-Hand Drawing. 

MISS ADA J. MILLER, Ph. B., 
Instructer injEnglish. 

MISS ELIZABETH MACLEAN, M. Dt., 
Instructor In English. 

IRA A. WILLIAMS, B. So., 
Assistant in Geology. 

E. B. TUTTLE. B. Sc, 
Instructor in Physics. 

ARTHUR T. ERWIN, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Horticulture. 



204 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

MISS A. ESTELLA PADDOCK, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Botany. 

MISS DELLA JOHNSON, Ph. B., 

Instructor in Domestic Economy. 

MISS ALICE WARD HESS, B. Sc, 
Instructor in Domestic Economy. 

MISS HELEN G. REED, Ph. B., 

Instiuctor in English. 

E. E. LITTLE. M. S. A., 

Assistant in Horticulture. 

MISS VINA ELETHE CLARK, 

Librarian. 

MISS OLIVE E. STEVENS, B. L., 
Assistant Librarian. 

DIVISION OF SCIENCE AS RELATED TO THE 
INDUSTRIES. 

The courses of study in the Division of Science lead 
to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

Many of the courses of study taught in this Division 
form a very essential part of those belonging to the othei 
Divisions, so that the work required for the various 
degrees conferred by the College authorities is very thor 
oughly interwoven. 

The object of the work in this Division is very com 
prehensively expressed in the act of Congress establishing 
this and similar colleges. The foundling of these colleges 
on a basis of scientific learning has proved to be the be- 
ginning of an important epoch in educational mstory. xne 
courses of study in this Division are less technical than 
are many of those of the other Divisions. The real ad 
vances in modern civilization have been along the lines of 
science study and investigations. It is the intent therefore 
to lay a broad foundation in scientific facts and principles 
In order to fit the graduate to fill his place in the affairs 
of the world. There can be no better preparation for the 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 205 

duties of life and for citizenship than the knowledge and 
mental training given by a genuine study of the sciences. 

During the first two years the lines of study are well 
marked out and but little choice of subjects is given. The 
required mathematics end with the Freshman year. The 
subject may be pursued, however, for three terms longer, 
provided the student desires and is qualified to do so. 

The various branches of the study of the English 
language extending throughout the Freshman and Sopho- 
more years are sufficient in scope and purpose to give 
the needed training in the use of English. The modern 
languages, namely, French and German, are great store- 
houses of the sciences, and consequently courses of study 
in these languages are offered to the student in the earlier 
years of his work to enable him to use these languages in 
the last two years of his study. 

The four lines of science study, namely, Physics, 
Botany, Zoology and Chemistry, which have been begun 
during the first two years, may be carried through the 
Junior and Senior years, thus enabling the student to gain 
considerable facility in any selected science. The work 
of these two years is quite broadly elective, the only re- 
striction within the limits of the courses offered being that 
a minimum of ten hours per week shall be selected from 
the sciences, including, in addition to those just enumerated 
Geologv, Mathematics and Economic Science. The study 
of the sciences is strongly supported by work in literary, 
historical and psychological lines. 

The course of study for young women leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science permits a more extendecr 
study of the languages, and especially of French and 
German. A characteristic feature of the work for young 
women is the study of Domestic Economy. This subject 
is studied throughout the four years. The equipment and 
character of the work done in this direction are carefully 
described under the topic, "Department of Domestic Econ- 
omy." These courses of study in Domestic Economy are 



206 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



open also to young women who may be candidates for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science. 

More detailed statements of the purpose and character 
of the courses of study pursued for the two degrees belong- 
ing to this Division are given under the statements for each 
department. 

SCIENCE. 

ACADEMIC YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 



Algebra, 5. 
English, 5, or 
*Latin, 5, or 
German, 5. 
History, 5. 
Elocution, 2. 
Drawing, 2. 



(Mathematics, I.) 

(English, I.) 

(Latin, I.) 

(Languages, V.) 

(History, I.) 

(Elocution, I.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIX.) 



SECOND TERM. 



Algebra, 5. 
Plane Geometry, 5. 
Elementary Botany, 
Elementary Rhetoric 
* Latin, 5, or 
German, 5. 
History, 4. 



(Mathematics. II or III.) 

(Mathematics, V.) 

I. (Botany, I.) 

5, or (English, II.) 

(Latin, II.) 

(Languages, VI.) 

(History, IIA.) 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



Advanced Algebra, 
Botany, Ecology, 2. 



(Mathematics, IV.) 
(Botany, II.) 



*i,:iiin •.! Lrerman may be taken only by those students who can 
•how to the Professor of Rhetoric satisfactory evidence of I'roiiciency 
in the English of the Academic Vear, 






DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 207 

"Latin, 5, or (Latin, I or III.) 

'♦German, 5, or (Languages, V or VII.) 

Prench, 5. (Languages, I.) 

Physiography, 3. (Geology, I.) 

Advanced Rhetoric, 5. (English, III.) 

domestic Art, 2 (for women). (Domestic Economy, I.) 

Military Drill, 2 (for men). (Military, I.) 

Library Work, 4 hours. (Library, 1.) 
Physical Culture, 1 (for women). 

SECOND TERM. 

Solid Geometry and Plane Trigonometry, 5. 

(Mathematics, VI.) 
♦♦Latin, 5, or (Latin, II or IV.) 

♦♦German, 5, or (Languages, VI or VIII.) 

French, 5. (Languages, II.) 

Histology, 4. (Botany, III.) 

Entomology, 2. (Zoology, I.) 

Elocution, 1. (Elocution, II.) 

Composition, 1. (English, IV.) 

Domestic Science, 2 (for women). (Domestic Economy, II.) 
Military Drill, 2 (for men). (Military, II.) 

Physical Culture, 1 (for women). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

♦Analytical Geometry, 5. (Mathematics, VIII.) 

♦Cryptogamic Botany, 4. (Botany, IV.) 

♦Vertebrate Zoology, 4. (Zoology, II.) 

Latin, 4, or (Latin, V.) 

German, 4, or (Languages, IX.) 

French, 4. (Languages, III.) 

Physics, 5. (Physics, I.) 

Composition, 1. (English, V. 

♦♦Beginning or Advanced Latin or German according to the prepara- 
tion of the student. 

♦The student shall elect two of these studies. The study omitted 
mao be elected in the Junior or Senior year and counted in those years. 



208 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Domestic Science, 2 (for women). (Domestic Economy, III.) 
Military Science, 2 (for men). (Military, III.) 

Physical Culture, 1 (for women). 

SECOND TERM. 



**Calculus, 5, or 

* "Invertebrate Zoology, 4. 

Chemistry, 5. 

Physics, 5. 

Composition, 1. 

Domestic Art, 2 (for women). 

Military Drill, 2 (for men). 

Physical Culture, 1 (for women), 



(Mathematics, IX.) 
(Zoology III.) 
(Chemistry, II.) 
(Physics, IV.) 
(English, VI.) 
(Domestic Economy, IV.) 
(Military, IV.) 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



(Mathematics, X.) 

(Botany, VI.) 

(Botany, X.) 

(Botany, XII.) 

(Chemistry, V.) 

(Economic Science, I.) 

(Elocution, III.) 

(English, VII.) 

(Veterinary Science, XXX.) 

(Literature, I.) 

(Zoology, IV.) 

(Physics, IX.) 

(Zoology, V.) 

•♦Choice between Calculus and Invertebrate Zoology. The study 
omitted may be taken in the Junior or Senior year and counted in those 
years. 

♦In the Junior and Senior years the student is permitted to elect 

from the list Of Subjects for each term the equivalent of not less than 

noj more than twenty bours per week, of these .-it least ten 

houri pel week in each term musl be chosen from the mathematical 

;. al, pal hi al, economic or domesl lc sciences. 

11 BUbjecl may he taken only on the recommendat ion of (he 
Professor in which the student takes the major portion of his work. 



Differential Equations, 3. 

Advanced Crypotogamic Botany, 3 

Economic Botany, 2. 

Vegetable Cytology, 3. 

Chemistry, 5. 

Political Economy, 5. 

Elocution, 2. 

Debating, 1. 

Histology, 2. 

English Literature, 3. 

Entomology, 5. 

***Photography, 2. 

Embryology, 3 to 5. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 



209 



Surveying, 4. 

Physiology, 1. 

Mediaeval History, 5. 

Geology, 5. 

Physical Laboratory, 1 or 2. 

Military Science, 1. 



(Civil Engineering, VIII.) 

(Veterinary Science, XVII.) 

(History, VA.) 

(Geology, II.) 

(Physics, XIV.) 

(Military, V.) 



Physical Culture, 1 (for women). Required. 



SECOND TERM. 



Advanced Mathematics, 6. 


(Mathematics, XI.) 


Animal Parasues, 2. 


(Zooiogy, VIII.) 


Bacteriology, 2. 


(Botany, VII.) 


Systematic Botany, 3. 


(Botany, XV.) 


Organic Chemistry, 5, or 


(Chemistry, IX.) 


Blow-pipe Analysis and Assaying, 5. 




(Chemistry, VII and VIII.) 


Political Economy, 5. (Economic Science, II.) 


Elocution, 2. 


(Elocution, IV.) 


Comparative Anatomy, 5. 


(Zoology, VII.) 


Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5. 


(Zoology, IX.) 


Debating, 1. 


(English, VIII.) 


English Literature, 5. 


(Literature, II.) 


Mineralogy, 4. 


(Geology, VI.) 


Physical Laboratory, 1 or 2. 


(Physics, XV.) 


Military Science, 1. 


(Military, VI.) 


Public Speaking, 1, required. 


(Elocution, VIII.) 


Modern History, 5. 


(History, VIA.) 


Physical Culture, 1 (for women). Required. 


SENIOR YEAR. 




FIRST TERM. 




Anatomy of Domestic Animals, 3. 





(Veterinary Science, XXXI.) 
Political Economy, 3. (Economic Science, III.) 

Mineralogy, 4. (Geology, VI.) 

History, Development of the United States, 5. 

(History, IIIA.) 



210 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Fiction, 3. 

Electro-Cheraistry, 3. 
Organic Chemistry, 5. 
Chemistry of the Household. 
Psychology, 5. 
Agrostology, 2. 
Vegetable Pathology, 3 or 5. 
Advanced Cryptogamic Botany, 
Chemistry, <- 
Elocution, 2. 

Physical Laboratory, 1 or 2. 
Morphology, 3 to 5. 
Neurology, 3 to 5. 
Evolution of Plants, 1. 
Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5. 
Military Science, 1. 
One oration, required. 
Botanical Seminar, 1. 



(Literature, III.) 

(Chemistry, XVIII.) 

(Chemistry, XIV). 

(Chemistry, XVI.) 

(Philosophy, I.) 

(Botany, XIII.) 

(Botany, V.) 

I. (Botany, VI.) 

(Chemistry, XI or XVII.) 

(Elocution, V.) 

(Physics, XIV.) 

(Zoology, X.) 

(Zoology, XI.) 

(Botany, XIX.) 

(Zoology, IX.) 

(Military, VII.) 

(Elocution, IX.) 

(Botany, XVIII.) 



SECOND TERM. 



Evolution of Animals, 1. 
Astronomy, 5. 
Geology, 5. 

History of Civilization, 5. 
American Literature, 3. 
Vegetable Physiology, 2 or 5. 
Advanced Bacteriology, 3. 
Ethics, 3. 
Elocution, 1. 
Chemistry, 3, or 
Chemistry. 3. 
Chemistry, 3. 
Evolution of Plants, 1. 
Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5. 
F'hysical Laboratory, 1 or 2. 
Evolution of Cultivated Plants. I. 
Morphology, 3 to 5. 



(Zoology, VI.) 

(Physics, VII.) 

(Geology, IV.) 

(History, IVA.) 

(Literature, I.) 

(Botany, XI.) 

(Botany, VIII.) 

(Philosophy, II.) 

(Elocution, VI.) 

(Chemistry, XIII.) 

(Chemistry, XV.) 

(Chemistry, XIX.) 

(Botany, XIX.) 

(Zoology, IX.) 

(Physics, XV.) 

(Horticulture, VI.) 

(Zoology, X.) 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 



211 



Military Science, 1. 
Botanical Seminar. 
Thesis, required, 1. 



(Military, VIII.) 
(Botany, XVIII.) 



GENERAL AND DOMESTIC SCIENCE. 

(For Women Only.) 
ACADEMIC YEAR. 



Algebra, 5. 
English, 5, or 
♦Latin, 5, or 
♦German, 5. 
History, 5. 
Liocution, 2. 
Drawing, 2. 



FIRST TERM. 

(Mathematics, I.) 

(English, I.) 

(Latin, I.) 

(Languages, V.) 

(History, 1.) 

(Elocution, I.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIX.) 



SECOND TERM. 



Algebra, 5. 

Plane Geometry, 5. 

Elementary Botany, 2. 

Elementary Rhetoric, 5, or 

♦Latin, 5, or 

♦German, 5. 

History, 4. 



(Mathematics, II or III.) 

(Mathematics, V.) 

(Botany, I.) 

(English, II.) 

(Latin, II.) 

(Languages, VI.) 

(History, IIA.) 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



Advanced Algebra, 2. 
♦♦Latin, 5, or 
German, 5, or 
French. 5. 
Domestic Art, 2. 



(Mathematics, XIV.) 

(Latin, I or III.) 

(Languages, V or VII.) 

(Languages, I.) 

(Domestic Economy, I.) 



*Latin or German may be taken only by those students who can 
show to the^Professor of Rhetoric satisfactory evidence of proficiency in 
the English of the Academic year. 

♦♦Beginning or Advanced Latin or German according to the prepara- 
tion of the student. 



212 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Chemistry, 4. 

(Chemistry, III or Agricultural Chemistry, XXIII.) 
Advanced Rhetoric, 5. (English, III.) 

Physical Culture, I. 

SECOND TERM. 

Solid Geometry and Trigonometry, 5. (Mathematics, VI.) 

Latin, 5, or (Latin, II or IV.) 

German, 5, or (Languages, VI or VII I.) 

French, 5. (Languages, II.) 

Domestic Science, 2. (Domestic Economy, II.) 
Chemistry, 4. 

(Chemistry, VI, or Agricultural Chemistry, XXIV.) 

Elocution, 1. (Elocution, II.) 

Composition, 1. (English, IV.) 
Physical Culture, 1. 

Students wishing to elect Advanced Chemistry or Advanced Mathe- 
matics may do so, leaving Physics and Botany as required studies in the 
Junior Year. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Latin, 4, or (Latin, V.) 

German, 4, or (Languages, VII or IX.) 

French, 4. (Languages, III.) 

Domestic Science, 2. (Domestic Economy, III.) 

Physics, 3 or 4. (Physics, I.) 

Physiology and Hygiene, 3. (Physiology, I.) 

Ecology, 2. (Botany, II.) 

Elocution, 2. (Elocution, VII.) 

Composition, 1. (English, V.) 
Physical Culture, 1. 

SECOND TKRM. 

Latin, 4, or (Latin, VI.) 

German, 4, or (Languages, VIII.) 

French, 4. (Languages, IV.) 

Domestic Art, 2. (Domestic Economy, IV.) 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 



213 



Physics, 3 or 4. (Physics, II.) 

Physiology and Hygiene, 3. (Physiology, II.) 

Histology, 4. (Botany, III.) 

Composition, 1. (English, VI.) 
Physical Culture, 1. 

Students wishing to elect Advanced Chemistry or Advanced 
Mathematics in the Sophomore Year, may do so, leaving Physics and 
Botany as required studies in the Junior Year. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



(Required.) 

♦Mediaeval History, 5, 
English Literature, 3. 
Bacteriology, 2. 
Domestic Science, 2. 
Physical Culture, 1. 



or (History, VA.) 

(Literature, I.) 

(Botany, VII.) 

(Domestic Economy, VA.) 



(Electives.) 






Physiography, 3. 
Vertebrate Zoology, 4. 
Floriculture, 2. 
Cryptogamic Botany, 4. 
Economic Botany, 2. 
Chemistry, 3 or 5. 

(Chemistry, V, or 
Advanced Physiology, 3 to 5. 
Analytical Geometry, 5. 
Differential Equations, 3. 
Political Economy, 5. 
Elocution, 2. 
♦♦French, 5, or 
German, 5. 



(Geology, I.) 

(Zoology, II.) 

(Horticulture, XI.) 

(Botany, IV.) 

(Botany, X.) 

Agricultural Chemistry, XXV.) 

(Physiology, III.) 

(Mathematics, VIII.) 

(Mathematics, X.) 

(Economic Science, I.) 

(Elocution, III.) 

(Languages, I.) 

(Languages, V.) 



♦Literature and Mediaeval and Modern History are required for 
one year and may be taken either in the Junior or Senior year. 

♦♦Beginning French and German elective for those students who 
did not elect Modern Languages in the Academic or Freshman year. 



214 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



SECOND TEBM. 



(Required.) 



*Modern History, 5, or 
English Literature, 5. 
Public Speaking, 1. 
Domestic Art, 2. 
Physical Culture, 1. 



(History, VIA.) 

(Literature, II.) 

(Elocution, VIII.) 

(Domestic Economy, VIA.) 



(Electives.) 

Invertebrate Zoology, 4. 
Entomology, 2. 
Horticulture, 3. 
Olericulture, 2. 
Ferns, 3. 
Organic Chemistry, 5. 

(Chemistry, IX, or Agricultural Chemistry 



(Zoology, III.) 

(Zoology, I.) 

(Horticulture, I.) 

(Horticulture, V.) 

(Botany, XVII.) 



XXVI.) 



Advanced Physiology, 3 to 
Physical Laboratory, 1 or 2. 
Advanced Mathematics, 3. 
Calculus, 5. 
Political Economy, 5. 
Debating, 1. 
Elocution, 2. 
**Prench, 5, or 
German, 5. 



(Physiology, IV.) 

(Physics, XIV.) 

(Mathematics, XL) 

(Mathematics, IX.) 

(Economic Science, II.) 

(English, VIII.) 

(Elocution, IV.) 

(Languages, II.) 

(Languages, VI.) 



Wood Carving, 1. 



(Mechanical Engineering, XLII.) 



SENIOR YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 

(Required.) 

♦Mediaeval History, 5. 
English Literature, 3. 

•Literature and Medieval and Modern History are required for 
one year and may be taken either in the Junior or Senior year. 

**Hetfinnintf French and German elective for those students who 
did not elect Modern Lan^ua^es In the Academic or Freshman year. 



(History, VA.) 
(Literature, I.) 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 



215 



History of Art 
Oration, 1. 
Domestic Art, 2. 



2. 



(Domestic Economy, XI.) 

(Elocution, IX.) 

(Domestic Economy, VIIA.) 



(Electives.) 
Geology, 5. 
Entomology, 5. 
Embryology, 3 to 5. 
Advanced Cryptogamic Botany, 3. 
Agrostology, 2. 
Vegetable Pathology, 2 or 5. 
Botanical Seminar, 1. 
Chemistry of the Household, 1. 
Dairying, 3. 

Political Economy, 3. ( 

History, Development of the United 

Fiction, 3. 

Elocution, 2. 

French, 4, or 

German, 4. 

Landscape Gardening, 2. 



(Geology, II.) 

(Zoology, IV.) 

(Zoology, V.) 

(Botany, VI.) 

(Botany, XIII.) 

(Botany, V.) 

(Botany, XVIII.) 

(Chemistry, XVI.) 

(Dairying, XII.) 

Economic Science, III.) 

States, 5. 

(History, IIIA.) 

(Literature, III.) 

(Elocution, V.) 

(Languages, III.) 

(Languages, VII.) 

(Horticulture, VIII.) 



SECOND TERM, 



(Required.) 
♦Modern History, 5, or 
English Literature, 5. 
Home Decoration, 2. 
Thesis, 1. 
Domestic Science, 2. 

(Electives.) 
Geology, 5. 

Advanced Entomology, 3 
Evolution of Animals, 1. 
Evolution of Plants, 1. 
Vegetable Physiology, 2. 
Advanced Bacteriology, 3 



to 5. 



(History, VIA.) 

(Literature, II.) 

(Domestic Economy, XII.) 

(Domestic Economy, VIIIA.) 

(Geology, IV.) 
(Zoology, IX.) 
(Zoology, VI.) 

(Botany, XIX.) 
(Botany, XI.) 

(Botany, VIII.) 



♦Literature and Mediaeval and Modern History are required for one 
year, and may be taken in either Junior or Senior "year. 



216 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Botanical Seminar, 1. 
Ethics, 3. 

History of Civilization, 
American Literature, 3 
Elocution, 1. 
French, 4, or 
German, 4. 
Wood Carving, 1. 



(Botany, XIX.) 

(Philosophy, II.) 

5. (History, IVA.) 

(Literature, IV.) 

(Elocution, VI.) 

(Languages, IV.) 

(Languages, VIII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XLII.) 

In the Junior and Senior years a student is permitted 

to take each term not less than 16 nor more than 20 hours 

per week. 



TWO YEARS COURSE IN DOMESTIC SCIENCE. 
FIRST YEAR. 

FIRST TEEM. 

Chemistry, 4. 

(Chemistry, III, or Agricultural Chemistry, XXIII.) 

Physics, 3. (Physics, I.) 

Ecology, 2. (Botany, II.) 

English, 5. (English, III.) 

History of Art, 2. (Domestic Economy, XI.) 

Domestic Science, 2 . (Domestic Economy, II.) 

Domestic Art, 2. (Domestic Economy, I.) 

SECOND TERM. 



Chemistry, 4. 

(Chemistry, VI, or Agricultural Chemistry, XXIV.) 



Physics, 3. 
Histology, 4. 
Entomology, 2. 
Compositio *, 1. 
History of Art, 2. 
Domestic Science, 2. 
Domestic Art, 2. 



(Physics, II.) 

(Botany, III.) 

(Zoology, I.) 

(English, IV.) 

(Domestic Economy, XII.) 

(Domestic Economy, III.) 

(Domestic Economy, IV.) 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 217 

SECOND *EAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Chemistry, 3. 

(Chemistry, V, or Agricultural Chemistry, XXV.) 

Physiology and Hygiene, 3. (Physiology, I) 

Vertebrate Zoology, 4. (Zoology, II.) 

Bacteriology, 2. (Botany, VII.) 

Educational Psychology, 3. (Philosophy, III.) 

Domestic Science, 2. (Domestic Economy, V.) 

Domestic Art, 2. (Domestic Economy, VI.) 

Domestic Economy, 2. (Domestic Economy, IX.) 

SECOND TERM. 

Chemistry, 5. 

(Chemistry, IX, or Agricultural Chemistry, XXVI.) 

Physiology and Hygiene, 3. (Physiology, II.) 

Invertebrate Zoology, 4. (Zoology, III.) 

Educational Psychology, 3. (Philosophy, III.) 

Domesnc Science, 2. (Domestic Economy, VIII.) 

Domestic Art, 2. (Domestic Economy, VII.) 

Domestic Economy, 2. (Domestic Economy, X.) 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS. 

EDGAR WILLIAM STANTON, PROFESSOR. 
MISS ROBERTS, MR* PATTENGILL, MISS COLPITTS, ASSISTANTS. 

The work of the Department of Mathematics is di- 
rected to the following ends: 

(1) The Development of Intellectual Strength. — Such 
a degree of thoroughness is required as awakens interest 
and stimulates to earnest effort. The work is so arranged 
as to compel the student to abandon the mere mechanical 
methods of reaching results. He can make little or no 
progress except through the mastery of principles and 
methods; and in their application there is demanded of 
him a high degree of ingenuity, care and courage. He is 



218 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

subjected to the continuous discipline of holding details in 
mind, comparing facts, drawing conclusions and advancing 
to the discovery of new truth. He learns to think, judge, 
originate, and through his mathmatical training gains 
mental strength. 

(2) Accuracy in Presentation of Mathematical Truths. 
— The student is required not only to think clearly, but to 
put his thought into concise and precise English. In the 
explanation of examples he is asked to bring out and em- 
phasize the principles involved, dealing in detail with such 
equations only as are necessary to this purpose. In the 
solution of problems an analysis of statement and equa- 
tion must be given, definitions and theorems must be stated 
clearly and accurately and in the demonstration of proposi- 
tions the use of correct language is considered as second- 
ary only to the employment of correct logic. 

(3) The acquirement of such Command of the Subject 
Matter of Mathematics as will make it a Valuable Instru- 
ment in Higher Scientific and Technical Study. — To this 
end an effort is made to eradicate from the student's mind 
the idea entertained by many, that mathematical truths are 
learned simply to be forgotten, and to awaken in its place 
an earnest desire to obtain a comprehensive and abiding 
knowledge of the essential facts of the science. Thorough- 
ness in daily recita^on is demanded, frequent reviews are 
given and final credits are made to depend largely upon 
the student's grasp of principles and the readiness and 
accuracy with which he performs the simple and the 
complex operations involved in their application. Each 
branch as it is taken up is so presented as to require the 
constant employment of the principles and facts of the 
preceding mathematical studies. The Department aims in 
this way to give the student such a degree of mathematical 
maturity and self-reliant mastery as will enable him to 
use nil mathematical knowledge with profit either in 
advanced collegiate work or as an instructor in our high 

: choolfl and academies. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 219 

In the Engineering Courses, Algebra, Geometry, Trigo- 
nometry, Analytical Geometry and Calculus are required 
studies; in the other four courses, Algebra, Geometry and 
Trigonometry are required, while the advanced mathemati- 
ccal work is either optional or elective. 

The following are the several courses in Mathematics: 

Course I. — Algebra to Involution. — It is expected that 
students entering this course will have such a knowledge of 
elementary algebra to simple equations as may be obtained 
by thorough work in the high school. If the student's 
preparation is in excess of this requirement it will be 
greatly to his advantage. 

The subjects included in the review and advance work 
of this course are those which generally precede involution 
in any standard text. They are treated, however, in an 
exhaustive manner and the examples and problems given 
are more difficult than those found in the ordinary text- 
book. Special stress is laid upon the statement of defini- 
tions and the demonstration of principles. 

Course II. — From Involution to Ratio and Proportion. 
—This course is open to those who have completed Course 
I. The following subjects are studied: Involution of Mo- 
nomials and Polynomials; Evolution, including the consid- 
eration of the higher roots of polynomials, and rules for 
determining the roots of numbers based upon the algebraic 
method of extracting roots; Radicals, including the funda- 
mental operations, involution, evolution, rationalization, 
imaginary quantities, extracting the square root of bino- 
mial surds and the solution of equations involving radicals; 
Pure and A-ec-ted quadratics; Equations solved like quad- 
ratics; and Simultaneous Quardratic Equations. Frequent 
written reviews are given covering work in this Course 
and Course I. 

At the completion of this course students are expected 
to have such grasp of algebra through quadratics as will 
enable them to handle its principles up to this point with- 



220 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

out error and to perform the operations required, with 
rapidity and accuracy. 

Course III. — Algebra to Ratio and Proportion. — This 
Course covers practically the same subjects as those 
enumerated in Courses I and II. Much of the work, how- 
ever, is taken in rapid review, only one term being devoted 
to the combined courses. The object aimed at is not ele- 
mentary instruction in the science, but a wider grasp of 
principles and familiarity with their application in more 
difficult fields. Many of the examples assigned are such 
as are met with in the higher mathematics. The student 
is thus introduced to a quality of work demanding a broad 
view of principles and methods and a marked degree of 
skill in algebraic manipulation. 

This course should be undertaken by those only who 
have already had large experience in algebraic work and 
who have developed considerable strength in this study. 
The minimum requirement for entrance is a thorough 
knowledge of algebra through simple equations. The 
Course is especially intended, however, for students who 
have completed algebra in the high school and who need 
to give the work a thorough review before entering upon 
advanced work. Admission is secured by examination or 
upon the certificate of the proper officer of an accredited 
high school. 

Course IV. — Advanced Algebra Completed. — The sub- 
jects treated in this Course are ratio, proportion, varia- 
tion, arithmetic progression, geometrical progression, 
harmonioal progression, the binomial theorem, conver- 
gency and divergency of series, theorem of undetermined 
coefficients including partial fractions and reversion of 
series, principles and use of logarithms, permutations and 
combinations, probability and the the theory of equations. 

The Course is open to students of the College who 
have taken Courses I and TT or Course III; also to gradu- 
ates of the fully accredited high schools who furnish the 
proper certificates. The first ten days of the time alloted 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 221 

to the course is devoted to a review of algebra up to and 
including quadratics. Students who fail to stand the test 
of this review will be assigned to such work as they are 
prepared to undertake. 

Graduates of accredited schools are earnestly urged to 
carefully review their work in algebra before enter- 
ing this course. The sample questions printed else- 
where in this catalogue give a good idea of the knowledge 
of the subject needed. The Department will gladly unite 
with the student and his school principal in arranging to 
test the thoroughness of his home review; such test can be 
given in connection with the work of the high school and, 
if satisfactory to the Department, will be accepted in lieu 
of the review test at the College. The student can then 
begin his advanced work without delay. Students design- 
ing to take the review here must be present promptly at the 
opening of the term. Correspondence regarding this whole 
matter is cordially invited. 

Students not graduates of the fully accredited schools 
will be admitted to this course upon passing a satisfactory 
examination upon the work covered by Course III. As 
stated under "Requirements for Admission" arrangements 
can be made with the principals of high schools or county 
superintendents to conduct such examinations. The prin- 
cipal of any school desiring to test the ability of his 
students to enter upon the work of this course will be 
furnished, upon request, a list of examination questions. 
The Department will be pleased to mark the examination 
papers and enter upon its records as accredited students 
in the Mathematical Department the names of all students 
who show that they are prepared to take up the work with 
success. 

Course V. — Plane Geometry. — The topics included in 
this course are those usually treated in a standard text. 
They include the fundamental definitions and axioms, 
theorems relating to rectilinear figures and the circle, meas- 
urement of angles; doctrine of limits; theory of proportion; 



222 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

similar polygons; comparison and measurement of the sur- 
faces of rectilinear figures; measurement of the circle, and 
geometrical construction of plane figures. The text book used 
is Phillips and Fisher. The proofs outlined in the text must 
be fully amplified; definitions must be stated with precision; 
authority cited must be given in full and the logical steps in 
demonstration must be so arranged and presented as to 
constitute a complete and rigid proof. The student must 
understand each proposition and be able to state the demon- 
stration in concise geometric language. Special emphasis 
will be laid upon the demonstration of original exercises. 
The course is open to those who furnish the head of the 
department with satisfactory evidence that they have a 
thorough knowledge of the subjects in Course I. 

Course VI. — (a) Solid and Spherical Geometry. — This 
course is open to those who have met the requirements for 
admission to the mathematics of the Freshman Year. A 
week is given at the beginning to a review of plane geome- 
try, one day being devoted to each book. Students are re- 
quired to write out or demonstrate orally such propositions 
as may be assigned, using in preparation the text book 
studied in the preparatory school. Looking forward to this 
work the students immediately before leaving home should 
carefully go over the whole subject of plane geometry. 
Those who show in the week's review a satisfactory knowl- 
edge of definitions and ability to handle successfully ad- 
vanced geometric work will be assigned to the classes in 
solid geometry. The subects considered in the remainder 
of the course will be the properties of planes, of diedral and 
and polyedral angles, of prisms, of pyramids and other poly- 
edrons, of cylinders, cones and spheres, of spherical trian- 
gles and spherical polygons. 

(b) Plane Trigonometry. — Algebra and geometry are 
essential preliminary studies. The subects investigated 
are definitions; positive and negative angles; circular meas- 
ures of angles; operations upon angles; functions of angles, 
their relations and varying values; determination of values 
of the functions of particular angles; functions of different 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 223 

angles expressed in terms of those of a basal angle; deriv- 
ation and reduction of trigonometric formulas; solution of 
right and oblique triangles. The points most strongly em- 
phasized are: Care in tracing the trigonometric functions 
of varying angles in the different quadrants, readiness and 
skill in the derivation and reduction of trigonometric for- 
mulas, and accuracy in the use of logarithmic tables. 

Course VII. — Spherical Trigonometry. — This work is 
required in the second term, Junior year, of the Civil Engin- 
eering course. It is elective to students in the science and 
ladies' courses. Course VI and the studies necessarily pre- 
liminary thereto are required for entrance. The spherical 
right triangle is investigated; triangles of reference are 
formed and formulas deduced therefrom; Napier's rules are 
explained; the six different cases arising in the solution of 
right triangles are discussed and illustrated by numerous 
examples. Spherical triangles in general are considered; 
the formulas relating thereto are derived and applied to the 
solution of examples; interesting problems connected with 
the celestial spheres are included in the course. 

Course VIII. — Plane Analytic Geometry. — This subject 
is taught largely from the standpoint of its value as a disci- 
plinary study. Once the student is impressed with the 
spirit of its method, the beauty of its logic and the excellent 
field for anlytical reasoning it opens up, he will readily find 
his way to a mastery of the particular facts it reveals. The 
student is introduced to the subject through a review of the 
special algebraic, trignometric and geometric conceptions 
upon which It is based; these are applied to the analytic rep- 
resentation of points in a plane and the proposition estab- 
lished that all geometric lines and curves can be represented 
by equations and their properties and relations discovered 
by a study of these equations. The line, the circle and the 
conic sections are in this way most carefully investigated. 
Examples involving principles are solved and from a knowl- 
edge of particulars the student is led to the demonstration 
of general theorems. The generalized truth is then em- 
ployed in the development of other truth, and thus the 



224 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

student is given a most excellent drill in both inductive and 
deductive reasoning. At the same time his needs, as an en- 
gineering or scientific student, of a knowledge of the facts 
of analytic geometry, are fully met. The Analytic Geome- 
try by Tanner and Allen of Cornell University is used as a 
text. 

Course IX. — Differential and Integral Calculus. — All 
preceeding mathematical work should be completed before 
this course is undertaken. Calculus bears to that work the 
double relation that, while it is based upon it and cannot 
be pursued successfully except as the work has been well 
mastered, it on the other hand furnishes a most excellent op- 
portunity for a general review of the preceding mathemati- 
cal studies and gives to all that has gone before a signifi- 
cance and value which it would otherwise lack. It is there- 
fore a most important part of any extended and thorough 
mathematical course. The abstruse principles of this higher 
method of mathematical investigation are explained upon 
the theory of limits. The theory of infinitessimals is also 
employed. Instruction is given by daily recitations with a 
review of the week's work each Friday. In differential cal- 
culus the rules of differentiation, expansion of functions, in- 
determinate forms, tangents, normals and asymptotes, direc- 
tion of curvature, points of inflection, radius of curva- 
ture, order of contact, the osculating circle, singular points 
and maxima and minima of functions are studied. In inte- 
gral calculus much time is spent in acquiring a usable 
knowledge of the forms of integration. Application of 
integration is then made to the determination of the lengths 
of plane curves, areas of plane surfaces and surfaces of rev- 
olution, volumes of solids of revolution and other solids. 

Course X. — Differential liquations. — This course is re- 
quired of electrical engineers and is open to all students 
of the College who have completed Course IX. The work 
covered by it may be considered as supplementary to inte- 
gral calculus. The subjects treated are the formation of 
differential equations; solutions of equations of the first or- 
der with applications to geometry, mechanics and physics; 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 225 

methods of handling linear equations with constant and var- 
iable coefficients; exact differential equations; integration 
in series; equations of the second order with geometrical, 
mechanical and physical applications; ordinary differential 
equations with more than two variables; partial differential 
equations of the different orders. The text used is Mur- 
ray's "Differential Equations." 

Course XL— This course deals with the application of 
differential calculus to the discussion of the properties of 
curves. It treats also of the analytic methods of repre- 
senting a point in space, the relation of different points, 
transferring the reference from one set of axes to another, 
locus of equations of two and three variables, surfaces of 
revolution, planes, straight lines and quadratic surfaces. 
The principles involved are illustrated by numerous exam- 
ples. 

Course XII. — Algebra through Quadratics. — Given first 
term, Freshman year. This course, which is designed es- 
pecially for students in agriculture, covers the work in 
Course III. To complete it successfully in the time allowed 
the student should have knowledge of at least the funda- 
mental operations. It will be greatly to his advantage if 
he has taken the work as far as involution. 

Course XIII. — Algebra; Permutations and Combina- 
8, Binomial Theorem and Logarithms; Plane Geometry. 
—Given second term, Freshman year, agricultural course. 
Six weeks are devoted to algebra and the remainder of the 
term to plane geometry. The work in algebra includes per- 
mutations and combinations; the binomial and logarithms. 
The geometry covers the same ground as Course V. 

Course XIV. — Algebra. — Given first term, Freshman 
. General and Domestic Science Course, two reci- 
ations per week. The requirements for admission 
o this course are the same as for Course IV. Students from 
iccredited schools will be given a short review through 
luadratics at the beginning of the term. Their permanent 
issignment will be determined by the character of their 
ork in this review. Attention is called to the sample 



226 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

questions in algebra appearing in this catalogue, under the 
head of "Entrance requirements in mathematics;" students 
are also urged to read with care the remarks upon Course 
IV. 

The subjects treated in the course are ratio, proportion 
variation, arithmetical and geometrical progression, permu 
tations and combinations, the binomial theorem, undeter 
mined coefficients, logarithms and the theory of equations 
Students mastering the work thus outlined will be able t( 
take the advanced mathematics offered in the course in Gen 
eral and Domestic Science. 

Special arrangement of Mathematical Work for Agricuttl 
tural Course— Students who have had considerable experi 
ence in algebra and Who enter the Agricultural Course ii 
the spring can begin their mathematical studies at once an 
pursue them in regular order until they are completec" 
taking the work as follows: 

Spring term: Course III. 

Fall term: A special class will be formed which wi 
complete the work in algebra and take plane geometry. 

Second spring term: Course VI. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS. 

Lotus Bevieb Spinney, Professor. 

Mit. Tuttle, Instructor. 

With the opening of the college year 1902-3 this depai 
ment will be located in the new Engineering Hall. 
these quarters it will occupy sixteen commodious rooms, i 
eluding six Laboratories, two standardizing and testii 
rooms, two research rooms, two apparatus rooms, three < 
flees and ;i large lecture room. 

The lecture room is modern in its equipment, which i 
eludes a convenient system of darkening shutters for t 
windows and a, large permanent lantern screen, to facilits 
demonstration work. At the lecture room table are electi 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 227 

gas and water connections, placing at the disposal of the 
lecturer a water pressure of fifty pounds per square inch and 
electric currents from storage batteries, and direct or alter- 
nating current dynamos. 

The department has a good equipment in apparatus for 
demonstration purposes, which is stored in apparatus rooms 
adjoining the lecture room. 

The general laboratory rooms are large and well lighted 
and are equipped with heavy oak tables and stone piers for 
the support of the laboratory apparatus. Convenient elec- 
tric, gas and water connections are provided. A very ser- 
viceable equipment in the apparatus used in general phys- 
ical laboratory work is furnished. Among other apparatus 
may be mentioned, a laboratory clock, with electric con- 
nections, a chronograph, a reversion pendulum, two torsion 
pendulums for the experimental determination of "moment 
of inertia" and the "coefficient of simple rigidity," a physi- 
cal pendulum, apparatus for the determination of the "in- 
tensity of gravity" by observations on a body rolling on an 
inclined plane, analytical balances, Jolly's balance, hydro- 
static balance, apparatus for the determination of "Young's 
Modulus" by stretching and by bending, apparatus for the 
coefficient of linear expansion, a cathetometer, an optical 
bench, telescopes and microscopes, spectroscopes, a sacchari- 
raeter, hydrometers, thermometers, barometers, galvanome- 
ters, Wheatstone bridges, "testing apparatus," electro-calori- 
meters, silver, copper and water voltameters, etc. 

The photometry rooms are equipped with several pho- 
tometer benches and are furnished with gas and electric 
■onnections. The arrangement of apparatus is made with a 
new of facilitating the regulation tests of arc and incandes- 
nt lamps as well as those of other sources of illumination. 

The dynamo room is equipped with experimental dyna- 
nos, including arc machines and direct and alternating 
urrent machinery of various types together with a conven- 
>nt switch-board and extended system of electric connec- 



228 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

tions. An equipment in ammeters, voltmeters, wattmeters, 
transformers, dynamometers, etc., is also provided. 

The repair shop is fitted with two foot lathes, a set of 
machinist's and carpenter's tools and a stock of shop sup- 
plies. This room is used for the repair and manufacture of 
apparatus. 

The photographic laboratory is equipped with cameras 
and other appliances, dark rooms, skylights, screens and 
back grounds for portrait and copying work, and water facil- 
ities. The equipment enables the carrying forward of a 
very practical course in photography in its various applica- 
tions.* 

The following courses are offered by the department: 

Course I. — Mechanics and Light and Sound. — First 
term, and 

Course IT. — Heal, and Electricity and Magnetism.— 
Second Term. Two lectures, one recitation and one labor- 
atory per week. Mathematics IV, V and VI required. 

In the first term of this course the study of mass, force, 
energy, and power is emphasized and special attention is 
given to the graphic methods of solving problems in force- 
actions, velocities, etc. A portion of this term is also given 
over to the discussion of radiation in general and wave mo- 
tion. The other general topics are then taken up according 
to the outline given abov^. 

The laboratory work is kept parallel to the text-book 
and Lecture work and enables the emphasizing and fixing of 
the fundamental conceptions. 

This course is designed to meet the needs of students 
in the <oms' in domestic science. The breadth of the course 
together with the emphasis which is placed upon the essen- 
tials, adapt it to the needs of teachers and others who de- 
sire a genera] training in physics. Professor Spinney and 

Mr 'I Uttle. 

Course 111. Mechanics and TAghi and Sound, Firs1 
term, and 






• DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 229 

Course IV. — Heat and Electricity and Magnetism. — 
Second term. Two lectures and three recitations per week. 
Mathematics IV, V and VI required. 

This course is designed for engineering and general sci- 
ence students, although it is open to others who are proper- 
ly prepared for the work. As in Course I, much stress is 
placed upon the fundamental principles of the work and in 
addition thereto a more thorough study of vector quantities 
and their graphical treatment is made. 

A view of the subject from a mathematical standpoint 
is emphasized and the student is urged to familiarize him- 
self with the theoretical side of the question, as it is believed 
such a foundation is very helpful if not absolutely essential 
to the work which follows. Text-book, Hastings and Beach, 
"General Physics." Professor Spinney and Mr. Tuttle. 

Course V. — Elementary Work in Mechanics and Heat. 
—For students in Agriculture. Three hours per week. First 
term. 

In Mechanics and Heat special attention is given to 
force action and the expenditure of energy. Energy trans- 
formation, heats of fusion and vaporization and specific 
heats are emphasized, keeping in view the bearing of the 
various principles upon practical agriculture. Professor 
Spinney and Mr. Tuttle. 

Course VI. — Electricity and Magnetism.— Three, hours 
per week. First Term. Physics III and IV and Mathema- 
tics IX required. 

Lectures, recitations and problem work. A course in 
the elementary theory of electricity and magnetism. Discus- 
sion of measuring instruments and laboratory methods of 
measuring the various electrical quantities. Text-book, 
Nichols and Franklin, "Elements of Physics," Vol. II. Pro- 
fessor Lanphear. 

Course IX. — Theory and Practice of Photography. — 
One lecture and one afternoon per week. First Term. Open 
to upper classmen only, upon recommendation by the head 
of the department in which the student takes his major 
vork. 



230 



JOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



In the lecture work is given a discussion of the optics 
and chemistry of photography. The manipulation of the 
negative and positive under the various processes to which 
it is subjected is also presented and the laboratory work is 
planned to give the student some skill in carrying forward 
the various methods of practical photography. The student 
is given practice in developing over and under exposed neg- 
atives, in copying and enlarging work, etc. 

The lecture work on the chemistry of the various oper- 
ations is based largely upon Meldola s "Chemistry of Pho- 
tography." Professor Lanphear. 

Course X. — Dynamo Electric Machinery. — Four hours 
per week. Second Term. Prerequisite: Physics VI. Pro- 
fessor Lanphear. 

Course XI. — Alternating Currents. — Four hours per 
week. First Term. Physics X required. Professor Spin- 
ney. 

Course XII. — Applied Electricity. — Four lectures per 
week. Second Term. Physics XI required. Professor Spin- 
ney. 

Course XIV. — General Physical Laboratory. — Two af- 
ternoons per week. First Term. 

Measurement of length, mass and time, determination 
of physical constants, use of the barometer, thermometry, 
calorimetry, etc. Professor Spinney and Mr. Tuttle. 

Course XV. — Physical Laboratory, Elementary Electri- 
cal Measurements. — One afternoon per week, second term, 
or 

Course XVI.— Two afternoons per week, first term, or 

Course XVII.— Two afternoons per week, second term. 

The measurement of the electro-motive force and in- 
ternal resistance of primary and secondary batteries, the 
use of Wheatstone's bridge, measurement of current, de- 
termination of galvanometer constants, high resistance 
measurements and Insulation tests, etc. Professor Spinney 
and Mr. Tuttle. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 231 

Course XVIII. — Physical Laboratory, Electrical Test- 
ing. — Two afternoons per week. First term, or 

Couese XIX.— Two afternoons per week. Second 
Term. Professor Spinney and Mr. Tuttle. 

Course XX. — Physical Laboratory. — Dynamo, motor 
and commercial plant testing. Three afternoons per week. 
First term. Professor Lanphear. 

Course XXI. — Physical Laboratory. — Laboratory study 
of alternating currents, two afternoons per week. Second 
term, Senior year. Professor Lanphear. 

Course XXII. — Electric Circuits. — Two lectures per 
week. Second term. Physics VI required. Professor Lan- 
phear. 

Course XXIII. — Electrical Designing. — Batteries, com- 
mercial ammeters, voltmeters, wattmeters, etc. One after- 
noon per week, second term, Junior year and 

Course XXIV. — Electrical Designing. — One afternoon 
per week. First term, Senior year. The design of dyna- 
mos, motors, transformers, etc. Professor Lanphear. 

Course XXV. — Electrical Designing. — Three afternoons 
per week. Second term, Senior year. Continuation of 
Course XXIV. Professor Lanphear. 

Course XXV. — Electrical Designing. — The design of dy- 
namos, motors, transformers, etc. Three afternoons per 
week. Second term, Senior year. Professor Lanphear. 

Course XXVI.— Thesis in Electrical Engineering be- 
gun, and 

Course XXVII.— Thesis in Electrical Engineering, fin- 
ished. Total equivalent of four hours per week for one 
term. 

Course XXVIII.— Thesis in Physics. 

For a discussion of Courses X to XIII, XVIII to XXVII 
and XXIX and XXX, see the Course in Electrical Engineer- 
ing. 

The department offers thesis work in general physics, in 
heat, in light and sound and in electricity and magnetism 
to students in other than the engineering courses. 



232 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Courses III and IV and Courses X to XXV are designed 
especially for engineering students. Courses III. IV, XIV, 

XV, XVI and XVII are, however, open to other students as 
electives. 

A fee of $5.00 per term is charged for Courses XIV, 

XVI, XVII, XVIII, XIX, XX and XXI. For Course XV the 
fee is $3.00. 

If the student elects but one hour the fee is $3.00. 
The fee for Course IX is $3.00. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY. 

ALFRED ALLEN BENNETT, PROFESSOR. 
MISS PLACEWAY AND MISS EDGETT, ASSISTANTS. 

The study of Chemistry begins in the Sophomore year 
with all students except those in -ne Veterinary Depart- 
ment, who begin their work the First term of the first year. 

METHODS AND OBJECT OF INSTRUCTION. 

The aim of the instruction in Chemistry is to develop 
in the student the inductive and experimental method of 
study, to excite in him an appreciation and love for true ex- 
perimentation and to train his powers for inductive think- 
ing. The method of study is, therefore, distinctively the 
laboratory method. On the average, the student employs 
two hours of time in laboratory study for every hour of rec- 
itation. This proportion of time for the two divisions of 
work is especially carried out in the earlier part of the class 
study. The class room work aims to fix in the mind of the 
student chemical principles and facts based upon what has 
been learned by the actual handling and study of chemical 
substances. 

The worl< is arranged in courses, the course referring to 
the pursuit of a division of the subject for one term without 
regard to the number of hours per week that may be devo- 
ted to it,. Three hours of laboratory study is equivalent to 
one hoar of recitation. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 233 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF STUDY. 

The work is conveniently grouped under the following 
general heads: (a) General and Descriptive Chemistry; 
(b) Analytical Chemistry, Qualitative and Quantitative An- 
alysis; (c) Organic Chemistry; (d) Studies in Applied 
Chemistry. 

(a) General and Descriptive Chemistry includes an ele- 
mentary study of the non-metallic and metallic elements, 
their history, occurrence, preparation, properties and their 
principal compounds. In order better to train his powers 
of observation the student is required to describe the ap- 
paratus used and the phenomena produced, and to trace 
the relation of the results obtained to laws and principles 
which underlie them. The different courses in General and 
Descriptive Chemistry are arranged to meet, as far as is 
practicaole, the special needs of the students of the various 
departments. However, it is recognized that at this stage 
of the work the Science of Chemistry is the student's most 
practical acquisition. 

(b) Analytical Chemistry, both Qualitative and Quanti- 
tative, is taken up in an elementary way at first and may 
be followed by courses in more advanced work. As soon 
as the student has acquired sufficient elementary knowl- 
edge of methods of analysis his attention is directed to the 
analysis of more or less complex mineral and manufactured 
substances. In the recitations, methods of analysis are 
described and discussed and the study of the theoretical 
chemistry carried forward. In this work, courses of study 
are arranged for graduate as well as for under-graduate 
students. 

(c) In Organic Chemistry, courses are offered for the 
first degree and also as major and minor for graduate 
students. 

The course required of the students of the Veterinary 

Department is of an elementary nature and is intended to 

ileit^Sive a sufficient knowledge of the subject to lay the foun- 

lation for the study of Physiological Chemistry which fol- 



234 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

lows. The latter course considers the chemical changes 
going on in the living animal body; the essential composi- 
tion of foods and the changes through which they pass in 
the animal economy; the chemistry of the secretion and 
excretion. The laboratory study is devoted to the three 
principal food constituents and to urine analysis. 

To under-graduate students in the Division of Science is 
given a fairly complete outline of the theory of the struc- 
ture and formation of organic compounds, but special at- 
tention is given to those compounds that are of commercial 
importance. In the laboratory the student prepares many 
of the more important manufactured organic substances, 
such as alcohol and soaps, and makes a special stuay of 
vinegars, sugar, petroleum and its products, glycerine, etc. 

With this work as a foundation the graduate student 
selects some feature or features for more complete study. 
The amount and character of the work is left for arrange- 
ment between the individual and the head of the depart- 
ment. However, this will embrace such work as the analy- 
sis and study of foods, oils, fats, and the methods of prepa- 
ration, purification, and adulteration of commercial organic 
substances. 

(d) It is recognized among persons whose opinions 
are wortby of consideration that the application of any 
science to the problems of life can be profitably taken up 
by the stuaent only after a thorough grounding in the prin- 
ciples upon which the science rests. The purpose of the 
preliminary courses in this subject is to give this training 
as completely as possible. The work in Applied Chemistry 
is, in the nature of the case, essentially quantitative analy- 
sis and consists of courses in Fuel and, Gas Analysis; Blow- 
piping and, Assaying; Metallurgy; Chemistry of the Household; 
Quantitative Chemistry, as applied to ores, iron, steel, foods, 
water analysis, and the application of electricity to quanti- 
tative analysis. 

The course in Fuel and Gas Analysis will consist of the 
study of solid, liquid and gaseous fuels, in reference to 
their composition, and to their relative economic values. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 235 

The student may devote the tinn of this course, principally, 
to technical analysis. Although the work is largely done 
in the laboratory it will be supplemented by lectures and 
recitations. The standard forms of apparatus will be used. 

The principles and methods of quantitative analysis 
learned in the elementary course will be applied in the 
advanced work to the analysis of the various organic and 
inorganic substances, such as foods, iron and steel. The 
application of the facts of Electro-chemistry co the quanti- 
tative analysis of ores, and in the manufacture of chemicals 
will be studied in an elementary manner. 

Quantitative Analysis by the "ttre methods" is applied 
to gold, silver, copper and lead ores. This work is intro- 
duced by a blowpipe study of minerals, and is intended 
to support and supplement the subject of Descriptive Min- 
eralogy and Crystallography which is studied in the De- 
partment of Geology. 

The study of Metallurgy includes the study of fuels used 
in metallurgical processes, ores and furnace methods for 
producing the useful metals. The work is carried on by 
means of lectures, text-book study, charts, and the reading 
of standard works. 

The Chemistry of the Household considers the elemen- 
tary chemistry of the principal food materials, change* pro- 
duced in them during cooking and digesuon, of cleaning 
and of adulteration of the chief food substances. 

The work in Water Analysis covers a study of the meth- 
ods employed, namely, the so-called mineral and sanitary 
analysis, and the interpretation of these results, especially 
from the standpoint of the housenold, and for use in boilers 
in the production of steam. Methods of purification of 
water for these purposes will receive attention. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

FIRST TERM. 

Course I. — Elementary Inorganic Chemistry. — Recitations 
two hours. Laboratory practice, one afternoon. Veterinar- 
ians. Freshmen. 



236 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Course III. — General Chemistry. — Recitations, three 
hours. Laboratory practice two afternoons. Engineers, 
Sophomores. 

Course V. — Qualitative Analysis. — Recitations, three 
hours. Laboratory practice, two afternoons. Continuation 
of Course II. Junior or Senior year. 

Course X. — Elementary Organic Chemistry. — Lectures 
two hours. For students in the Veterinary Department 
only. Junior year. 

Course XI. — Quantitative Analysis. Recitations, two 
hours.. Laboratory practice, three hours. Senior year. Must 
be preceded by Courses II and V or III and VI. 

Course XIV. — Organic Chemistry. Five hours. A con- 
tinuation of Course IX. Work subject to arrangement by 
head of department and student. Senior year, or as a 
major or minor graduate study. 

Course XVI. — Chemistry of the Household. Sixteen lec- 
tures. Senior year. Must be preceded by Courses II, V 
and IX. Offered to students of science as related to the 
industries, and in domestic science. 

Course XVII. — Fuel and Gas Analysis. Three hours. 
Senior year. Elective for students of Division of Science. 
Courses II, V and IX, required. 

Course XVIII. — Electro-chemistry. Three hours. Senior 
year. Elective for students of Division of Science. Courses 
II and V required. 

second term. 

Course II. — General Chemistry. Recitations, three 
hours. Laboratory practice, two afternoons. Sophomore 
year. Division of Science Course. 

Course IV. — General Chemistry (Metals). Recitations, 
two hours. Laboratory practice, one afternoon. Freshmen. 
Veterinary Science students only. 

Course VI. — Qualitative Analysis. Recitations, three 
hours. Laboratory practice, two afternoons. Continuation 
of Course III.. 

Course VII. — Blowpipe Analysis. Recitations, two, and 
laboratory practice three hours for one-half semester. Re- 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 237 

quired of Mining Engineering students, and elective for 
students of Division of Science. Junior year. Courses II 
and V, or III and VI, required. 

Course VIII. — Assaying. Recitations, two hours, and 
laboratory practice, three afternoons for one-haif semester. 
Junior year. Required of Mining Engineering students. 
Elective for students in Division of Science. Junior year. 
Courses II and V, or III and VI, required. 

Course IX. — Organic Chemistry. Recitations, fcur hours. 
Laboratory practice one afternoon. Junior or Senior years. 
Must be preceded by Courses II and V. 

Course XII. — Metallurgy. Lectures and recitations, 
three hours. Senior year. Required of Mining Engineering 
students. Elective for students in Division of Science. 
Courses II, V, VII and VIII, required. 

Course XIII. — Physiological Chemistry. Recitations, 
two hours. Laboratory practice, one afternoon. Junior and 
Senior years. Required of students in Veterinary Depart- 
ment. Elective in Division of Science. Courses II, V and 
IX, required, when elected. 

Course XV. — Analysis of Foods. Three hours. Senior 
year. Elective for stuaents in Division of Science. Courses 
II, V and IX, required. 

Course XIX — Water Analysis. Three hours. Senior 
year. Elective for students in Division of Science. Courses 
II, V and XI, required. 

Course XX. — Special Work in Chemistry for the Prepara- 
tion of a Graduate Thesis. — This subject is usually selected 
along the line of applied chemistry. 

Graduate stuaents will be provided with work in Organic 
and Inorganic Chemistry extending through .wo years if 
desired. 

It is open as a major subject to graduates of this and 
other colleges of equal standing who have pursued the 
study of chemistry for two years and who are by this pre- 
pared to carry on independent work in the various direc- 
tions that may be arranged by them and the head of the 
Department. The courses of study will be along the lines 



238 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

of Applied or Industrial Chemistry with a sufficient ground 
work of theoretical study to give a rational explanation 
and conception of the processes involved. The work will 
include advanced analytical and synthetical chemistry, i. e., 
a study of the methods of chemical analysis and of the prep- 
aration of organic and inorganic compounds of industrial 
and commercial importance. The graduate student will 
select work along some one of these general lines of study 
and will devote his time to this, supporting it by other nec- 
essary collateral study, and such research in the literature 
of the subject as the library facilities will permit. A good 
reading knowledge of the German language will be essen- 
tial to good progress in the prosecution of the work. Minor 
subjects in this department will be arranged so as to help 
as much as is possible the major subjects selected in the 
other departments. 

EQUIPMENT AND ACCOMMODATIONS. 

The Chemical Department occupies two floors of the 
Physical Science building. This space is divided into 
eleven rooms, six of which are laboratories, the remainder 
being lecture, office, balance and store rooms. 

The laboratories contain working tables for one hun- 
dred and twenty students. In connection with each table 
in the main laboratories there are two lockers, and by an 
arrangement of classes the accommodation of the labora- 
tories is increased to over two hundred. 

The assaying laboratory is fitted with slate-topped 
tables, for the accommodation of sixteen students. These 
tables are supplied with gas and air blast. This room also 
contains a complete supply of muffle and crucible furnaces 
for dry assaying. Gasoline furnaces are employed, since 
they enable work to be done more rapidly and in less space 
than the older types of coke or other solid fuel furnaces. 
For quantitative chemical work the department is well sup- 
plied with accurate sets of weights and balances. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 239 

The department is amply equipped with apparatus and 
chemicals for all of the work outlined in the courses of 
study offered. 

Persons desiring to prepare themselves to become 
teachers of chemistry, analytical chemists, or those seek- 
ing a preparation for the study of medicine will find here 
good facilities for study. The expenses are only sufficient 
to cover the actual cost of the material used in the prosecu- 
tion of the work. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

LOUIS HERMANN PAMMEL, PROFESSOR. 
MISS PADDCCK, ASSISTANT. 

Equipment. — The Department of Botany has rooms on 
the first and basement floors of the Main Building. The 
general botanical laboratory has an east exposure, and is 
about 20x30 feet; contains five large laboratory tables, and 
ten individual research tables. The general lecture room 
has a seating capacity for one hundred students, provided 
with charts for the purpose of illustration, and various 
mounted specimens in glass frames that contain weeds and 
diseases of plants. Two other rooms in this building are 
used as a laboratory for advanced students and an office 
room. The collection is mostly contained in these two 
rooms. In the basement there are two rooms devoted to 
bacteriological work in which the various forms of appara- 
tus are kept, such as Arnold's steam sterilizer, Koch's 
steam sterilizer, dry oven for dry sterilization, blood serum 
sterilizer, platinum needles, plate holders for plates, glass 
benches for support of plates, Petri dishes, culture dishes, 
leveling tripod, incubator and thermo-regulator. All the 
laboratories are fully equipped for doing general and ad- 
vanced work in botany. 

The Department of Botany offers excellent facilities, 
not only to the under-graduate students, but to the grad- 
uate students along the lines of economic botany. 

The various collections of the Department now amount, 
to about 30,000 specimens. The herbarium is very full in 



240 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

plants from Iowa and the Mississippi Valley, besides hav- 
ing a large number of plants from the eastern states, Cali- 
fornia and Europe. The collection may be divided into the 
general phanerogamic herbarium which was started by Dr. 
C. E. Bessey and continued by Dr. Halsted, to which num- 
erous specimens have been added during tne last few years. 

There is an excellent collection of grasses. The Col- 
lege is rapidly replacing the material lost by fire. The 
valuable Parry Collection was saved. 

The Parry Collection. — This was purchased at a 
considerable expense from Mrs. Parry. This collection 
contains hundreds of new species found by Dr. Parry on 
his collecting trips, and is especially rich in plants of 
California, Mexico and the Rocky Mountain region. Many 
of these sepcimens were collected before the advent of the 
railroad. Many of the specimens contained in the collec- 
tion are type species and are thus invaluable. 

The Cryptogamtc Collection comprises a large num- 
ber of very valuable exsiccati. It contains, besides the 
Ravenel Fungi Americani, Exsiccati, a rare collection of 
dried plants, the now equally rare Ellis' North American 
Fungi, the Von Thumen Mycotheca Universalis, besides 
numerous smaller collections. 

Living Material. — This department obtains living 
material from the plants grown by the Department of 
Agriculture and Horticulture, the grounds of the latter 
being very rich in ligneous plants from Europe, Asia and 
America. 

Course I. — Elementary Botany. — This course embraces 
;i study of tbe morphology of flowering plants, the terms 
used in descriptive botany and tbe determination of simple 
flowering plants. Cray's T.essons and Manual is used as a 
text accompanied by lectures and specimens designed to 
Illustrate the subject. A collection of fifty specimens of 
flowering plants is required. Excursions to some conven- 
ient point for the purpose of studying the native florn are 
obligatory. Academic year, second term; required of 



'division of science. 241 

students in the Division of Agriculture and Division of 
Science. Recitations and laboratory. Two hours. 

Course II. — Ecology. — A course in which the relations 
of plants to their environment are considered, the rela- 
tions between insects and flowers, pollination by wind and 
other agencies. Dissemination of plants by various agen- 
cies and the distribution of plants over the earth's surface 
and factors that influence distribution; plant communities. 
Excursions are an essential feature of this course. First 
term, Freshman year, in Division of Science and Division 
of Agriculture. First term, Sophomore year, General Do- 
mestic Science Course. Recitations and laboratory. Two 
hours. 

Course III. — Histology. — This course is designed as an 
elementary one. Since students are unfamiliar with the 
use of the microscope they are taught the use of the same, 
beginning with very simple objects, such as an air bubble 
and cotton fiber, then passing on to a study of the cell with 
its contents, such as starch, protoplasm, nucleus, and crys- 
tals. The division of cells and nucleus are studied in light 
of modern investigations. The laboratory work supple- 
ments that of the class-room; the different organs and 
parts of a plant are taken up, not merely as histological 
structures but considered from a physiological standpoint. 
As an illustration, the cuticle, cuticularized and cellulose 
layers of the epidermal cells of an agave leaf are considered 
with reference to their significance in preventing transpir- 
ation. The absorbing, assimilating, aerating and conduct- 
ing system are considered in the same way. Lectures, 
recitations, and laboratory. Freshman year, second term, 
for Division of Science, and second term, Sophomore year 
in Division of Agriculture, and for General and Domestic 
Science Course. Four hours. 

Course IV. — Cryptogamic Botany. — The first term of 
the Sophomore year is devoted to the study of cryptogams 
from a systematic standpoint. Special attention is given 
to "rust," "smuts" and "mildews." The morphology and 
life history of the different groups of cryptogams are con- 



242 IOWA STATE COLLEGE.' 

sidered. Lectures and laboratory, with frequent excur- 
sions. Four hours. 

Coubse V. — Vegetable Pathology comes in the first term, 
Senior year, in which plant diseases of the farm, garden and 
horticultural crops are taken up. In this course, lectures 
on the more injurious of the fungous diseases of cultivated 
plants are considered in a more extended way than is possi- 
ble in the Sophomore year. The theory of immunity and 
prevention of diseases, rotation of crops and fungicides are 
considered. In this course the diseases are treated from 
the standpoint of the host plant. Two or five hours. 

Course VI. — Advanced Cryptogamic Botany. — This course 
embraces a study of the more important orders of crypto- 
gams, especially with reference to the flora of Iowa. This 
course is offered to students in the Division of Agriculture 
in the Junior year, and the Division of Science in Junior 
and Senior years. Frequent excursions are obligatory. 
First term. Three hours. 

Course VII. — Bacteriology is an elective study for stu- 
dents in the Science Course, Junior year, but required of the 
Junior Veterinary, Agricultural and General and Domestic 
Science students. First and second terms. Required, first 
term, second year, two years' course Domestic Science. The 
laboratory work consists in studying some of the common 
germs and bacteriological technique. In the lectures special 
attention is given to sanitation and means of preventing 
contagious diseases. Because of the radical difference in 
many diseases between man and animals the work is taken 
up in two divisions, one considering its relation to human 
health and hygieno, and the general subject of making 
media, sterilization, biology and classification of bacteria. 
Text, Abbott's Bacteriology is used. Two hours. 

Course VIII. — Advanced Bacteriology, — This is an elec- 
tive in the Senior year in which special attention is given 
to a study of water and micro-organisms. The work is in 
advance of that done in the Junior year. It is intended 
especially for persons who intend to enter a professional 
life either along the linos of sanitary engineering or other 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 243 

professions. Frankland's Micro-Organisms of Water, and 
Muir and Ritchie are used as works of reference. Second 
term. Three hours. 

Course IX. — Structural Botany. — This course begins in 
the first term of the Freshman year. The work consists 
of recitations and lectures. The student is expected to 
become familiar with the morphology of flowering plants 
and the terms used in descriptive botany. In the study of 
identification and selection of drugs it is necessary to 
have a thorough botanical knowledge of general structural 
botany as well as vegetable histology. Vegetable drugs 
not only consist of the entire plant but frequently of only 
parts. In this course the general structure of the plant 
from the root to reproductive organs, is taken up and 
considered. In the laboratory the student takes up the 
histology of plants especially from the standpoint of phar- 
macognosy, with a brief survey of the more important 
plants from a systematic standpoint. 

Course X. — Economic Botany. — In this course special 
attention is given to a microscopic study of foods. The 
principal cereals and food plants are studied with refer- 
ence to their general and minute structure as it gives to 
the student a general idea of the nature of vegetable foods 
as well as the reserve material of plants and the systema- 
tic position of our economic plants, where they originated 
and where chiefly cultivated. First term, Junior year. 
Lectures and laboratory work. Two hours. 

Course XI. — Vegetable Physiology. — A course of lectures 
with demonstrations on the functions of plants, nutrition, 
growth, movements and reproduction of higher plants. 
Lectures and recitations. Second term, Senior year. Two 
or five hours. 

Course XII. — Vegetable Cytology and Micro-technique.— A 
study of the cell and its divisions in lower cryptogams and 
higher plants. The use of reagents and staining, methods 
of sectioning and mounting. Recitation and laboratory 
work. Second term, Senior. Three or five hours. 



244 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Course XIII. — Agrostology. — This course is an elective 
one. It is intended to give the student a general idea of 
some of the more important grasses, not only with refer- 
ence to tneir botanical position, but also with reference 
to their economic uses, especially meadow and pasture 
grasses; the cereal food products, grasses in medicine, 
grasses as soil binders, and grasses for lawns and lawn 
making. Lectures and laboratory work. First term, Sen- 
ior. Two hours. 

Course XIV. — Seeds and Seed Testing. — A short course 
of sixteen laboratories and sixteen lectures is given on the 
principal agricultural seeds and their detection in com- 
mercial seeds. Their germinative energy and such other 
features as are important in connection with seed testing. 
First term. Senior. Two hours. 

Course XV. — General Systematic Phanerogams. — This 
course consists of lectures and laboratory work on the 
more important orders of flowering plants, especially with 
reference to the flora of North America. Definite systems 
of classification, Prelinnaean, Linnaean, and post Linnaean. 
In the laboratory each student is assigned some special 
group of plants to work up. The synonymy of the species 
of plants studied by him are looked up. Frequent excur- 
sions are obligatory. Second term, Junior. Three or five 
hours. 

Course XVI. — Poisonous Plants. — The veterinarian is 
frequently called on to investigate poisoning. He should 
therefore be familiar with the plants responsible for poi- 
soning live stock. In this course the subject is treated 
from the historical standpoint, brief reference to the his- 
tory of toxicology, auto-intoxication, poisoning from ptom- 
aines, toxines and agents responsible for such poisoning. 
Poisoning by fungi like toadstools, and ergot. Dwelling on 
life history of these fungi and the poisons they produce. 
The rusts and smuts as possible causes of disease. The 
higher plants are then taken up in a systematic order, 
calling attention to the poisonous plants in the various 
Orders and means for recognizing these plants. Lectures 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 245 

and laboratory work. Second term, Freshman. Two 
hours. 

Course XVII. — Advanced Cryptogamic Botany. Ferns. — 
A course is offered in advanced cryptogamic botany in 
which only the vascular cryptogams are taken up. In this 
course principal attention will be given to the study of the 
chief types of ferns in this state and in the United States 
and the general distribution of ferns and their develop- 
ment. The ferns are frequently cultivated and they are 
objects of interest to every lover of the study of the 
science of botany. Three hours. 

Course XVIII. — Botanical Seminar. — There has been 
organized at the College in connection with botanical work, 
a Botanical Seminar. Here reviews of recent literature 
and topics of general interest are considered, each member 
of the Seminar being assigned a topic to report upon. The 
subjects are then discussed by the members. There are 
also special lecturers who consider certain topics related to 
botany. Seminar meets once a month during the College 
year. Senior year. One hour. 

Course XIX. — Evolution of Plants. — A course of lectures 
dealing with evolution as applied to plants, theories of 
evolution, heredity, origin of plant life, present and past 
distribution. Senior year. One hour. 

Course XX. — Botanical Micro-chemistry. — In this work 
the student becomes familiar with the microscope and its 
parts and the structure of cells and the substances con- 
tained therein, special attention being given to micro-chem- 
istry. This work covers essentially the work given in 
Zimmermann's Botanical Micro-technique. Lecture recita- 
tions »prf laboratory work, Second term, Junior. Five 
hours. 

Course XXI. — Cytology. — An advanced post-graduate 
course in cytology is offered. The student takes up work 
in advance of that given in Course XII, especial attention 
being given to developmental studies of higher plants and 
some of the cryptogams. This study can only be taken 
as a major in post-graduate work, the student also pursues 



246 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

a course of reading along with the laboratory work. Major 
work. 

Course XXII. — Systematic Botany. — The Department 
offers unusual facilities for doing systematic work, the col- 
lection being large and well supplied with type material in 
the way of Phaenogams from the Rocky Mountain and 
Pacific Coast. The student taking this course should be 
sufficiently familiar with the general relations of the flow- 
ering plants and be able to take up special orders. The 
student should be familiar with the modern systems 
of classification, especially those of Engler and Prantl, and 
Bentham and Hooker. Courses are also offered in system- 
atic work among the lower plants, the College having an 
unusually full collection in certain orders especially the 
economic, like Uredineae and Ustilogineac. Minor work. 

Course XXIII. — Advanced Morphology. — In this course 
tl\e comparative anatomy of phanerogams as well as cryp- 
togams is taken up, the student consulting such works as 
Gray, Engler, Eichler and DeBary. Minor work. 

Course XXIV. — Advanced Economic Botany. — The course 
in economic botany is offered as a post-graduate minor, 
and the student will take up such topics as the adulteration 
of foods, seeds, the germination of plants, the vitality of 
seeds, in fact any subject especially pertaining to agricul- 
ture and horticulture and forestry. Minor work. 

Course XXV. — Advanced Mycology. — The subject of my- 
cology is offered as a minor in a post-graduate work, the 
student taking up the study of fungous diseases of cul- 
tivated and wild plants. Minor work. 

Course XXVI. — BdCtcriol u . —is offered as a minor or 
major in ^„.it-graduate work. "The student is expected to 
take up such subjects as sewage pollution of our waters, 
the examination of potable waters, the diseases of plants, 
fermentations. This course will not be given unless the 
prerequisite courses in bacteriology have been taken. 
Minor or major work. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 247 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

HENRY E. SUMMERS, PROFESSOR. 
MR. GUTHRIE, ASSISTANT. 

Equipment. — The laboratory is well supplied with the 
usual apparatus, including compound and dissecting micro- 
scopes, camera-lucidas, microtomes, incubators, paraffin 
baths, aquaria, etc. In the way of illustrative material, in 
addition to the general museum and the entomological 
collections described below, there is a large series of charts, 
a set of wax embryological models, lantern slides, mounted 
microscopic slides, disarticulated and articulated skeletons, 
and alcholic preparations. 

The general museum consists of specimens selected 
with great care to show the variations of structure found 
in the various branches, classes and minor divisions of the 
animal kingdom. Porifera, coelenterata, vermes, echinod- 
ermata, arthropoda, mollusca, and vertebrata are all amply 
represented by actual specimens and Blaschka glass 
models. It is especially rich, however, in representative 
birds and mammals. In addition to a good series of SKele- 
tons, there are over four hundred mounted skins, and 
eggs of three hundred species of birds, and over ninety 
mounted skins of mammals, the latter including such rare 
or peculiar forms as the echidna, ornithorhynchus, great 
kangaroo, kaola, wombat, sloth, great ant-eater, armadillo, 
manatee, peccary, camel, antelope, bison, Rocky Mountain 
goat and sheep, elk, tapir, porcupine, beaver, fur seal, 
hedgehog, lemur and monkey. 

The collection of insects is very large, embracing about 
sixty thousand mounted specimens, including a large num- 
ber of types. There has recently been added to it the Van 
Duzee collection of Hemiptera, from Buffalo, New York, 
including the types of the numerous species described by 
him. There is also a large series of microscopic forms on 
slides, and a large amount of material illustrating life 
histories, especially of injurious insects. 

The work in zoology is designed, first, to give a knowb 
edge of those biological laws, together with the data neces- 



248 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

sary for their thorough comprehension, which is to-day re- 
garded as an essential part of a liberal education; secondly 
to furnish the requisite theoretical oasis for an intelligent 
study of certain practical branches of stock breeding, 
dairying, human and veterinary medicine, and economic 
entomology, which depend directly upon zoological princi- 
ples; and, thirdly, to impart a knowledge of the facts and 
methods of investigation in the last of these practical 
subjects, namely, Economic Entomology. 

Course I. — Introductory Entomology. — This course is de- 
signed as an introduction to all the other work in the 
Department. Insects are used as convenient forms in giv- 
ing a training in accurate observation, and in the methods 
of systematic and field zoology. Some training is also 
obtained in the use of the microscope. The work begins 
with a thorough study of the structure of the grasshopper 
and beetle, followed by the collection of insects and their 
classification. The life histories of certain selected forms 
are also traced. The lectures deal chiefly with those facts 
in the physiology and life history of the different orders 
of insects that cannot be observed in the laboratory. Inci- 
dentally, the general principles involved in dealing with 
injurious insects are discussed. One lecture and one lab- 
oratory exercise per week. Second term, Freshman year. 

Course II. — Vertebrate Zooloqy. — A somewhat thorough 
study of the anatomy, including histology, of the Necturus 
serves as an introduction to the methods of gross dissec- 
tion and gives practice in the use of the microscope. A 
comparison of the frog with the Necturus gives an oppor- 
tunity to impart a knowledge of nomology, and an outline 
of the development of the samp animal lays a foundation 
for the more extended study of vertebrate embryology in 
Course V. This is followed by a briefer study of other 
types, ;is amphloxus, lamprey, fish, turtle, bird and mam- 
mal. Throughout this course the relation of structure to 
function is kept constantly in view, the end being to give 
a conception of each animal as a living being. Three lee- 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 249 

tures and one laboratory exercise per week. First term, 
Sophomore year. Prerequisite, Zoology I. 

Course III. — Invertebrate Zoology. — A continuation of 
the preceding course, devoted to the morphology, phy- 
siology, and especially the ecology of selected types of the 
more important groups of invertebrates, including the 
amoeba, hydra, earthworm, crawfish, and mussel. Especial 
attention is devoted to the Protozoa, a very full discus- 
sion being given in the lectures of the fundamental forms 
in which animai functions are exhibited in this group. 
Questions of phylogeny are quite fully discussed, thus lay- 
ing a foundation for Course VI. Three lectures and one 
laboratory exercise per week. Second term, Sophomore 
year. Prerequisite, Zoology II. 

Course IV. — Entomology. — A study of the structure, 
habits, life histories and classification of insects. Intend- 
ed as a foundation for independent investigation in this 
science, especially in applied entomology. Students have 
access to the entomological library and the rich collections 
of insects of the Experiment Station, and also the oppor- 
tunity to follow the entomological investigations in pro- 
gress here. Two lectures and three laboratory exercises 
per week. First term, Junior year. Prerequisite, Zoology, 
I, II and III. 

Course V. — Embryology. — The laboratory work is de- 
voted to a study of the development of the frog and of the 
chick from preparations made largely by the student, sup- 
plemented by others furnished for comparison by the m- 
structor. The methods of making reconstructions from 
serial sections are learned. In the lectures the general 
principles of development are discussed, beginning with the 
structure of the germ cells, maturation and fertilization, 
and tracing the modifications of cleavage and gastrulation 
found in the different classes of vertebrates. Two lectures 
and one to three laboratory exercises per week. First 
term, Junior year. Prerequisite, Zoology, II. 

Course VI. — Evolution of Animals. — A discussion of the 
problems and factors of organic evolution; heredity, varia- 



250 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

tion, origin and distribution of life, etc. One lecture per 
week. Second term, Senior year. Prerequisites, Zoology, 

II and III and Geology, II. 

Course VII. — Comparative Anatomy. — Advanced work in 
continuation of Courses II and III. Second term, Junior 
year. Three lectures and two laboratory periods per week. 
Prerequisite, Zoology, II, III and V. 

Course VIII. — Animal Parasites. — A course of lectures, 
illustrated by numerous specimens, upon the more injur- 
ious parasites of domestic animals. Intended primarily for 
students of veterinary medicine. Second term, Junior 
year. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, Zoology, II. 

Course IX. — Advanced Entomology. — Special individual 
laboratory work in continuation of Course IV, intended for 
those who expect to pursue entomology as a profession. 
The exact nature of the work in each case will depend upon 
the ability and special object of the student. Three to 
five laboratory exercises per week. First or second term. 
Junior or Senior year. Prerequisite, Zoology III and IV. 

Course X. — Morphology. — Special individual work in 
continuation of Courses II, III, V and VII, designed espec- 
ially for those who expect to become teachers and investi- 
gators in zoology and who are writing their thesis in this 
Department. The work will be given a leaning toward 
general vertebrate or invertebrate morphology, embryology 
or taxonomy depending upon the inclination of the student. 
Three to five hours per week, mainly laboratory. First or 
second term, Senior year. Prerequisite, Zoology, V and VII. 

Course XI. — Neurology. — A course in the comparative 
morphology of the vertebrate nervous system, with especial 
attention to the physiological anatomy of the human brain. 
Two lectures and one to three laboratory exercises per 
week. First term, Senior year. Prerequisite, Zoology II, 

III and V. 

In addition to the above, special courses will be laid 
out for students intending to write a thesis in Zoology, and 
also for graduate students in continuation of the lines of 






DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 251 

work that they pursued as under-graduates. Special facil- 
ities will be offered such students for research work. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY. 

(Human.) 

Course I. — Physiology and Hygiene. — A course of lec- 
tures, with demonstrations and laboratory work, on the 
chief functions of the human body, and on the laws of 
health. The physiology and hygiene proper are preceded 
by a study of mammalian anatomy, including histology. 
Two lectures and one laboratory exercise per week. First 
term. Sophomore year. Three hours. Prerequisite, Chem- 
istry III or Agricultural Chemistry XXIII. 

Course II. — Physiology and Hygiene. — A continuation of 
Course I. Two lectures and one laboratory exercise per 
week. Second term, Sophomore year. Three hours. Pre- 
requisite, Physiology I. 

Courses III and IV. It is expected that a year's ad- 
vanced work, from three to five hours weekly, will be of- 
fered in 1903-04. Courses I and II will be a prerequisite for 
these courses. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

SAMUEL WALKER BEYER, PROFESSOR. 

The work of this Department is carried on by means 
of recitations, lectures, conferences, laboratory work and 
numerous field excursions. The student is not only 
afforded an opportunity to gain some familiarity with the 
principles and theories discussed in the leading text-books, 
but is encouraged to test the theories and verify the prin- 
ciples discussed in the class-room. Field excursions, with 
carefully written reports thereon are required in all of the 
courses in Geology. 



252 ]OWA STATE COLLEGE. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The Department is housed in Morrill Hall, sharing with 
the Department of Zoology, the north half of the building. 
Two rooms on the second floor are given up exclusively to 
the collections in geology, while the "Iowa Room" serves 
as a store room and overflow museum room for the Depart- 
ments of Zoology and Geology and Mining. It is also used 
as a laboratory for the latter department. The office is 
located on the first floor and aside from the usual office 
fixtures affords space for a large map-case and for the 
smaller pieces of apparatus. A large, well lighted recita- 
tion room with a seating capacity of seventy-five is also 
located on this floor. The room is fitted with auxiliary 
blinds, arc light connections and all of the appliances for 
stereopticon purposes, and is used jointly by the two De- 
partments housed in the building. 

The museum contains carefully selected series of fos- 
sils, minerals, rock and ores; all available for study pur- 
poses. Among the more important collections in Geology 
and Mineralogy are: The educational series of rocks, col- 
lected by the United States Geological Survey, the Smithso- 
nian collection of rocks and minerals; the Rohn collection of 
rocks and ores from the L-ake Superior region; the Eng- 
lish mineral collection, containing 200 specimens and about 
150 species; the Baltimore series of more than 200 speci- 
mens of rocks and minerals typical of the petrographic 
province of Baltimore; the Cusbing collection from Clinton 
County, New York; and a considerable amount of material 
to illustrate the physical features of rocks and minerals. 

In paleontology ,the Calvin collection of paleozoic fos- 
sils; a large collection of Coastal Plain fossils, principally 
from the Cretaceous of New Jersey, the Eocene of Alabama 
and Maryland, and the Miocene of Maryland and Virginia; 
the Permo-Carboniferous scries from Kansas and Russia; 
and the coal plants of Iowa, Illinois and Pennsylvania are 
the most important. 

In applied geology the Department possesses compre- 
hensive series of lead and zinc ores with their characters- 






DIVISION OE SCIENCE. 253 

tic gangue minerals from Joplin, Missouri, and from the 
Iowa-Wisconsin area; copper and iron from the Lake Su- 
perior region and from the celebrated localities in the 
Ural Mountains; copper, manganese and silver from Butte, 
Montana; lead and silver from Colorado; and silver and 
gold from Colorado, Nevada and California. 

Aside from the collections enumerated, Dr. H. Foster 
Bain, of the Iowa Geological Survey, has kindly loaned to 
the Department his extensive private collection of rocks 
and minerals; and the Legrand Quarry Company gener- 
ously donated a splendid series of building blocks from their 
quarries which exhibit the various styles of stone dressing. 

The laboratory is supplied with one Bausch and Lomb 
petrographical microscope; one Puess, meuium model, latest 
pattern petrographical microscope; both instruments are 
well supplied with accessories; one Ward mineral dresser; 
one hand gonimoeter; one set Preston's celluoid crystal 
models; one set Krantz wood models; the Krantz collection 
of 120 thin sections of the common rock-forming minerals 
selected and arranged according to Rosenbusch; one section 
slicing machine, and complete apparatus for rock separa- 
tions by heavy solutions; and is supplied with apparatus 
for doing all kinds of photographic work. A considerable 
number of instruments for reconnoissance and field work 
in geology are owned by the Department. 

The lecture room equipment comprises a Hitchcock's 
geological map of the United States; one set of Kiepert's 
physical maps; numerous maps and charts of the United 
State Geological Survey and of the Mississippi River Com- 
mission and an elaborate series of lantern slides and 
photographs. 

COURSES IN GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY. 

Eight courses are offered in Geology and Mineralogy, 
Physiography is required in the Divisions of Science and 
Agriculture; Courses II, IV to VII, inclusive, are required 



'254 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

of students in Mining Engineering; Course III is elective 
to students in Civil Engineering; Course IX is specially 
adapted for the short course in Mining Engineering, while 
Courses II to VIII, inclusive, are elective to all students 
in the Divisions of Agriculture and Science. 

Cottkse I. — Physiography. — First term, Freshman, three 
hours per week; serves as an introduction to the Science 
of Geology. The first half of the term is devoted to the 
study of the agents which have to do with modifying the 
earth's crust, while the resultant earth features receive 
careful consideration during the second half of the term. 
Davis' or Tarr's Elements of Physical Geography is the 
text-book used. Required in the Divisions of Science and 
Agriculture. 

Course II. — General Geology. — Five hours per week first 
half year. This course embraces a discussion of the prin- 
ciples which form the ground work of the science. The 
first ten weeks are devoted to dynamic and structural 
geology and the last six to stratigraphic and historical 
geology. The student is required to make several excur- 
sions to points of geological interest to verify the more 
salient facts discussed in the class room. 

Prerequisites. — The elementary courses in physics, 
chemistry and zoology. Required of students in Mining 
Engineering; elective in the divisions of Agriculture and 
Science. 

Coukse III. — The same as Course II for the first half 
term, but only three hours per week during the last half of 
the term. The second half is devoted to a study of the 
properties, mode of occurrence, origin and distribution of 
the more important structural materials. Elective to stu- 
<:< nts in Civil Engineering. 

Coubse IV. — Advanced Geology. — Five hours per week, 
second term, Senior year. The nature, mode of occurence 
and origin of the minerals and rocks which constitute the 



DIVISION or SCIENCE. 255 

earth's crust are considered in some detail during the first 
half of the term, while rock alteration as involved in 
metamorphism and weathering receives special attention 
during the second half. Excursions are continued as in 
II, and students are encouraged to familiarize themselves 
with the methods employed in doing research work and to 
make independent observations. 

Prerequisites. — Course II. Open to students in the divi- 
sions of Agriculture and Science. 

bourse V. — Economic Geology. — Three hours per week, 
second term, Senior year. This course embraces a discus- 
sion of the general features and formation of ore bodies, 
followed by a description of the distribution and the occur- 
rence of coal and the more important hydro-carbons, build- 
ing stones, potable waters, salines and other products of 
economic importance. 

Prerequisites. — Courses II, VI and VII. Required of 
students in Mining Engineering. 

Course VI. — Mineralogy. — Three hours class room and 
one hour laboratory, second half, Junior year. This course 
is intended to give the student a clear idea of the morphol- 
ogical and physical properties of crystalline substances. 

Prerequisites. — Elementary courses in physics, chemis- 
try and mathematics. Required in the Mining Engineering 
course and optional in the Division of Science. 

Course VII. — Descriptive and Determinative Mineralogy. 
— Three hours' class room and one hour laboratory in the 
first term, Senior year. This term's work is devoted to 
the study of the more important mineral species, their 
properties, uses, distribution and methods of determination. 
Required in the Mining Enginering course and elective in 
the Division of Science. 

Course VIII. — Petrography. — Two nours per week dur- 
ing the second term, Senior year, and is especially a lab- 



256 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

oratory course. It embraces a short course in the micro- 
scopic study of rocks. 

Prerequisites. — Courses VI and VII. Required of stu- 
dents in the Mining Engineering course. 

Course IX. — The Geology of Coal. — Five hours a week 
for ten weeks in the review course in Mining Engineering. 
The origin, distribution and mode of accumulation of coal 
are considered. 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC SCIENCE. 



EDGAR WILLIAM STANTON, PROFESSOR. 

Course I. — Elements of Political Economy. — This course 
is taught by text-book, familiar lectures and class discus- 
sions. The student is made acquainted with the laws of 
production, the theory of value, the principles of domestic 
and foreign exchange, money and its value, and the various 
theories of distribution and consumption. Topics involv- 
ing the application of economic principles are studied; for 
example, industrial co-operation, political money, nation- 
alization of land, bimetallism, taxation, and protection 
versus free trade. Five hours per week. First term. 

Course II. — History of Political Economy. — This course 
is an elective in the Courses in Science. Political 
Economy is here reviewed from the historical standpoint. 
The development of economic fact and theory is traced 
through the ancient, madiaeval and modern world. The 
successive economic schools are taken up; their doctrines 
are <onsidered in connection with the existing industrial 
conditions; their gradual modification and displacement 
by other systems noteu; and thus, through the study of the 
growth of economic thought, the student is led to a clear 
understanding and better judgment of the economic theories 
and practical industrial problems of the present time. The 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 257 

History of Political Economy, by Ingram, is used as a text- 
book. 

A special feature of the work is the presentation of 
topics assigned individual members of the class. The 
following are some of the reference books used: Emerton, 
"Introduction to the Middle Ages," "Mediaeval Europe;" 
Adams, "Civilization During the Middle Ages;" Wilson, 
"The State;" Ingram, "History of Slavery;" Gibbons, "His- 
tory of Commerce in Europe;" Ashley, "Economic History;" 
Cunningham, "Outlines of English Industrial History;" 
Rogers, "Work and Wages," "Economic Interpretation of 
History;" Wrigm, "Industrial Evolution of the United 
States," "Economic Classics." Five hours per week. Sec- 
ond term. 

Course III. — Modern Social Problems with a Special 
study of Socialism. — Given as an elective three times per 
week in the first term, Senior year; Course in Science and 
Course in "General and Domestic Science." 

The course opens with an outline study of the indus- 
trial revolution and the recent development of economic 
theory. Socialism and closely allied economic questions 
are then considered; the text-book used in this part of the 
work being Ely's "Socialism, and Social Reform." 

The reference books are: "History of Socialism," 
Kirkup; "Contemporary Socialism," Rae; "Socialism of 
To-day, Laveleye; "Quintesscence of Socialism," Shaffle. 
Three hours per week. First term. 

! 
DEPARTMENT OF DOMESTIC ECONOMY. 

MARY A. SABTN, PROFESSOR. 
MISS JOHNSTON AND MISS HESS, ASSISTANTS. 

The widespread interest manifested in Domestic Econ- 
>my springs largely from the increasing attention accorded 
o all social problems. The importance of the home as a 

9 



258 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

social factor is paramount; and the application of science 
and of the scientific method of household .management, is 
now regarded a necessity. It is not surprising therefore 
that the study of the home, its function, its administration, 
its sanitary conditions, the preparation of foods, and a score 
of kindred topics should find place in the courses of instruc- 
tion in colleges and universities. The study of Domestic 
Economy is profitable not only because of its practical 
worth to the individual, but because of its educative value, 
as a form of manual training, aiding the development of the 
mind by operations actually performed with the hands. 
Many sciences find direct application in the operations of 
housekeeping; it is consequently the aim of this Department 
to present this home-study in such a way as to apply the 
knowledge gained in related and associated sciences. This 
study seeks at every point the health, convenience and;fc 
comfort of the members of the household, and by its utility 
to add to the value of the well kept home. 

Domestic Economy Hall adjoins Margaret Hall and 
includes the general office, the sewing-room, fitting-room, 
bed-room, laboratory, kitchen, dining-room, and store-rooms, 
all conveniently furnished and equipped for recitations and 
for demonstrations and practice work. 

The methods of instruction embrace the lecture sys- : 
tem, text-book study, laboratory practice, demonstration 
lessons, class discussions, presentation of topics on as- 
signed subjects by individual members of the class, and 
expeditions for observation and criticism. By a judicious 
combining of theory and practice, science and art, the 
student gains a thorough understanding of the underlying 
principles of Domestic Economy and at the same time ac- 
quires skill and deftness in execution. Upon completing 
a systematic course in this Department a young woman 
is prepared to conduct her home successfully and with that 
ease which comes only through knowledge and experience. 

The work offered in Domestic Economy does not con 
stitute a special and separate course of study, but is on< 
of the several lines included In the general College course 






J )1 VISION OF SCIENCE. 259 

for all women students and subject to the usual regula- 
tions concerning entrance requirements, classification, ex- 
aminations, and class records. 

Materials, tools and utensils for laboratory work are 
furnished by the Department and for the use of these 
students in the sewing classes pay a fee of one dollar each 
term; those in cooking, three dollars, each term. 

Four hours each week are devoted to recitation and 
practice in each of the several subjects included in Domestic 
Economy, one of which subjects is offered each term of the 
four years. 



DOMESTIC SCIENCE. 

Course II. — Foods. — This course familiarizes the stu- 
dent with the processes of cooking and with the principles 
underlying the cooking of proteids, carbohydrates and fats, 
The various food stuffs are taken up in the order of their 
simplicity of preparation. The pupil prepares many nour- 
ishing and appetizing dishes, and is trained at the same 
time in the points of accuracy, order and economy and in 

| the general care of the kitchen and its utensils. 

The lectures in this Course deal with the various foods 
prepared in the laboratory, and cover the following general 

! topics: Chemical composition, nutritive value, function in 
the body, digestibility and cost. In connection with this 
a study is made of the most wholesome and scientific method 
of preparing the food under discussion. Freshman year. 
Second term. Four hours. 

Course III. — Foods and Nome Sanitation. — The special 
feature of Course III is the combining and serving of foods. 
In connection with cooking, instruction and practice are 
?iven in marketing, carving, in the care of the dining-room 
md its furnishings, in table-setting, in serving and in 
mtertaining. From time to time breakfasts, luncheons and 
linners are planned, prepared and served by the pupils, 



260 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

familiarizing them with the knoAvledge essential to the 
success of the hostess. 

One hour each week is devoted to Home Sanitation. 
The lectures treat of the site, and construction of the house; 
its plumbing, heating, lighting and ventilation. Sophomore 
year. First term. Four hours. 

Course V. — Foods, Advanced Course. — In the Junior year 
opportunity is given for added practice in cooking. The 
foods which are taken up in this term's work require more 
elaborate preparation than is allowed in the time of the 
earlier courses, and include roasts, bread and rolls, sauces, 
salads, desserts and frozen foods, also canning and preserv- 
ing. The specific foods prepared are determined by the 
need and desire of the students. 

One hour a week is given to a study of food materials, 
which are considered in greater detail than is possible in 
the preceding terms. A study is made of Milk, Butter and 
Cheese, Eggs, Meat, Fish, Vegetables, Bread, Fruit, Food 
Accessories and Beverages. Junior year, first term. Four 
hours. 

Course VIII. — Home Nursing; Laundering. — The last 
term's work in Domestic Science is divided equally between 
Home Nursing and Laundering. The work in Home Nurs- 
ing is presented through lectures illustrated by practical 
demonstrations. This work is conducted by a trained 
nurse. Some time is given to invalid cookery and this in 
connection with the training in nursing enables the young 
women to become intelligent nurses in their own homes. 

The course in Laundering comprises both the theoretical 
and practical sides. A study is made of cleansing pro- 
cesses, treatment of stains and of disinfection. The prac- 
tical work is carried on in a laundry equipped with con- 
veniences for the work. In addition to these subjects tho 
lectures in this course deal with the following topics: The 
organization of the household, expenditures, a study of 
family budgets, domestic service, pecuniary economy oi 
foods, and dietaries. Senior year, second term. Four hours 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 261 

During the first term of the Senior year, provision is 
made in the Dairy Course for young women who desire in- 
struction in Home Dairying; and at the same time the De- 
partment of Chemistry offers a series of lectures in Domes- 
tic Chemistry. 

DOMESTIC ART. 

Coukse I. — Plain Seicing. — The first term's work in 
Domestic Art gives the student a practical knowledege of 
all varieties of stitches in hand-sewing. Bach pupil makes 
a book of models, comprising the various stitches, seams, 
hems, fastenings, plackets, gussets, also patching, darning, 
lace and embroidery matching, and glove mending. In con- 
nection with the sewing, lectures are given upon the use of 
each model, and upon the fabric and the process of its manu- 
facture. Freshman year. First term. Four hours. 

Course IV. — Garment Work.— The work in garment 
making is open to young women who have completed the 
course in Plain Sewing. Each student selects materials for 
underwear and plans, cuts, fits and finishes the underwear 
herself under the supervision of the instructor. Lecture 
work accompanies this course as every course in sewing. 
Sophomore year. Second term. Four hours. 

Course VI. — Drafting and Dress-Making. — This Course 
; furnishes knowledge of the principles of dress-making, with 
: as much practice in their application as time permits. The 
: student purchases, designs, drafts and makes for herself 
! an unlined cotton dress. In this course is offered instruc- 
tion in raffia work, woven and sewed basketry. Junior year. 
Second term. Four hours. 

Course VII. — Drafting and Dress-Making. — Continuation 
of Course VI. Each young woman designs, drafts and 
makes for herself a lined woolen dress. This course includes 
also instruction in making hats; the principles of trimming; 
knowledge of materials; lace joining; wiring and prepar- 
ing materials for trimming; simple hats and bows, making 



262 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

of hat frames, covering and trimming the same. Senior 
year. First term. Four hours. 

Course IX— Theory and Practice of Teaching Domestic 
Economy. — This Course considers methods of teaching, the 
planning of Domestic Science and Domestic Art Courses, 
conducting of classes, management of the laboratory, prob- 
lems of equipment and cost. 

Research work in home sanitation, physiology, and 
chemistry of foods, practical dietetics; cooking and other 
household arts is carried on in connection with the De- 
partments of Chemistry, Botany, and other Sciences. First 
term. Four hours. 

Course X. — Continuation of Course IX. Second term. 
Four hours. 

Course XI. — History of Art and Household Decoration. 
Goodyear's History of Art is used as a text, supplemented by 
lectures and reference work. In House Decoration the 
principles of construction, ornamentation and color are ap- 
plied to furnishings and utensils and to the treatment of 
walls, floors and ceilings. 

The work in these courses is illustrated by photographs 
of architecture, sculpture and painting, and by specimens 
of textiles, wall-papers, pottery, fine glass and silver. Sen- 
ior year. First term. Two hours. 

Course XII. — Continuation of Course XI. Senior year. 
Second term. Two hours. 

Wood Carving. — Manual training in wood-work is offered 
as an elective to the young women during the second term 
of both the Junior and Senior years. The purpose of this 
course is educational. The student constructs and decorates 
articles in wood and becomes familiar with the materials 
and tools of the shop, especially those concerned in wood- 
carving. Junior and Senior year. Second term. Three 
hours. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 263 

TWO YEARS COURSE IN DOMESTIC SCIENCE. 

This course aims to meet the demand for teachers 
thoroughly trained in Domestic Science and Domestic Art 
both on the theoretical and practical sides, and capable of 
conducting classes and organizing courses of study. It 
affords also excellent training for those planning to take 
charge of food preparation in institutions. Candidates for 
admission to the Two Years' Short Course must have com- 
pleted the course of an approved high school or be able to 
meet the Freshman entrance requirements for the General 
and Domestic Science Course. Students completing satis- 
factorily the Two Years' Course receive the Domestic 
Science Diploma. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY. 

ORANGE HOWARD CESSNA, PROFESSOR. 

Course I. — Psychology. — An optional course of elements 
and outlines of Psychology is afforded the first term of the 
Senior year to the students of all the College courses. A 
standard text is used and supplemented by lectures and 
laboratory work. 

Course II. — Ethics. — An optional course in Ethics is 
afforded the second term of the Senior year to the students 
of all the College courses. Several standard text-books of 
Ethics are employed and supplemented by library work and 
lectures. All callings and pursuits of life are based upon 
some element of moral obligation. It is the purpose of this 
instruction in Ethics to give the student a comprehensive 
acquaintance with the principles and the duties of a faith- 
ful life and good citizenship. 

Course III. — Educational Psychology. — The aim of this 
Course is to make a study of the elements of psychology 
and the laws of mental development which underlie the 
educational processes. There will be a study of the Adoles- 
cent period with a view to understanding the psychological 
laws which direct to rational methods of instruction. 



264 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

In the second term the course will also cover at least 
an outline of the history and philosophy of education. 

Lectures, text-book and ciass exercises with library 
work. Three hours per week throughout the year. The 
course is for the students of the Two Years' Course in 
Domestic Science. 

DEPARTMENT OF LITERATURE AND RHETORIC. 

ALVIN B. NOBLE, PROFESSOR. 

MISS LARRABEE, MISS MACLEAN, MISS REED, AND MISS MILLER, 

ASSISTANTS. 

In the courses of English two ends are sought, utility 
and culture. Utility predominates in the first years and 
culture in the last, though there is hardly a recitation but 
contains something of both. 

So long as man communicates his thoughts and feel- 
ings to his fellows, so long will language have a practical 
value. The man who speaks in a bungling manner, only 
half succeeds in communicating his thoughts to others. If 
they catch his real meaning they do it by a happy inference 
of their own as to what he meant to say. But no man can 
afford — certainly no college man can afford — to depend on 
others to correct his own faulty speech. If he uses a wrong 
word, arranges the parts of the sentence improperly, gives 
some part an undue emphasis, or fails to indicate clearly the 
bearing of one sentence upon another, his language does not 
truly represent his thought, and the world may profit little 
from his attempt to state it. The more valuable his 
thought, the greater his need for a clear and effective use 
of language. 

If the student has mastered grammar and rhetoric, 
that is, if he has been trained to apply the principles gone 
over, his speech should be free from errors and inaccura- 
cies of expression. More than this: if he has been directed 
to the study of good models, if he has been taught not 
merely to correct what is faulty, but also— and this is far 
more important— to appreciate what is excellent in diction, 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 265 

in sentence structure, in the development of paragraphs 
and of whole compositions — if he has been made to feel 
the increased utility, the beauty, and the power of language 
as used by the masters of expression, he will not be con- 
tent to use language that has only the negative merit of 
being without faults, but will press on to attain a style 
enriched by the presence of real excellence, a positive qual- 
ity. Such language is not simply clear and accurate, it is 
pleasing and powerful; and the man who has acquired such 
skill in the use of language has greatly increased his in- 
fluence in the world. If he can give his valuable thought 
an adequate expression, his fellows will learn the thought 
from him, and give him honor accordingly; if he cannot, 
they will learn it from one who can state it more clearly 
or more attractively, and the reward is quite as likely to go 
to the man who best states the thought as to the one who 
first discovers it. 

The courses in grammar, rhetoric, and composition are 
devoted primarily to this utilitarian end. The facts 
and principles of language are studied, not as valuable 
in themselves, but as useful when applied in spoken or 
written discourse. To this end the student is required to 
write much, always with some definite object to be accom- 
plished, and usually with some good model before him to 
inspire him to more earnest effort. When once he has 
i learned to draw from his reading suggestions that will be 
helpful in his future compositions, he has found a possible 
utility in everything he studies as literature and has 
opened the door to continual improvement. Moreover, in 
learning to appreciate what is best in the models set before 
him, he gains insensibly something of culture as well as of 
utility. 

The course in debating is designed as a training to- 
ward the effective discussion of live topics. Wherever he 
goes the college graduate is expected to have opinions 
of his own on the topics of the day, to be able to state 
them clearly and forcibly, and, if need be, to defend them. 
To this end he should train himself to close analysis of 



266 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

complex problems, to a severe testing of every conclusion, 
his own as well as other people's. Moreover, the public 
will not wait for him to retire to his study for labored 
preparation. They expect him to be ready when the occa- 
sion calls, and they have generous rewards for the man 
who is ready — ready to map out a clear-cut line of argu- 
ment, ready to support it with proofs, and able to present 
it clearly and forcibly in off-hand discussion. Such read- 
iness comes only from long-continued right-thinking and 
clear-speaking. It is the aim of this course to start the 
student toward this goal. 

In the courses in literature it is probably true that the 
culture side predominates, yet utility is seldom lacking. 
The study of literature calls for close observation, correct 
inference, fine discrimination. When the mind is trained 
to do such work, it acquires a power that abides, a power 
that can be applied to any task. Literature deals with 
the whole range of human experience, emotion, activity. 
In studying literature, therefore, we are required to give 
some study to the mind and heart of man. If such study 
does not exert an elevating influence, it can only be because 
the reader does not choose the best, or does not ap- 
proach the work in the right spirit. At the very least, 
it ought to give him a deeper insight into human nature, 
and that is no small gain. But literature is also an art, 
an art that engages the attention of more people, and holds 
that attention for a longer time, than does any other art. 
In studying it, therefore, we are studying one form of art, 
and in so doing are cultivating the aesthetic sense, a part of 
our nature not appealed to by most studies. Best of all, 
perhaps, it brings us into the company of the rarest minds 
of all times; it gives command of the best thought of the 
best minds; it brings to us the "blessed companionship of 
wise thoughts and right feelings." It broadens the mind, 
quickens the imagination, enlarges the sympathies, enriches 
tho wbole nature. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 267 

COURSES IN ENGLISH. 

ACADEMIC YEAR. 

Course I. — Grammar. — Syntax of good modern prose; 
copious analysis, with emphasis on phrases and clauses as 
structural units of the sentence, and careful study as to 
their proper position and connection; daily drill in sen- 
tence construction, the application of what the student 
has learned from sentence analysis; study of the princi* 
pies of punctuation, with drill in applying them; correction 
of errors in grammar. Study of language direct, with as 
little use of text-book as circumstances will permit. De- 
signed to give that ready command of the sentence that 
shall leave the student free to seek excellence of structure 
without needing to give conscious thought to correctness. 
For admission to this course students must pass an exam- 
ination on the eight parts of speech, their subdivisions, 
inflections, and properties, or else present a teacher's certi- 
ficate or a satisfactory grade in a good high school. All 
courses. Belongs properly to the fall term, but is given 
in the spring term also. Five hours. 

Course I. (a) — Grammar Review. — A review course in 
English I, designed for students who show, by examination 
or by making elementary mistakes in essays written for 
English II or English III, that they need further drill in 
grammar. Students assigned to English I may be promoted 
to this course provided their work for the first two weeks 
is sufficiently good. All courses. Both terms. Two hours. 

Course II. — Elementary Rhetoric and Composition. — De- 
voted largely to the study of the paragraph, with Scott and 
Denney's "Composition-Rhetoric" as text-book. Careful 
analysis of good models, followed by compositions designed 
to apply the methods just analyzed. An essay once a 
week, with exercises almost daily; each student to correct 
the mistakes he has made. Prerequisites, English I taken 
in class or by examination, or diploma from a partly ac- 
credited high school (see page 39.) If a student's essays 
show need of further drill in grammar or punctuation, he 



268 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

will be required to make up the deficiency. Credited in 
the Agricultural Course as a Freshman study, but in all 
other courses as Academic. Belongs properly in the spring 
term, but is given in the fall term also. Five hours. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Course III. — Advanced Rhetoric and Composition. — De- 
voted mainly to the planning of essays and the principles 
involved in the different forms of discourse. An essay once 
a week, with frequent exercises in diction and in making 
plans and outlines. Analysis of good prose models. Prere- 
quisite, English II, taken in class or by examination, or 
diploma from a fully accredited high school (see page 
41.) If a student's essays show imperfect preparation, he 
will be required to ma^e up the deficiency. Required in 
all the four-year courses. Given in both terms; belongs 
properly to the fall term in the Science and Engineering 
courses, to the spring term in the Agricultural course. Five 
hours. 

Course IV. — Composition. — Weekly themes in narration 
and description, based on models read and discussed before 
the class. Prerequisite, English III. Required in all the 
four-year courses, except that students in the Agricultural 
Course may choose between Course IV and Course VI. 
Spring term only. One hour. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Course V. — Composition. — Weekly themes in exposi- 
tion. Prerequisite, the preceding courses in English. Re- 
quired in all the four-year courses. Fall term only. One 
hour. 

Course VI. — Composition. — Weekly themes and briefs 
in argumentation. Prerequisite, the preceding courses in 
English. Required in all the four-year courses except as 
stated under Course IV. Spring term only. One hour. 

The aim of the courses in composition is to train the 
Student to express his thought on whatever subject, not 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 269 

only with clearness and ease but with some measure of 
grace, attractiveness, and power. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Cox'rses VII and VIII. — Debating. — A course in stating 
and defining questions for debate, in making briefs, and in 
extemporaneous debating; the application of argumenta- 
tive principles and methods to live topics. Elective in all 
courses for students who have completed the preceding 
courses in English. Course VII in the fall term, Course 
VIII in the spring term. One hour each. 

COURSES IN LITERATURE. 
JUNOR YEAR. 

Course I. — The Drama. — Devoted mainly to a study of 
Shakespeare, with a rapid survey, largely by reports and 
informal lectures, of the drama before his time, and a 
rapid reading of one or two dramas of subsequent time. In 
Shakespeare one or two plays will be studied carefully and 
one or two others read rapidly. Character analysis and 
interpretation, with grouping and contrast. Plot analysis, 
with stages of complication and resolution. Prerequisites, 
the courses in English for the Freshman and Sophomore 
years. Required in the General and Domestic Science 
Course. Elective in the Agricultural Course and the Course 
in Sciences, Related to the Industries. Fall term. Three 
hours. 

Course II. — Epic and Lyric Poetry. — A course in Eng- 
glish poetry, excluding the drama. Selections from Milton, 
Pope, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, 
and Browning. Classification of the various forms of 
poetry. Study of rhythm, meter, rhyme, alliteration, fig- 
ures of speech, melody, harmony, etc. Principles of criti- 
cism applicable to the poems studied. Prerequisites, the 
courses in English for the Freshman and Sophomore years, 
and History II; Literature I, though not strictly necessary, 
will yet be of great help. Required in the General and 
Domestic Science Course; elective in the Agricultural 



270 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Course in Sciences related to the Industries. Spring term. 
Five hours. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Couese III. — Fiction. — A course in the novel, the ro- 
mance, and the short story, from the time of Scott to the 
present day. Plot and character analysis. Disputed points 
regarding the novel. Outline for systematic study. Com- 
parison with the drama. Prerequisites, Literature I, and 
the courses in English. Elective in the Agricultural Course 
and the two Science Courses. Fall term. Three hours. 

Course IV. — American Literature. — A study of our best 
poets and essayists. Comparison with English authors and 
works. Interrelations of our literature and history. The 
prominent writers of the present day. Prerequisites, Liter- 
ature II and the courses in English. Elective as before. 
Spring term. Three hours. 

DEPARTMENT OF ELOCUTION AND ORATORY. 

ADRIAN M. NEWENS, PROFESSOR. 

The scheme of work laid out in the courses of this 
Department is not calculated to make professional eleocu- 
tionists. We suppose that there are special schools with 
special equipments for that purpose. The work planned 
is of a more general nature, getting at the subject of speech 
from the practical and applicatory side rather than from 
the technical and professional side. With enough theory 
to inspire confidence, we aim to give each student such 
work as will be best suited to him. 

Upon the supposition that each person has an elocution 
of his own, the Department work, outlined in the courses 
below, aims to develop that which each student possesses. 
Sometimes the best powers of the students are covered 
with minor faults in speech; poor emphasis, mumbling, 
drawing, embarrassment, etc.; we endeavor to give him 
such work as will tend to help him to his best self and 
away from these difficulties. The work is based on speech, 
not on gestures or aesthetics. That which will best develop 
the talking powers, the conversational, the oratorical, the 
peaking powers of the student is applied as best the time 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 271 

will allow. The gift to speak is a freely distributed gift, 
more freely given to the human race, possibly, than any 
other, and it should be cultivated in school and college; 
we seek, in class-room work, in private instruction on reci- 
tation and required orations, to help the student to stand 
and think and talk well. 

The class-room instruction is partly text-book work 
and partly practical reading and speaking. In the first 
year we begin with theory and soon come to practice and 
application. The text-book work is the theory and practice 
of reading and speaking. The theory is never separated 
from the practice. What the masters of thought have 
written and spoken form the basis of both theory and prac- 
tice; these thoughts, their works as they are preserved to 
us in literature, are to be analyzed and mastered; they are 
both read and spoken by the student. 

Such work in drills in speech, composed of consonant 
practice, vowel drills, etc., as may best supplement the 
mastery of spoken language, is carried on constantly and 
forms a part of the text-book work. 

In the upper years, when the work becomes elective, 
speech, from the student's individual standpoint, is taken 
up. Orations of the student's own composition are re- 
quired; recitations are committed and delivered, giving 
the student opportunity to master thoughts, himself, his 
class — his audience — at one and the same time. A course 
in extempore speech gives a splendid drill in the practical 
application of the elementary principles. 

In the Course for Women, in the Sophomore year, is 
a course in Aesthetic Culture. This work consists in a 
series of lectures on the different phases of Aesthetics, 
physical drills, looking toward the best development of the 
body, both for health and expression. 

ORATIONS. 

One strong element in some of the courses is the re- 
quired work in oration writing and delivery. The oration, 
a connected address on a stirring topic, carefully written 



272 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

and criticised, carefully drilled and rehearsed, gives a prac- 
tice in thought and bodily control not to be found in any 
other line of work. (The drill is based on class-room work 
in elocution). The independence in writing and platform 
manners thus gained cannot but prove immensely valuable 
to the student in after life, should he be a teacher, a scien- 
tific lecturer, or a man of authority in any line of work. 

In the first term of the Junior year, a course in the 
study of oratorical literature has been inaugurated. The 
oratory that has made history is studied, the subject mat- 
ter and the structure of the great orations are carefully 
analyzed, and then upon some topic agreed upon by teacher 
and student, an oration is required of each member of the 
class and is delivered in their presence, or before soim-i 
literary society, or other body of people. In the Senior 
year an oration is also required. (For courses where this 
work is required and where it is optional, see Courses VIII 
and IX below). 

We hope to send out men and women from the insti- 
tution equipped to tell that which they know in a pleasing, 
forceful and enticing manner. Every one is sure to be 
called upon to tell what he knows at some time or other, 
and the first steps and efforts in this direction, we believe, 
should be attempted before the college work is finished. 
The above outlines seem to be a fair statement of what 
is done in this Department, and represent the course of 
study in Elocution and Oratory believed to be practical in 
any institution of learning. 

PRIVATE WORK. 

A limited number of students of the College may be 
taken for private work in Voice Culture, Physical Culture, 
Reading and Literary Interpretation. A limited number 
of students of the College may be taken for special coach- 
ing and drill on special selections and recitations and ora- 
tions preparatory to contests, commencements and special 
programs. 



i'l\ LSION OF SCIENCE. 273 

This work is under fixed tuition, which prices may be 
obtained by addressing the President of the College or the 
Head of the Department. 

COURSES IN ELOCUTION AND ORATORY. 

Course I. — (Required) First Term Academic, two 
hours per week. All courses except Veterinary. 

Text-book work and lectures on Purpose, Emphasis and 
kindred subjects in connection with the practical work in 
reading. (Very little committing is required of the student. 
The lessons are concentrated upon select readings). 

Course II. — (Required) Open to students who have 
completed Course I. Freshman, second term, one hour 
per week. All courses except Engineering and Veterinary. 
Analysis of masterpieces for reading aloud. Thought get- 
ting and giving. Lectures on supplementary topics, vocal 
and physical expression. 

Course III. — (Elective) Open to students who have 
passed Course I. Juniors and Seniors preferable. Junior 
year. First term, two hours. Courses in Science and Agri- 
culture. 

Lectures on practical work in Literary Interpretation, 
Imagination and its work. Papers on assigned topics re- 
quired and read in class. Practical platform work. 

Course IV. — (Elective) Continuation of Course III. 
Juniors and Seniors preferred. Junior year, second term, 
two hours. Courses in Agriculture and Science. 

Lectures on platform work and the delivery of literary 
and oratorical productions, with some practical work. 

Course' V. — Open to Seniors who have completed 
Course IV. Senior year, first term, two hours. Courses in 
Agriculture and Science. 

Lectures on Oratory, Orations and Orators. Platform 
work and the delivery of the required oration with criti- 
cisms and drills. (Students have the privilege of one hour 
drill previous to the delivery of the oration in class). 

Course VI.— Open to Seniors only. Senior year, sec- 
ond term, one hour. Courses in Agriculture and Science. 



274 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Lectures on Extemporaneous Speech, Toasts, Forensics, 
etc. Work in class on these lines with debates, etc. 

Couese VII. — Course for women. Sophomore year, 
first term, two hours. 

Lectures on Aesthetic Culture and Expression, with 
drill and practical work in class. 

Course VIII. — Public speaking. Required, second term, 
Junior year. Courses in Science and Agriculture. 

Study of the speeches and orations of the masters of 
oratory. Text-book work. Outlines of speeches and ora- 
tions. One address required of each student. 

Course IX. — Orations. Required in second term, Jun- 
ior, and first term, Senior. Courses in Science. Elective 
in Course in Agriculture. 

Oration written under direction of the head of depart- 
ment and drilled by him. 

LATIN. 

BESSIE B. LARRABEE, INSTRUCTOR. 

The courses in Latin have in mind, first, the useful- 
ness of language study for mental culture and drill, and, 
second, the incidental value that a knowledge of Latin has 
for the grammar and vocabulary of the English language. 
It is thought that Latin, being wholly analytic and subjec- 
tive in character, and having played so large a part in the 
history of the English language, is indispensable in a dis- 
tinctively technological school for the full rounded prepara- 
tion of the scientific student. 

In the Courses in Science, Latin is an elective during 
the Academic, Freshman and Sophomore years, and requires 
five terms' work for full credit. It may be chosen for one 
more term in the course in General Science for Women. In 
the Agricultural Course, Latin is optional for Freshman, 
Junior and Senior years. 

In Courses I and II Collar and Daniell's First Latin 
Book is completed and some easy passages read. 






DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 275 

In Courses III and IV parts of Caesar are read, together 
with selections from Nepos and the poets. 

In Course V, Cicero's Orations, and in Course VI, the 
first three books of Virgil are read. 

DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES. 

LIZZIE MAY ALLIS, PROFESSOR. 
MISS NORTON, ASSISTANT. 

The College now offers a two and one-half years' 
Course in German and two years' Course in French. 

Students elect French or German in the Freshman year 
of all the Engineering Courses. 

In the Academic year of the Course in Science, German 
is optional with Latin, provided the English grammar of 
the Academic year has been completed. 

In the Freshman year of the Course in Science, second 
year German, and first year French are optional with second 
year Latin. 

In the Sophomore year of the same course, for the first 
term, third year German and second year French are 
optional with third year Latin. 

In the Course for Women, in the Academic year, Ger- 
man is optional with Latin, if English grammar of the 
Academic year has been completed. 

German and French are optional with Latin in the first 
two years of the Course for Women. 

German and French are electives in the Junior and 
Senior years of the same course. 

FRENCH. 

Course I. — First Term. — Chardenal's "Complete French 
Course," is used as text-book for the grammatical work, 
supplemented by conversation and dictation exercises. 

Course II. — Second Term. — Translation and study of 
"Contes de Fees," Joynes; "L'bbe Constantin," Halvevy. 

Course III. — Third Term. — "Colomba," Merimee; "Un 
Philosophe Sous Les Toits," Souvestre. 



276 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Course IV. — Fourth Term. — "Les Forceurs de Blocus," 
Jules Verne; Monte-^risto, Dumas; A Scientific French 
Reader, Herdler. 

GERMAN. 

Course V. — First Term. — Spanhoofd's "Lehrbuch der 
Deutschen Spracne," including grammar composition, read- 
ing and conversation. 

Course VI. — Second Term. — "Lehrbuch der Deutschen 
Sprache," with continued drill in the principles of declen- 
sion, conjugation and syntax. Storm's "Immensee." 

Course VII. — Third Term. — "Hoher als die ivirche, " 
Hillern; "Fritz auf Ferien," Hans Arnold. "Der Zerbroc- 
hene Krug," Zochokke. 

Courses VIII and IX. — Fourth and Fifth Terms. — "Ger- 
man Science Reader," Gore; Works of Goethe and Schiller, 
conversation and study of syntax being continued through- 
out the course. 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY. 

ORANGE HOWARD CESSNA, PROFESSOR. 

Increasing emphasis is rightly placed on the value of 
the study of history both from the standpoint of general 
culture and usefulness. The men and women who take up 
the duties of citizenship in this day should have the 
broadest outlook and come to their tasks with a sympathetic 
appreciation of what the world has already achieved. No 
study can have a more practical bearing upon the prepara- 
tion of the citizen than the evolution of human institutions. 

The present day utilitarian view of life may sacrifice 
the man and the citizen in the interest of the specialist, 
yet in reality he is the most successful in his specialty, 
other things being equal, who comes to it with the broadest 
general preparation. 

In view of these facts, the Courses in History aim to 
give, as far as possible in the limited time alloted, a good 
general view of the evolution of social, economical and 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 277 

political institutions and the main elements of civilization 
in general, and to fit the student for intelligently assuming 
the duties of citizenship. 

The student has at his command the large College 
Library, which contains, besides the principal works of 
reference, an important section devoted to historical sub- 
jects. Quite an addition to the library has been recently 
made of the new books covering the later phases of his- 
torical development. 

The text-book in each case is equivalent to about one- 
half the required work. The remainder is covered by the 
lectures and library and thesis preparation. 

Seven courses in history are offered, as follows: 

Course I. — General History. — A general survey of the 
history of the world. Special attention is given to the 
unity of historic movement and the consideration of the 
great forces which have produced the social and political 
institutions of the modern world. 

A text-book is used which is supplemented by lectures 
and library work. Five hours per week, first term of the 
Academic year of the Science and Engineering courses and 
the first term of the Freshman year of the Course in Agri- 
culture. 

Course II. — English History. — A general survey of Eng- 
lish history with special reference to the origin and growth 
of the social and political institutions out of which Ameri- 
can civilization grew. The struggles for religious and 
political liberty are noted with care, together with a gen- 
eral view of the main elements and institutions of Anglo- 
Saxon civilization. 

The text-book is supplemented by lectures and library 
work. Four hours per week, second term of the Acade- 
mic year of the Science and Engineering Courses and the 
second term of Freshman year of the Course in Agriculture. 

Course V. — Mediaeval History. — Beginning with a brief 
review of the main features of Greek and Roman civiliza- 
tion, the course covers a general survey of the Middle 



278 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Ages from the invasion of the barbarians to the close of the 
fifteenth century. Special attention is given to the new 
elements introduced by the Germanic peoples and the 
development of the great institutions of the Mediaeval per- 
iod, together with the origin and early growth of the modern 
states of Europe. 

The text is supplemented by lectures and assigned 
readings with written work. Five hours per week. 

Elective in the first term of the Junior year of the 
Courses of Science and Agriculture. Required in either 
the Junior or Senior year of the Course in General and 
Domestic Science. 

Course I is a prerequisite for entering this course. 

Course VI. — Modern History. — This Course aims to 
familiarize the student with the main facts in the develop- 
ment of the modern states of Europe. There is a careful 
study of the Revolutionary periods and the progress of 
Democracy, also an endeavor to understand the essential 
features of world politics of the present day, and the signi- 
ficance of the movements in the Far East. 

The text is largely supplemented by lectures and 
library work. Five hours per week, elective in the second 
term of the Junior year of the Science and the Agricultural 
courses. Required in either the Junior or Senior year of 
the Course in General and Domestic Science. Course V, 
a prerequisite for entering this course. 

Course III. — The Development of the United States. — A 
study of the origin and growth of the social, economic and 
political institutions of the American nation. The aim is 
not only to understand the development of the past but the 
significance of the present day movements as the United 
States enters as a factor in the world politics at the begin- 
ning of the Twentieth Century. 

Text-book, lectures and extensive library work together 
with thesis preparation. 

Five hours per week. Elective in the first term of the 
Senior year of the Science and Agricultural Courses. 






DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 279 

Course IV. — History of Civilization. — The aim in this 
Course is to give at least an outline of the permanent ele- 
ments of human progress with some reference to the evolu- 
tion and philosophy of the great movements in the develop- 
ment of modern civilization. 

Text-book, lectures and thesis work. 

Five hours per week, elective in the second term of the 
Senior year of the Science and Agricultural Courses. 

Course VII. — The Historic Development of the XlXth Cen- 
tury. — The aim of this course is to study the causes and sig- 
nificance of the French Revolution and from that point to 
trace historic development during the XlXth Century with 
special reference to the world movements at the beginning 
of the 20th Century. The purpose is to put the student in 
touch with the revolutions and reconstructions of the past 
century that he may understand the significance of the 
great transitional movements which mark the beginning 
of the present century. 

The course has been prepared for the engineering stu 
dents and may be taken in either the Junior or Senior Year 
Text-book, lectures and library work. Two hours per week 
The course will be given both terms in each year. 

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

JAMES RUSH LINCOLN, PROFESSOR. 

It is not intended to complete the education of the 
thorough soldier, but to fit young men for filling intelli- 
gently, positions in the State troops as line officers and 
company instructors. The constant demand for men thus 
trained emphasizes the value of a thoroughly organized 
and well sustained military course. The chief advantages 
derived are the acquirement of a dignified carriage of the 
person, a gentlemanly deportment and a self-respecting 
discipline, with habits of neatness, order and punctuality. 
Opportunities are afforded each cadet for extending the 
studies in military science, as desired, the College being 
provided with the necessary arms, accoutrements and out- 



280 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

fits for drill and instructions in the infantry, artillery, and 
signal tactics, for which special classes will be formed. 
Lectures on military subjects are delivered throughout the 
course, and regular battalion drill and parade take place 
eacli Monday and Wednesday afternoons. All male stu- 
dents of the College, except such as may be excused on 
account of physical disability by proper authority, are re- 
quired to become members of the College battalion, and 
wear the prescribed uniform during military exercises. 
Students in the Academic year are not required to drill. 

Course I. — First Term, Freshman Year. — Two drills 
each week. 

Course II. — Second Term, Freshman Year. — Two drills 
each week. 

Course III. — First Term, Sophomore Year. — Two drills 
each week and Non-Commissioned Officers' School of one 
hour each week; School of the Guides and Guard Duty. 

Course IV. — Second Term, Sophomore Year. — Two 
drills each week, and Non-Commissioned Officers' School 
of one hour each week; Drill Regulations and Guard Duty. 

Course V. — First Term, Junior Year, and 

Course VI. — Second Term, Junior Year. — Two drills 
each week, and Officers' School of one hour each week; 
Drill Regulations. Guard Duty and Army Regulations. 
Elective in all courses. 

Course VII. — First Term, Senior Year, and 

Course VIII. — Second Term, Senior Year. — Two drills 
each week and Officers' School of one hour each week; 
Service of Security and Information; Military Engineer- 
ing; Military Law, and Military Hygiene. Elective in all 
courses. 

THE LIBRARY. 

VINA ELETHE CLARK, LIBRARIAN. 

MISS STEVENS, ASSISTANT. 

The College Library numbers about 15,000 volumes, 
these being standard works of history, biography, engin- 
eering, agriculture, natural science, mental and moral phil- 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 281 

osophy, poetry, general literature and references. It has 
been arranged with a view to making it especially valuable 
as a reference library. 

The books are selected by specialists, the heads of de- 
partments indicating such works as they wish the library to 
have bearing upon their respective lines of study. 

The library is classified according to the Dewey system 
and the card catalog is in two parts, the Dictionary (author 
and title) and Classed. 

The library receives about 200 periodical publications, 
literary, scientific and general, and there are complete files 
of many of these upon the shelves. 

Th library 4 has on file 3,500 unbound pamphlets, and 
is in constant receipt of large numbers of pamphlet publi- 
cations from the various departments of the government, 
agricultural experiment stations and other sources. The 
library has also several hundred bound volumes of govern- 
ment publications, such as Geological Surveys, United States 
Experiment Station Bulletins, Congressional Record, War 
of Rebellion Record, Census Reports, Cabinet Officers' Re- 
ports, etc. 

The reading room of me library is a large, well-lighted 
room, and is open to readers ten hours daily, except Satur- 
days and Sundays, when it is open four and five hours re- 
spectively. Current numbers of periodicals are kept in the 
reading room and are accessible to all, as are newspapers, 
College exchanges, dictionaries, encyclopaedias, Poole's In- 
dex, the card catalogue, etc. 

The library subscribes for several Chicago, Kansas City 
and Iowa aanies, and, through the courtesy of the editors, 
a large number of the daily and county newspapers of Iowa 
are sent to the reading room for tne use of students. 

Personal assistance and suggestions upon all matters 
relating to the library win be given by the librarian and 
assistant to all who desire such help. 

All students in the Freshman Year in all courses are 
required to take Library work to the extent of four hours 
per term. 



282 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Course I. — Library Work. — Four hours in the First 
term, Freshman year. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC. 

FRANK J. RESLER, DIRECTOR. 

The general plan of instruction is similar to uat of the 
best conservatories, and aims to cultivate in the pupil an 
intelligent appreciation of the noble and beautiful in music. 
It is designed to lay a sound foundation upon which to build 
rather than to impart a superficial knowledge for the pur- 
pose of display. The branches taught are Piano, Pipe Or- 
gan, History of Music, Voice Culture and Sight Singing. 

PIANO — COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 

Grade 1. — Rudiments of Music, Touch and Technique, Prep- 
aratory Exercises by Kohler, Czerny, Duvernoy, 
etc. 

Grade 2. — Touch and Technique. Exercises by Concone, 
Loeschorn, Czerny, Heller, etc. Octave studies 
and easy pieces by good composers. 

Grade ?>. — Touch and Technique. Sonatas by Haydn and 
Mozart. Selections from Schubert, Heller, etc.; 
studies by Plaidy, Czerny, etc. 

Grade ' h — Sixty selected studies by Cramer-Buelow, Bee- 
thoven's Sonatas. Selected works from Mendels- 
sohn, Weber, Chopin, Rubinstein, Liszt, etc. Daily 
studies by Tausig. 

VOTCE CULTURE. 

The method of vocal study aims, by graduated exercises 
and pieces carefully selected, to develop quality of tone, 
flexibility, power and compass of voice along with correct 
style and expression in ail kinds of songs. 

The method aims at ease of production of tones, culti- 
vation of the proper sensation of each tone, correct phras- 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 



283 



ing, and withal, clean enunciation. Throaty, breathy, pala- 
tal and nasal tones are eradicated. 

All advanced pupils are admitted free to a large chorus 
choir, under the leadersh-p of the Director of Music. Only 
the best works from the great composers are used, and it is 
believed that the proper rendering of such music is of no 
little benefit to the musical culture of the earnest student. 

The chorus furnishes the music at the Sabbath service 
and assists in the concerts and public recitals of the depart- 
ment. 

Public concerts and recitals are given at frequent in- 
tervals during the year; also private recitals weekly, in 
which all music pupils will be expected to take part. 

Students may enter at any time. All tuition and piano 
rent is payable in advance to the director. 

Students may enroll for music alone without additional 
expense. 

EXPENSES. 

Tuition for half-hour lessons in each brancla: 

For term of twenty lessons $15 . 00 

For term of thirty lessons 21 . 50 

For term of forty lessons 28.00 

The Department of Music is prepared to furnish prac- 
tice rooms with piano, light and heat for the following- 
rate: One hour daily for the entire scnool term, $3.00. 

For additional hours the rate per hour will be a little 
less. All music will be furnished at a discount. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE FOR WOMEN. 



Training in this department is required through the 
first three years of the college course. Gymnasium work 
begins the middle of October and ends April 1st. Two forty- 
five minute periods a week are required. The system of 
exercises used is eclectic, being adapted from various sys- 
tems, but perhaps more largely from the Sargent and An- 



284 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

derson than any others. Work with light apparatus such 
as clubs, dumb-bells, poles and bar-bells alternates with free 
gymnastics, fancy marching and posing. 

In the early fall and in the spring, tennis, basket ball 
and other out-door sports obtain, and all of tne young women 
are encouraged to take part in them rather than a few en- 
couraged to do a great deal. The costume required for 
physical culture is a suit of dark blue flannel or serge of 
light weight, consisting of blouse and full divided skirt 
falling four inches below the knee; gymnasium shoes with 
square toes and low heel. 



LIST OF STUDENTS 



286 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



SENIOR HONOR STUDENTS, 1902. 

Each of the following has the highest standing in the 
course represented. 

Margaret B. Stanton, Course in General and Domestic 
Science. 

May Miller, Course in Science. 

J. G. Hummel, Course in Mechanical Engineering. 

F. M. Weakley, Course in Mining Engineering. 

John A. Felton, Course in Electrical Engineering. 

H. J. Ludwig, Course in Civil Engineering. 

Clyde W. Warburton, Course in Agriculture. 

C. L. Elliott, Course in Veterinary Science. 

The remaining two are those having the highest aver- 
age standing of all the candidates for degrees from all the 
courses, excepting those that represent some particular 
course. 

Josephine Barclay, Course in General and Domestic 
Science. 

F. E. Nichols, Course in Electrical Engineering. 

POST-GRADUATES. 



NAME. 


POSTOFFJCK. 


COUNTY. 


Erwin, Arthur T., B. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Faurot, F. W., B. Sc, 


St. Louis, 


Missouri 


Gray, C. E., B. S. A., 


Col. Junction, 


Louisa. 


Hess, Alice Ward, Sc, 


Olin, 


Jones. 


Johnson, C. P., B. Sc, 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Paddock, A. Estella, B. Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Knight, Addie Louise, B. Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Morrison, Ruth, B. Ph., 


Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


Myers, E. C, B. S. A., 


Flandreau, 


8. D. 


Williams, Ira Abraham, B. Sc 


Manley, 


Worth. 


SENIORS. 




NAME. COUBSE. 


TOWN. 


COUNTY. 


Ahlors, F. R., Vet. 


Lamotte, 


Jackson. 


Angier, G. H., Ag. 


Storm Lake 


R uen a Vista 


Austin, J. C, M. E. 


Spirit Lake, 


Dickinson. 


Baldwin, A. T., Vet. 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE. 



287 



Barber, Florence, G. & D. S., 
Barclay, Josephine, G. & D. S. 



Barger, May, 
Barton, Elva. 
Bell, Jesse D., 
Bennett, Herbert, 
Blanche, Geo. W., 
Bower, Walter C, 
Brown, Franklin, 
Campbell, Grace, 
Campbell, J. R., 
Carter, Geo. L, 
Chambers, L. M., 
Clark, L T.. 
Cleghorn, M. P., 
Coye, John S., 
Donnelson, W. C, 
Elliott, C. L., 
Elwell, F. D., 
Elwell, F. N, 
Felton, John T., 
Frandson, Herman, 
Goulcl, J. H., 
Graham, Ralph, 
Hancock, Emma, 
Hanger, S. M., 
Hawk, J. O., 
Higgins, E. C., 
Hummel, J. G., 
Hurst, Wilbur, 
Hytland, Thyra, 
Jenkins, A. F, 
Jenks, Frances, 
Jenks, Ada, 
Johnson, S. P., 
Keith, Robert, 
Kelly, W. T., 
Larson, Chris, 
Lee, E. E., 
Ludwig, H. J., 
Lytle, W. H., 
Martin, Clive, 
Merritt, Alice, 
Miller, May, 
Miller, W. E., 
Morgan, Charles, 



G. & D. S., 
G. & D. S., 
Ag., 
C. E., 
Vet., 
Vet., 
Ag. 
G. & D S.i 
Vet., 
Sc„ 
Min. Eng., 
Sp. Sc, 
E. E„ 
Sc. 
Ag., 
Vet., 
M. E., 
Vet., 
E. E. 
Ag., 
Vet, 
Vet., 
G. & D. S., 
Ag., 
Sc, 
E. E. 
M. E., 
Vet., 
G. & D. S., 
E. E, 
G. & D. S., 
G. & D. S., 
E. E., 
M E, 
M. E., 
Ag., 
M. E., 
C. E., 
Vet., 
Vet., 
D. S., 
Sc, 
Vet, 
Vet, 



New Hampton, Chickasaw. 
West Liberty, Muscatine. 
Ontario, Story. 

Luverne, Kossuth. 

Bell wood. Nebraska. 

Milford, New Hampshire. 
Conrad, Grundy. 

West Union, Fayette. 
Boone, Boone. 

Newton, Jasper. 

Des Moines, Polk. 
Rock Valley, Sioux. 
Waverly, Bremer. 

W. Br&tt\ebovo,Vermont. 
Onawa, Monona. 



G. & 



Morrison, M. Ethelda, G&DS. 



Carson, 

Ogden, 

Sioux City, 

Ames, 

Ames, 

Neola, 

Story City, 

Fairmont, 

Newton, 

West Union, 

Paton, 

Foster, 

Ames, 

Newton, 

Ames, 

Ames, 

Washta, 

Coon Rapids 

Coon Rapids 

Des Moines, 

Des Moines, 

Red Oak, 

Jewell Jc, 

Iola, 

Evanston, 

Kelly, 

Des Moines, 

Grundy Center,Grundy 

Ames, Story. 

Des Moines, Polk. 

Humboldt, Humboldt 

Ames, Story. 



Pott'ttamie. 
Boone. 
Woodbury. 
Story. 
Story. 
Pott'ttamie. 
Story. 
Minnesota. 
Jasper. 
Fayette. 
Greene. 
Monroe. 
Story. 
Jasper. 
Story. 
Story. 
Cherokee. 
Carroll. 
Carroll. 
Polk. 
Polk. 

Montgomery 
Hamilton. 
Kansas. 
Illinois. 
Story- 
Polk. 



288 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Muhs, L. R., 


C. E„ 


Camanclie, 


Clinton. 


McBirney, J. F., 


C. E., 


Conrad, 


Grundy. 


McClure, H. B., 


Ag., 


Dallas Center 


, Dallas. 


Mclntire, H. A., 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


McKinney, R. C, 


Sc, 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Nichols, F. E., 


E. E., 


Atlantic, 


Cass. 


Nowlan, E. R., 


E. E., 


Havelock, 


Pocahontas 


Oldsen, C. A., 


Ag., 


Wall Lake, 


Sac. 


Otto, W. W., 


Sc, 


Castana, 


Monona. 


Peck, DeWitt, 


Ag., 


Deer Lodge, 


Montana, 


Peshak, R. E., 


M. E., 


St. Ansgar, 


Mitchell. 


Rantschler, Luella 


, G. & D. S., 


Pueblo, 


Colorado. 


Rew, N. C, 


Ag., 


Corydon, 


Wayne. 


Rolfs, F. W., 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Scholty, W. C, 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Skinner, H. G., 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Slifer, Clyde, 


Sc, 


Grundy CenterGrundy. 


Stanton, Margaret, 


G. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Stevens, S. W., 


Sc, 


St. Louis, 


Missouri. 


Stewart, J. E., 


C. E., 


Packwood, 


Jefferson. 


Stuhr, Walter, 


Vet, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Wall, John C, 


Ag., 


Ankeny, 


Polk. 


Warbnrton, Clyde, 


Ag., 


Independence 


Buchanan 


Weakley, F. M., 


Min. Eng., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Welsh, Chas. A., 


C. E., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Wood, A. L., 


Vet., 


Prairie City, 


Jasper. 




JUNIORS. 




NAME. 


COURSE. 


TOWN. 


COUNTY. 


Allen, R. M., 


Vet, 


Marshalltown 


Marshall. 


Allison, Frank E., 


Ag., 


Lohrville, 


Calhoun. 


Andrews, E. V., 


M. E., 


Marshalltown 


Marshall. 


Bartholomew,E. E 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Battey. Walter R., 


M. E., 


Dexter, 


Dallas. 


Bennett, A. F., 


E. E., 


Wyoming, 


Jones. 


Beverly, Mabel, 


G. & D. S., 


Ames. 


Story. 


Bingham, Buelah, 


G. & D. S., 


Ames. 


Story. 


Blair, Robert A., 


C. E., 


Humboldt, 


Humboldt. 


Bower, Mae, 


G. & D. S., 


West Union, 


Fayette. 


Branch, J. G., 


Min. Eng., 


Gladbrook, 


Tama. 


Brhel, John, 


M. E., 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Brown, Paul H., 


Ag., 


Sioux City, 


Woodbury. 


Brown, Daisy, 


Sp. Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Brown, Josephine, 


Sc, 


Shelby, 


Shelby. 


Brown, John T., 


C. E., 


Shelby, 


Shelby. 


Buchanan, C. C, 


E. E., 


Lamoille, 


Marshall. 






STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE. 



289 



Buck, Leon, 


G. & D. S. 


Moulton, 


Appanoose. 


Buckley, A. R., 


E. E. 


Shelby, 


Shelby. 


Butts, B. J., 


E E. 


Van Wert, 


Decatur. 


Byl, F. M., 


M. E. 


Cedar Falls, 


Black Hawk 


Carey, J. R., 


Ag. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Chattin, A. B., 


C. E. 


Anthon, 


Woodbury. 


Cleghorn, J. C, 


Min. Eng. 


Onawa, 


Monona. 


Crocker, Thomas J. 


E. E. 


Perry, 


Dallas. 


Cummins, William, 


Vet. 


Milford, 


Pennsylvania 


Day, Dudley, 


Sc. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Dimmitt, H. G., 


M. E. 


Ottumwa, 


Wapello. 


Dixon, C. 0., 


Ag. 


Stuart, 


Guthrie. 


Dodd, T. W., 


C. E. 


Traer, 


Tama. 


Dodge, H. K., 


C. E. 


St. Ansgar, 


Mitchell. 


Donovan, D. E., 


C. E. 


Waverly, 


Bremer. 


Ebersole, H. N., 


M. E. 


Keokuk, 


Lee. 


Elder, A. E., 


Sc. 


Allerton, 


Wayne. 


Ellenbarger, H., 


Ag. 


Norman, 


Oklahoma. 


Eveland, Porter, 


E. E. 


GardenGrove, 


Decatur. 


Farmer, H. L., 


Sp. Sc. 


Sioux Rapids, 


Buena Vista 


Fitch, T. T., 


C. E. 


Lytton, 


Sac. 


Fogg., Maurice, A., 


E. E. 


Sioux City, 


Woodbury. 


Gearhart, Guy S., 


M. E. 


Jewell, 


Hamilton. 


Gidley, T. W., 


Vet. 


Strahan, 


Mills. 


Goss, H. D., 


E. E. 


Windom, 


Minnesota. 


Grant, Nellie, 


G. & D. S. 


Rolfe, 


Pocahontas. 


Hanson, Lillian, 


G- . & D. S. 


Odebolt, 


Sac. 


Hendrix, W. W., 


C. E. 


Letts, 


Louisa. 


Hobein, C. A., 


E. E. 


Estherville, 


Emmet. 


Holbrook, M. B., 


C. E. 


Onawa, 


Monona. 


Hollis, Alfred, 


Vet. 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Hopkins, Richarl, 


C. E. 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Houck, E. C, 


E. E. 


Bedford, 


Taylor. 


Howard, E. R., 


Ag. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Hunt, Thomas, 


Ag. 


A ckley, 


Hardin. 


Hyde, Edward, 


Ag. 


Washington, 


D. 0. 


Ireland, W. A., 


E. E. 


Rolfe, 


Pocahontas. 


Johnson, Dora, 


G. & D. S. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Johnson, Pearl, 


G & D. S. 


Ontario, 


Story. 


Jones, Ira W., 


C. E. 


Allison, 


Butler. 


Jones, John S., 


Ag. 


Manchester, 


Delaware. 


Kelsey, DeEtta, Sp 


G. & D. S. 


Perry, 


Dallas. 


Kempf, Geo., 


M. E. 


Victor, 


Iowa. 


Kinnick, F. B., 


Ag. 


Adel, 


Dallas. 


Kratz, A. M., 


Min. Eng. 


Sioux City, 


Woodbury. 


Landsburg, August, 


E. E. 


, Iowa City, 


Johnson. 


Lasher, A. C, 


E. E. 


Union Grove. 


Illinois. 



290 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Lawson, 0. L., 


Ag., 


Silver City, 


Mills. 


Lawton, John H., 


E. E., 


Newell, 


Buena Vista 


Lewis, James, 


Vet., 


McKinney, 


Texas. 


Lummis, G. M., 


Ag., 


Pleasant Hill, 


Missouri. 


Malley, Marie, G. 


& D. S., 


Marquisville, 


Polk. 


Marsh, Herbert, 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Martin, Walter, 


Vet., 


Mitchellville, 


Polk. 


Miller, A. A., 


Ag., 


Ogden, 


Boone. 


Miller, Geo. W., 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Moody, M. R., 


C. E. 


Greeley, 


Delaware. 


Moore, L. H., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Moorhouse, 0. V., 


M. E., 


Glidden, 


Carroll. 


McClain, F. L., 


E. E., 


Fairfield, 


Jefferson. 


McClure, Fay, 


C E., 


Ferry, 


Mahaska. 


McClure, Elizabeth, 


Sc. 


Bloomington, 


Illinois. 


McDonald, H. E., 


M. E., 


McKinney, 


Texas. 


McKimm, Effie, G. 


& D.S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


McKinney, R., 


E. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Nelson,. J. C, 


C. E., 


Harlan, 


Shelby. 


Norman, C. W., 


M. E., 


Omaha, 


Nebraska. 


Norton, C. W., 


Ag., 


Wilton Jc, 


Muscatine. 


Osborn, W. M., 


Sc, 


Rippey, 


Greene. 


Overholser, F. E., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Pew, Geo. V., 


M. E., 


Le Mars, 


Plymouth. 


Priem, A. E., 


Sc, 


St. Ansgar, 


Mitchell. 


Paimer, Henry, 


Sp., 


Cedar Falls, 


BiackHawk. 


Read, Homer, 


E. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Repp, Geo. V., 


Vet, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Rew, Frank, 


E E,, 


Corydon, 


Wayne. 


Reynolds, James E., 


Ag., 


Williamsburg 


, Iowa. 


Reynolds, M. C, 


E. E„ 


Carlisle, 


Warren. 


Ritzman, E. G., 


Ag., 


Maquoketa, 


Jackson. 


Roberts, Humphrey, 


Ag., 


Marathon, 


BuenaVista. 


Roland, C., 


C. E., 


Adel, 


Dallas. 


Rosenberger, M., 


Vet., 


Mitchellville, 


Polk. 


Rounds, Mary, G. 


& D. S., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Royce, Oscar, 


Ag., 


Monucello, 


Jones. 


Russell, L. W., 


Vet., 


Anamosa, 


Jones. 


Sampson, H. 0., 


Sc, 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo 


Scott, Nellie, G. 


& D. S., 


Ontario, 


Story. 


Sheldon, i^eLa, 


Ag., 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Shultis, Frank, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Smith, William W., 


Ag., 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Snyder, R., 


Vet., 


Dixon, 


Scott. 


opalding, Ed., 


E. E., 


Sioux City, 


Woodbury. 


Stageberg, Martin, 


M. E., 


Jewell, 


Hamilton. 


Starr, Nina, G. 


& D. S. 


Ames, 


Story. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE. 



291 



Starzinger, Otto, 


E. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Streeter, C. H., 


C. E., 


Cedar Falls, 


Blackhawk 


Tenney, Edgar, 


M. E., 


Ida Grove, 


Ida. 


Thomas, D. C, 


M. C, 


ColumbusCity, Louisa. 


Tillson, H. L., 


E. E., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Vanatta, Maud, 


G. & D. S., 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Van Pelt, H. G., 


Ag., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Waggoner, H. I., 


E. E. 


Primghar, 


O'Brien. 


Warden, Alice, 


G. & D. S., 


Melbourne, 


Marshall. 


Welch, Ira J., 


Sc., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Whisler, Arthur, 


E. E., 


Fairmount, 


Jasper. 


Williams, W. H., 


E. E., 


Ida Grove, 


Ida. 


Wilson, Wm. J., 


Ag., 


Earlham, 


Madison. 


Vk ood, Roscoe D., 


Sc, 


Prairie City, 


Jasper. 


Younie, Ethlyn, 


G. & D. S., 


Odebolt, 


Sac. 




SOPHOMORES. 




NAME. 


COURSE. 


TOWN. 


COUNTY. 


Alvord, Raymond, 


E. E„ 


Marcus, 


Cherokee. 


Anderson, F. S., 


M. E., 


Evanston, 


Illinois. 


Anderson, Hattie, 


G. & D. S., 


Jewell, 


Hamilton. 


Anderson, Isaac, 


E. E., 


Madrid, 


Boone. 


Austin, H. D., 


E. E., 


Prattsburg, 


New York. 


Austin, Roy G., 


C. E., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Bachman, W. C, 


E .E., 


Waterloo, 


Blackhawk. 


Barrett, R. L., 


Sp. Sc, 


Osage, 


Mitchell. 


Bean, G. M., 


M. E., 


Atlantic, 


Cass. 


Beasley, H. B., 


E. E., 


Marshalltown 


Marshall. 


Beebe, J. W., 


Min. Eng., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Bevan, W. A., 


Sc, 


Angus, 


Boone, 


Bishop, W. C., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story, 


Bishop, Howard, 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story, 


Bissell, Percy, 


M. E., 


Mt. - ernon, 


New York. 


Blaine, Lela R., 


Sc, 


CouncilBluffs, 


Pottawat'ie. 


Boardman, C. K., 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Borsheim, H. T., 


E. E., 


St. Ansgar, 


Mitchell. 


Boudinot, A. R., 


C. E., 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Brandt, Iva, 


G. & D. S., 


Mitchelville, 


Polk. 


Briley, Mollie, 


G. & D. S., 


Ontario, 


Story. 


Brinkerhoff, Moses 


E. E., 


Drayton, 


Audubon. 


Bristol], Ross, 


C. E., 


Cedar Rapids, 


Linn. 


Brock, W. I., 


E. E., 


CouncilBluffs, 


Pottawat'ie. 


Brockman, Harvey, 


Ag., 


Walcott, 


Scott. 


Brown, Frank L., 


C. E., 


Shelby, 


Shelby. 


Brown, Nellie, 


G. & D. S., 


Dexter, 


Dallas. 


Brown, 0. L., 


C. E., 


Lohrville, 


Calhoun. 


Brunnier, Henry J. 


C. E., 


Manning, 


Carroll. 



292 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Bruntlett, B. H„ 


C. E., 


Wyoming, 


Jones. 


Buchanan, R. E., 


Sc., 


Eagle Grove, 


Wright. 


Burton, Harry J., 


M. E., 


Colchester, 


Illinois. 


Caldwell, Fred, 


E. E., 


Agency, 


Wapello. 


Campbell, Claude, 


be, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Campbell, Colin F., 


Sp. Ag., 


Botna, 


Shelby. 


Carter, W. S., 


Ag., 


SiouxRapids. 


Buena Vista 


Cessna. Ethlyn, 


G. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Clyde, R. W., 


C. E., 


Osage, 


Mitchell. 


Coates, A. B., 


M. E., 


Clarinda, 


Page. 


Coffey, R. C, 


Sc, 


Prairie City, 


Jasper. 


Corlette, Glenn H., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Corlette, Bernice, 


G. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cotton, Ernest, 


C. E., 


Brayton, 


Audubon. 


Cretsinger, Myrtle, 


Sc, 


Coon Rapids. 


Carroll. 


Crouse, F. H., 


Sp. Ag., 


Dike, 


Gnmay. 


Curtis, C. E., 


C. E., 


Redfield, 


Dallas. 


Cutler, G. C, 


Ag., 


Carthage, 


Illinois. 


Cutler, F. G., 


Ag., 


Carthage, 


Illinois. 


Cutler, James L., 


Ag., 


Orchard. 


Mitchell. 


Danforth, H. G., 


Ag., 


Little Cedar, 


Mitchell. 


Danieis, Preston H 


E. E., 


Marion. 


Linn. 


Davis, Franc N., 


Sp., E. E., 


Sioux City. 


Woodbury. 


Dean, Harvey, 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Dickens, Katharine, 


G. & D. S., 


Hedrick. 


Keokuk. 


Dinsmore, Wayne, 


Ag., 


West Plains, 


Missouri. 


Doggett, W. H., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Dreher, Irving, 


M. E., 


Scranton. 


Greene. 


Eiler, D .W., 


Ag., 


SiouxRapids, 


Buena Vista 


Evans, A. L., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Finch, Elsie, 


Sc, 


Aurelia, 


Cnerokee. 


Fletcher, Frank, 


M. E., 


Worcester. 


Mass. 


Frost, Geo. E., 


E. E., 


Clear Lake, 


Cerro Gordo 


Galley, J. H., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Garberson, J. H., 


Sc, 


Alta, 


Buena Vista 


Gardner, S. B., 


Ag., 


Osage, 


Mitchell. 


Gaylord, L. T., 


C. E., 


Grinnell, 


Poweshiek. 


Gersback. Edward, 


C. E., 


Montezuma. 


Poweshiek. 


Gillette, Roy N., 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Gillispie, Leigh, 


E. E., 


Spencer, 


Clay. 


Gray, Charles, 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Oreene, Merritt, 


M. E., 


Marshalltowr 


, Marshall. 


Gribben, Ray, 


Ag., 


Minburn, 


Dallas. 


Hamerly .Fred, 


M. E., 


Denmark, 


Lee. 


Hanson, G. H., 


Rp. Sc, 


Odebolt, 


Sac. 


Hazelton, Park, 


E. E., 


Glidden, 


Carroll. 


Healy, Walter, 


E. E., 


Britt, 


Hancock. 


Heavenhill, Mark, 


E. E., 


Fox, 


minors. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE. 



293 



Hirschl, S. W., 


C. E., 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Hoag, Charles S., 


C. E., 


Muscatine, 


Muscatine. 


Hodgson, Harry, 


M. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Holden, A. C, 


E. E., 


Cherokee, 


Cherokee. 


Holder, J. A., 


Ag., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Holmes, Addie, G. 


& D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Howard. Harry, 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Howard, Charlotta, 


Sc., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Howard, G. P., 


Ag., 


New Provid'ce 


, Hardin. 


Jones, Clarence C, 


M. E., 


Creston, 


Union. 


Jones, Edward, 


E. E., 


Tracy, 


Minnesota. 


Jordan, J. W., 


Sc, 


Boone, 


Boone. 


King. M. L., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


btory. 


Kingkade, Eva, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Konigsmark. Mark F., 


Ag., 


Cedar Rapids, 


Linn. 


Labberton, G., 


E. E., 


Orange City, 


Sioux. 


Larson, E. V., 


Sc, 


Story City, 


Story. 


Leffler, G. V., 


Ag., 


Hillsboro, 


Henry. 


Lewis, 0. E., 


C. E., 


Montezuma, 


Poweshiek. 


Lewis, R. J., 


C. E., 


Denmark, 


Lee. 


Lincoln, Rush B., 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Lofstedt, 0. B., 


C. E., 


Rippey, 


Greene. 


Lyford, L. L., 


C. E., 


Manly, 


Worth. 


Me r net, M. L., 


Ag., 


Grundy Cent'r, Grundy. 


Miller, Delia, G. 


& D. S., 


Manchester, 


Deleware. 


Miller, 0. H., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Milnes, Genevieve, G 


& D. S., 


Kansas City, 


Missn uri. 


Minert, Roy T., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Moffit Robert, Min. Eng., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Moody, L. C, 


M. E., 


Greeley, 


Deleware. 


Morris, Charles, 


C. E., 


Corning, 


Adams. 


Morris, L. H., 


C. E., 


Corning, 


Adams. 


Morrison, Margaret, G 


& D. S., 


Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


Mosier, C. R.. 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Munroe, W. S., 


E. E„ 


West Chest'r, 


Washington 


McCampbell, A. K., 


C. E., 


Oskaloosa, 


Mahaska, 


McClure, W. E„ 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


McDonald, T. H., 


C. E., 


Montezuma, 


Poweshiek. 


McPerrin, R. E.. 


C. E., 


Montezuma, 


Poweshiek. 


McMillan, Roscoe, 


E. E., 


Vinton, 


Benton. 


Naylor, Harry, 


Sp. Ag., 


Clear Lake, 


Cerro Gordo 


Nelson, Fred, 


Ag., 


Toledo, 


Tama. 


Newcom, Oakes B., 


Ag., 


Odebolt, 


Sac. 


Newcom, R. B., 


Sc, 


Odebolt, 


Sac. 


Newell, Hugh, 


Ag., 


Columbus Jc 


Louisa. 


O'Hearn, J. L., 


C. E., 


Grinnell, 


Powkeshiek 


Okey. P. M., 


C. E., 


Prescott, 


Adams. 


Otis, H. R., 


E. E„ 


Ames, 


Story. 



\\ 



294 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Otis, Webb, 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Overholser, Alice, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Packer, W. T., 


Ag., 


Sherwood, 


Calhoun. 


Packer, M. E., 


Ag., 


Sherwood, 


Calhoun. 


Packer, Joseph, 


Ag., 


Marshal] town 


Marshall. 


Packer, Chas. R., 


Ag., 


Sherwood, 


Calhoun. 


Parker, Li. M., 


E. E., 


Marshalltown 


Marshall. 


Parks, P. C, 


Ag., 


Orangeburg, 


>s'o. Carol ina 


Pattie, Martha, 


Sc, 


Storm Lake, 


Buena Vista 


Peilsticker, F. A., 


E. E., 


Carroll, 


Carroll. 


Phillips, Paul, 


M. E., 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Pierce, Bertha, 


G. & D. S., 


Perry, 


Dallas. 


Pillsbury, C. D., 


Sc, 


Milford, 


Dickinson. 


Pishel, M. A., 


Min. Eng., 


Laurel, 


Marshall. 


Poage, L. S., 


M. E., 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Porter, G. L., 


Sp. Sc, 


Ft. AtKinson, 


Wisconsin. 


Puderbaugh, L. 0., 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Rapp, Edith, 


Sc, 


Osage, 


Mitchell. 


Raymond, L. B., 


Sc, 


Hampton, 


Franklin. 


Rhinehart, Estella 


G. & D. S., 


Dallas Center, 


Dallas. 


Ricksher, Wm„ 


E. E., 


Fairfield, 


Jefferson. 


Riley, Ethel, 


G. & D. S., 


Exira, 


Audubon. 


Rogers, Charlotta, 


Sp., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Ross, Ellis, 


Sc, 


Calumet, 


O'Brien. 


Roup, C .J., 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Rowat, Jas. A., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Rowe, Louise, 


G. & D. S., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Rubel, C. W., 


Ag., 


Kirkville, 


Wapello. 


Scanlon, J. B., 


C. E., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Schooley, C. 0., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Schuler, B. A., 


E. E., 


Garner, 


Hancock. 


Schwarting, Walter, E. E., 


Walcott, 


Scott. 


Scott, Hugh, 


E. E., 


Muscatine, 


Muscatine. 


Scranton, H. L., 


E. E., 


Gilmore City, 


Pocahontas. 


Shaff, J. 0.. 


Ag., 


Folletts, 


Clinton. 


Shields, John C, 


Sc, 


Allerton, 


Wayne. 


Shipman, C. E., 


C. E., 


West Liberty, 


Muscatine. 


Shoemaker, W. A., 


E. E., 


Marshalltown 


Marshall. 


Shreve, Earl 0., 


E. E., 


Charter Oak, 


Crawford. 


Shultis, Chester, 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Simpson, C. D., 


M. E., 


Wall Lake, 


Sac. 


Slater, Bird, 


G. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Smith, A. J., 


E. E., 


Corning, 


Adams. 


Smith, Clement, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story, 


Smith, H. P., 


E. E., 


Seymour. 


Wayne. 


Sperry, a. B., 


E. E., 


Grundy Centei Grundy. 


Starr, Nettie, 


G. & D. S., 


Maxwell, 


Story. 


Steiner, W. H., 


C. E., 


Aurelia, 


Cherokee. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE. 



295 



Stevens, Edith. 


Sc, 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Sumner. W. D., 


E. E., 


Ottumwa, 


Vvapello. 


Taggart, Laura, 


G. & D. S., 


State Center, 


Marshall. 


Tellier, H. 0., 


Ag., 


Humboldt, 


Humboldt, 


Terril, Katherine, 


G. & D. S.. 


Grand Jc, 


Louisa. 


Thornburg, Mark, 


Ag., 


Linden, 


Dallas. 


r l nrockmorton, C. G., Sp. E. E., 


Chariton, 


Lucas. 


Tibbetts, C. L., 


E. E., 


Toledo, 


Tama. 


Titus, Elsie, 


Sc. 


Grundy Center, Grundy. 


Torres, Gonzalo, 


Ag., 


Leon, 


Mexico. 


Tourgee, C. H., 


Ag., 


Arthur, 


Ida. 


Ulibarri, Ricardo, 


Ag., 


Leon, 


Mexico. 


Usry, Eldon, 


M. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Waggoner, Geo., 


E. E., 


Primghar, 


O'Brien. 


Wallace, B. R., 


C. E., 


Albia, 


Monroe. 


W'alter, C. D., 


C. E., 


Humboldt. 


Humboldt. 


Warren, Frank, 


M. E., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


W T atts, Alice, 


G. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Wells, Reine, 


Sc, 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Wickham, John Q., 


C. E., 


Zearing, 


Story. 


Wilbur, H. D., 


Sc, 


Marshalltown 


, Marshall. 


Williams, Chas. V. 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Wilnams, Harold 


R., Ag., 


Grandview, 


Louisa. 


Wilson, C. B., 


C. E., 


Cherokee, 


Cherokee. 


Woodard, C. W., 


M. E., 


Denison, 


Crawford. 


Woody, A. E.. 


M. E., 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Young, A. Li., 


E. E., 


Manson, 


Calhoun. 




FRESHMEN. 




NAME. 


COURSE. 


TOWN. 


COUNTY. 


Adams, Paul, 


Sc, 


Clinton, 


Clinton. 


Adamson, G. J., 


C. E., 


Iowa Falls, 


Hardin. 


Adamson, Arthur, 


Sc, 


Ankeny, 


Polk. 


Agg, T. R., 


E. E., 


Oskaloosa, 


Mahaska. 


Alford, Robert, 


E. E., 


Waterloo, 


Blackhawk 


Anderson, Abel, 


E. E., 


Lake City, 


Calhoun. 


Anderson, J. L„ 


E. E., 


Komstodt, 


*Sf. D. 


Anderson, Keo, 


G. & D. S., 


Jewell, 


Hamilton. 


Andrews, W. W., 


Ag., 


Franklin, 


Term. 


Anthony, Horace, 


C. E., 


Camanche, 


Clinton. 


Armstrong, E .0., 


Ag., 


Marne, 


Cass. 


Armstrong, C .L., 


E. E., 


Dyersville, 


Dubuque. 


Armstrong, Lucile 


, G. & D. S., 


Dyersville, 


Dubuque. 


Ashby, Horace P. 


Ag., 


Creston, 


Union. 


Ashby, John B., 


Ag., 


Creston, 


Union. 


Atherton, A. C, 


E. E., 


Muscatine, 


Muscatine. 


Atkinson, Ralph, 


E. E., 


Moorhead, 


Monona. 



<\ 



296 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Avey, H. T., 


M. E., 


Brockton, 


Taylor. 


Babbitt, H. K., 


C. E., 


Chicago, 


Illinois. 


Bagwiil, W. J., 


Ag., 


Millington, 


Illinois. 


Baker, Clyde, 


Ag., 


Britt, 


Hancook. 


Baxer, R. L., 


M. E., 


Columbus Jc 


, Louisa. 


Bannister, Cbase, 


Sp. C. E., 


Ottumwa, 


Wapello. 


Barclay, Paul, 


C. E., 


West Liberty, 


Muscatine. 


Barnes, W. A., 


Sp. Ag., 


St. Charles, 


Madison. 


Barrett, Donald C, 


C. E., 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo 


Bartholomew,Jeanette, G&DS., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Bechtle, C. R., 


Sp. Hort, 


LeMars, 


Plymouth. 


Beedle, Artbur, 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Bebler, C. R., 


Vet., 


Chicago, 


Illinois. 


Beisell, W. D., 


C. E., 


Traer, 


Tama. 


Belknap, Cole, 


Ag., 


Goldfield, 


Wright. 


Bell, Jasper S., 


Ag., 


Bellwood, 


Nebraska. 


Benes, Burton B., 


C. E., 


Fairfield, 


Jefferson. 


Blackwood, R. E., 


Sc, 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Bliss, R. K., 


Ag., 


Polen, 


Ringgold. 


Boardman, Glenn, 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Boiler, W. F., 


Sc, 


Muscatine, 


Muscatine. 


Bootb, N. P., 


C. E., 


Harlan, 


Shelby. 


Botbel, Frank, 


Ag., 


Corning, 


Adams. 


Botsford, Walter, 


Sp. E. E., 


Eureka, 


Adams. 


Bower, Herbert, 


Ag., 


Folletts, 


Clinton. 


Bradley, Roy, 


C. E„ 


RockRapids, 


Lyon. 


Bridger, L. J., 


E. E., 


Richland, 


Keokuk. 


Brothers, William, 


E. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Brown, Jno. J., 


Ag., 


Solon, 


Johnson. 


Brown, C. E. 


Sp. M. E., 


Prairie City, 


Jasper. 


Budge, Ben G., 


Sc, 


Cushing, 


Woodbury. 


Buell, Artbur, 


C. E., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Bullock, Chas. F., 


M .E., 


Ottumwa, 


Wapello. 


Burrows, J. M., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Byrnes, R. C, 


Vet., 


Iowa City, 


Johnson. 


Cain, Chester G., 


C. E., 


Scranton, 


Greene. 


Camblin, C. K., 


E. E., 


Atlantic, 


Cass. 


Cammack, A., 


M. E., 


Salem, 


Henry. 


Campbell, Foster, 


E. E., 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Campbell, Mabel, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Carlson, A. T., 


Ag., 


Farnhamv'e, 


Calhoun. 


Cassidy, Eva, Sp. 


G. & w. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Ccissidy, Robert, 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Caughey, R. I., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Caughey, J. W., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Caughey, J. A. I., 


Min. Eng., 


Ames, 


Story. 


uave, Harley, 


C. E., 


Correctionv'e, 


Woodbury. 


Cessna, Frank, 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 









STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE. 



297 



Chambers, Viola, 


Sp. Sc, 


Cheney, B. M., 


C. E., 


Clacey, Clara, 


Sp. Sc, 


Claybaugh, W. C, 


Ag., 


Clutter, A. C„ 


' E. E., 


Clyde, Mary E., 


Sp. Sc, 


Coates, A. B., 


tt. E., 


Coates, L. E., 


E. E., 


Cole, Mildred, 


Sc, 


Cole, L. J,, 


Sp. M. E., 


Collett, Ralph, 


Sc, 


Cook, C. R., 


M. E., 


Cook, A. L., 


M. E., 


Cooper R. N., 


E. E., 


Cooper, Ray D., 


Sp. E. E„ 


Courtney, Daisy.Sp. 


G. & D. S., 


Cowen, W. R., 


E. E., 


Cowgill, Ralph, 


Ag., 


Cox, R. L., 


C. E., 


Coy, Maud, 


Sp. Sc, 


Crawford, John B. 


Ag., 


Crawford, C. J., 


C. E., 


Creelman, L. C, 


C. E., 


Currie, Clare, 


C. E., 


Curtis, James, 


E. E., 


Curtis, E. Carlton 


C. E., 


Curtiss, Gertrude, 


Sc, 


Curtiss, Robert S., 


Sc, 


Cuthbert, Nellie,Sp. 


G. & D. S., 


Cutler, P. D., 


Ag., 


Dale, B. L., 


Sp. M. E., 


Dale, Claude, 


Ag., 


Danforth, J. M., 


Sp. M. E., 


Davidson, Jessie, 


G. & D. S., 


Davidson, Mary, 


G. & D. S., 


Davis, Dwight, 


Sc, 


Dean, Hattie, 


Sp., 


Dean, Aubrey, 


E. E., 


DeHarte, Mabel, 


Sc, 


Denmead. H. K., 


Ag., 


Deshler, Edwin, 


E. E., 


Diller, 0. H., 


Vet., 


Diller, C. R., 


Ag., 


Dodge, Geo. A., 


Vet., 


Dodge, M. V., 


C. E., 


Dolmage, Frank, 


Ag., 


Dow, C. A., 


Sp. E. E., 


Downey, Fred J., 


E. E., 



Waverly, 

Traer, 

Marble Rock, 

Greenfield, 

Farnhamv'e, 

Osage, 

Ames, 

Ames, 

Ames, 

Ames, 

Ida Grove, 

Oklah'a City, 

Des Moines, 

Saybrook, 

LaPorte City, 

Des Moines, 

Waukon, 

West Branch, 

Geneseo, 

Odebolt, 

Lohrville, 

New London, 

Mediapolis, 

Webster City, 

Carson, 

Atlantic, 

Nevada, 

Columbus Jc, 

Sioux Rapids, 

Carthage, 

Gilbert Stat'n, 

Chester Cent'r, 

Little Cedar, 

Monticello, 

Monticello, 

Ames, 

Mason City, 

Muscatine, 

Vernon, 

Marsh alltown, 

Ames, 

Dysart, 

Marshalltown, 

St. Ansgar, 

Des Moines, 

Victor, 

Garner, 

Garner, 



Bremer. 

Tama. 

Floyd. 

Adair. 

Calhoun. 

Mitchell. 

Story. 

Story. 

Story. 

Story. 

Ida. 

Oklahoma. 

Polk. 

Illinois. 

Blackhawk. 

Polk. 

Allamakee. 

Cedar. 

New York. 

Sac 

Calhoun. 

Henry. 

Des Moines. 

Hamilton. 

Pottawat' i 

Cass. 

Story. 

•Louisa. 

Buena Vista 

Illinois. 

Story. 

Poweshiek. 

Mitchell. 

Jones. 

Jones. 

Story. 

Cerro Gordo 

Muscatine. 

Van Buren. 

Marshall. 

Story. 

Tama. 

Marshall. 

Mitchell. 

Polk. 

Iowa. 

Hancock. 

Hancock. 






IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Drees, T. J., 


Sc, 


Carroll, 


Carroll. 


Dulitz, E. A., 


M. E., 


Charles City, 


Floyd. 


Eastman, W. R., 


Ag., 


Nashua, 


Chickasaw. 


Ebersole, Oral M., 


E. E., 


Toledo, 


Tama. 


Eck, Ralph, 


Min. Eng., 


Pleasant Pl'n 


Jefferson. 


Eddleman, M. R., 


Ag., 


Altoona, 


Polk. 


Ellis, J. A., 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Epley, Arthur C, 


Ag., 


Shellrock, 


Butler. 


Eshliman, Irvin, 


E. E., 


Glenwood, 


Mills. 


Evinger, Morris I., 


C. E., 


Hamburg, 


Fremont. 


Pair, D, H., 


Sp. C. E., 


Agency, 


Wapello. 


Parnham, R. A., 


Ag., 


Spencer, 


Clay. 


Faucett, Howard, 


Sp. Sc, 


Salem, 


Ohio. 


Fegles, D. B., 


C. E., 


LaPorte City, 


Blackhawk 


Fenstermaker, S., 


M. E., 


West Liberty, 


Muscatine. 


Fenton, Mary, 


Sp., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Fenton, Tom, 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Field, Dalton A., 


E. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Findley, Chas., 


Ag., 


Grimes, 


Polk. 


Folger, L. H., 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Ford, C. H., 


C. E., 


Esthervi'e, 


Emmet, 


Ford, Eugene, 


Min. Eng., 


Mitchellv'e, 


Polk. 


Forrest, James, 


C. E., 


Garner, 


Hancock. 


Forrest, Victor E., 


M. E., 


Tyndall, 


8. D. 


Foster, David C, 


E. E., 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Fox, H. S., 


M. E., 


Dallas Center, 


Dallas. 


Fraser, Jessie, 


G. & D. S., 


Paullina, 


O'Brien. 


Fraseur, Edith, Sp. 


G. &. D. S., 


Tipton, 


Cedar. 


Frechtling, Carl H 


Ag., 


Hamilton, 


Marion. 


Fuller, Thomas, 


Ag., 


Marshalltown 


Marshall. 


Fulton. W. L., 


C. E., 


Fairfield, 


Jefferson. 


Fyler, L. S., 


E. E., 


Shellrock. 


Butler. 


'Gabrilson, Carolyn 


Sc, 


NewHampt'n, 


Chickasaw. 


Garmen, Chas J., 


E. E., 


NewHampt'n, 


Chickasaw. 


George, Anna B., 


Sp. Sc, 


New Hampt'n 


, Chickasaw. 


George, Edith, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Gesell, Otto L., 


Ag., 


Elma, 


Howard. 


Gilchrist, Willard, 


Vet., 


Ontario, 


Story. 


Gilchrist, William 


A., Vet, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Gillette, Opal, 


Sc, 


Fostoria, 


Clay. 


Glidden, Fay C, 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Goble, Rose, 


G. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Graham, Ralph, 


Vet, 


Ames, 


Story- 


Gray, Percy, 


E. E., 


Jefferson. 


Greene. 


Green. Tom W., 


Sp., 


Sioux City, 


Woodbury. 


Griffith, Zaidee, 


G. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Groom, Wm. G, 


M. E., 


Clinton, 


Clinton. 


Grnbb, Victor, 


Ag., 


Panora, 


Guthrie. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE. 



299 



Gruver, T. E., 


Ag. 


Gowrie, 


Webster. 


Gunderson, M., 


Ag. 


St. Ansgar, 


Mitchell. 


Guthrie, Edward S., 


Ag. 


Coin, 


Page. 


Guthrie, J. C, 


Ag. 


Coin, 


Page. 


Haake, Walter, 


Vet. 


Griswold, 


Cass. 


Hall, C. W., 


Ag. 


Iowa City, 


Johnson. 


Hamm, Lisle, 


Ag. 


Tipton, 


Cedar. 


Handley, Ernest E., 


Ag. 


Carroll, 


Carroll. 


Hansen, Fred M., 


Ag. 


Goldfield, 


Wright. 


Hanson, Fred T., 


C. E. 


Forest City, 


Winnebago 


Hardebeck, 0. D., 


C. E. 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Hawn, John, 


Ag. 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Hazelton, Wm. R., 


E. E. 


Glidden, 


Carroll. 


Hatch, Lydia, 


Sp. 


Central-City, 


Linn. 


Heacock, Marguerite, 


Sp. 


Kingsley, 


Plymouth. 


Heisey, Chas. J., 


Ag. 


Monticello, 


Jones, 


Heffley, Aaron, 


Ag. 


Colo, 


Story. 


Hell, Henry, 


Vet. 


New Liberty, 


Scott. 


Hepburn, E. D., 


E. E. 


Madrid, 


Boone. 


Hibbard, Stella, G. 


& D. S. 


Paullina, 


O'Brien. 


Hicks, Howard, 


Ag. 


Hazlegreen, 


Delaware. 


Hiland, Clyde, 


E. E. 


Perry, 


Dallas. 


Hillman, Covell, 


M. E. 


Grand Jc, 


Greene. 


Hirons, F. G., 


Ag. 


Early, 


Sac. 


Hodgdon, C. Raymond 


, C. E. 


Grinnell, 


Poweshiek. 


Hofacre, F. T., 


Sc. 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


Hofman, R. C., 


Ag. 


Ottumwa, 


Wapello. 


Holden, Clare J., 


M. E. 


Montour, 


Tama. 


Holden, C. L., 


Ag. 


Cherokee, 


Cherokee. 


Hollenbeck, R. B., 


E. E. 


Casey, 


Guthrie. 


Homans, C. B., 


M. E. 


Fairfax, 


Linn. 


Hook, James W., 


M. E. 


Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


Hoppe, E. V., 


E. E. 


Hamburg, 


Fremont. 


Hoover, John, 


Sp. Ag. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Horlacher, F. S., 


Ag. 


Sterling, 


Illinois. 


Horn, A. R., 


E. E. 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Horton, Bessie, 


Sp. Sc. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Howard, Chelsea, 


Ag. 


NewProvid'ce 


Hardin. 


Hoyman, H., 


Vet. 


Stanwood, 


Cedar. 


Hughes, D. L., 


Sp. Ag. 


Columbus, Jc 


, Louisa. 


Hughes, May, 


Sc. 


Elburn, 


Illinois. 


Hughes, F. J., 


Ag. 


Omaha, 


Nebraska. 


Hurt, L. M., 


Vet. 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Hutchinson, C. J., 


Ag. 


Anderson, 


Fremont. 


Hutchison, J. LeRoy, 


Ag. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Hutchison, Fred, 


Ag. 


, Anderson, 


Fremont. 


Illian, A. L., 


Sp. Ag. 


, Davenport, 


Scott. 


Jacobs, T. D., 


E. E. 


, Mt. Auburn, 


Benton. 



300 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Jacobson, Barney C, 


C. E., 


Walnut, 


Pottawat'ie. 


Jeffs, Royal, 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Jenkins, W. S., 


Vet., 


Atlantic, 


Cass. 


Johnson, Ludwig P., 


Ag., 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Jorgenson, F. F., 


M. E., 


Vail, 


Crawford. 


Judisch, Geo., 


Sp. Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Kelsey, L. D., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Kennedy, Mae, G. 


& D. S., 


Collins, 


Story. 


Kennedy, Lena, G. 


& D. S., 


Collins, 


Story. 


Kenny, Etta E., G 


. & D. S., 


Early, 


Sac. 


Kershner, E. F., 


Ag., 


Dana, 


Greene. 


Keiser, Ralph, 


Vet, 


Atlantic, 


Cass. 


Kimball, Geo .M., 


E. E., 


Waterloo, 


Blackhawk. 


Kimball, R. P., 


Sp. Ag., 


Lamoille, 


Marshall. 


King, Lucy M., G. 


& D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


King, P. M., 


E. E., 


Bagley, 


Guthrie. 


Kintzley, Clyde, 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Kluckholm, 0. A., 


Sp. Ag., 


Odebolt, 


Sac. 


Kluckholm, Ellis, 


Sp. Ag., 


Odebolt, 


Sac. 


Knepper, John, 


Ag., 


Sheldon, 


O'Brien. 


Knickerbocker, C. J., 


E. E., 


Fairfax, 


Linn. 


Knowles, Harry, 


E. E., 


Kingsley, 


Plymouth. 


Kuck, Bertha, 


Sc, 


Charles City, 


Floyd. 


Lanphear,Fred, 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Larson, Carl W., 


Sc, 


Meltonville, 


Worth. 


Lasher, J. W., 


E. E., 


Cushing, 


Woodbury. 


Lathrop, H. A., 


C. E., 


Estherville, 


Emmet. 


Lawrence, J. A., 


E. E., 


Muscatine, 


Muscatine. 


Lee, Earl, 


E. E., 


Brooklyn, 


Poweshiek. 


Leefers, Otis, 


C. E., 


Tipton, 


Cedar. 


Leibrock, L. L., 


E. E., 


Elkader, 


Clayton. 


Lewis, F. G., 


Sp. Ag., 


Osceola, 


Clarke. 


Liebernecht, E. W., 


Ag., 


Letts, 


Louisa. 


Liggett, Fred M., 


C. E., 


Hamburg, 


Fremont. 


Lodwick, Gwylin, Min. Eng., 


Willard, 


Wapello. 


Lull, E. E., 


Vet., 


Ithaca, 


New York. 


Lund, Jennie, G. 


& D. S., 


St. Ansgar, 


Mitchell. 


Lynch, Wm. J., 


Ag., 


Green Mount' 


n,Marshall. 


Mace, R. P., 


Ag., 


Moulton, 


Appanoose. 


Madson, Matilda, 


Sp., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Mahanke, Clarence, 


E. E., 


Parkersburg, 


Butler. 


Maharg, Earl, 


Ag., 


Audubon, 


Audubon. 


Marsden, A., 


E. E., 


Humeston, 


Wayne. 


Marsh, Julia, 


Sp., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Marvick, Linnie, 


Sp., 


Story City, 


Story. 


Mason, F. C, 


E. E., 


Forest City, 


Winnebago. 


Massure, Mary, G 


& D. S., 


Redfield, 


Dallas. 


Matthews, C. G., 


E. E., 


Wayland, 


Henry. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE. 



801 



Mattison, Oliver, 


E. E., 


Oskaloosa, 


Mahaska. 


Mauldin, C. E., 


Vet., 


Grimes, 


Ala. 


Mayhew, Burleigh, 


Ag., 


Villisca, 


Montgomery 


Maynard, R. P., 


C. E., 


Traer, 


Tama. 


Merritt, Myrtle, 


Sp. Sc., 


Grundy Center, Grundy. 


Metcalf, Rolland, 


Sc, 


Correctionv'e, 


Woodbury. 


Miller, F. H., 


Sp. E. E., 


Clinton, 


Clinton. 


Miller, E. W., 


E. E., 


CouncilBluffs 


Pottawat'ie. 


Minert, Jas., 


M. E„ 


Waukon, 


Allamakee. 


Minkler, F. C, 


Sc, 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Mirick, I. A., 


E. E., 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


Mitts, B. L., 


C. E., 


Carroll, 


Carroll. 


Moffit, Mabel, 


G. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Morris, M. E., 


Vet., 


Riceville, 


Mitchell. 


Morris, Evan, 


Sc, 


Linn Grove, 


Buena Vista 


Mosher, Agnes, 


Sc, 


Sioux Rapids, 


Buena Vista 


Mosher, M. L., 


Ag., 


West Liberty, 


Muscatine. 


Mosier, Rachel, 


Sc, 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Munson, Margaret, 


G. & D. S., 


Thor, 


Humboldt. 


McCorkindale, A. C, Vet, 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo 


McCain, Philip, L., 


E. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


McClean, C. Ross, 


Ag., 


Union, 


Hardin. 


McClure, Myrtle, 


G. & D. S„ 


Dallas Center, 


Dallas. 


McCord, Dan, 


E. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


McElrath, W. W., 


Ag., 


Moville, 


Woodbury. 


McEwen, Geo. F., 


E. E., 


Manchester, 


Delaware. 


McGaughey, J. D., 


M. E., 


Kossuth, 


Des Moines. 


McGrew, E. S., 


Sp. Eng., 


Grand view, 


Louisa. 


McKay, Bruce, 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


McKinley, Fred, 


Sc, 


Clermont, 


Fayette. 


McMillan, A. R., 


Sp. Ag., 


Dunkerton, 


BlackHawk. 


McNall, C. A., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Nash, C. W., 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Naylor, E. C, 


Ag., 


Stratford, 


Hamilton. 


Nelson, Alice, 


Sp., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Nichols, S. S., 


M. E., 


Marshalltown 


Marshall. 


Niver, Lloyd, 


Sp. M. E., 


Luverne, 


Kossuth. 


Noble, Guy, 


E. E., 


Albia, 


Monroe. 


Olson, Lydia, 


G. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story, 


Oppenheimer, Ramsay, Ag., 


New York, 


New York. 


Ostrus, Joseph, 


Ag., 


Wiota, 


Cass. 


Overholser, Pearl, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story, 


Pacha, J. P., 


E. E., 


Pleasant Pl'n, 


Jefferson. 


Paddock, Flora, 


G & D. S., 


Grundy Centei 


*, Grundy. 


Page, M. L., 


M. E., 


Charles City. 


Floyd. 


Palmer, Warren, 


Ag., 


Wellman, 


Washington 


Patterson, Wm. J., 


M. E., 


Leighton, 


Mahaska. 


Patton, Ruby, 


Sc, 


Dexter, 


Dallas. 



302 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Patton, T. J., C. E., 

Paulger, L. H., Sc, 

Paxton, I. B., Vet, 

Payne, Rossell, Vet., 

Peck, Walter, M. E., 

Pendray, Edward, E. E., 

Perry, Frank, ■ Sc, 

Peshak, Irving, Sp. Ag., 

Peterson, L., Ag., 

Peterson, G. C, C. E., 
Peterson, Chester A., E. E., 
Pettinger, Celestine, G. & D. S., 
Phillips, Walter E., Min. Eng., 

Pike, Charles, Ag., 

Pilisbury, H. S., Sc, 

Plumley, H. P., E. E., 

Powell, A. L., Ag., 

Prather, C. M., E. E., 

Proctor, Glenn, J., C. E., 
Prouty .Helen, G. & D. S., 

Quertermous, R. C, C. E., 

Rae, Eva, Sc, 

Rapp, C. A., Vet., 

Rasmussen, Fred, Ag., 

Read, Russell, Vet., 

Read, George, E. E., 

Reading, Chas. E. E., 

Reese, Edd, E. E., 

Reinholdt, J. H., C. E., 

Reinert, Charles, Ag., 

Reinhart, M. J., C. E., 

Rich, Ernest, E. E., 

Ricker, F. H., E. E., 

Rieke, F., Ag., 

Roach, Frank, Vet., 

Roberts, G. A., Ag., 

Robey, F. C, E. E., 

Roy, Frank, E. E., 

Rundall, Mabel, Sc, 

Sage, A.W., M. E., 

Sandven, M., Sc, 

Schiele, Arthur, Ag., 

Schipfer, L. A., Sc, 

Schwab, J. W., Ag., 
Schwarting.Martha, G. & D. S., 

Scott, A. B., E. E., 

Scott, E. E., Ag., 

Scott, C. R., Ag., 



Dexter, Dallas. 
New Hartford, Butler. 

Ames, Story. 

Ames, Story. 

Ottumwa, Wapello. 

Oskaioosa, Mahaska. 

Ames, Story. 

Plymouth. Cerro Gordo 

Algona, Kossuth, 

Harlan, Shelby. 

Slater, Story. 

Cumberland, Cass. 

Keokuk, Lee. 

Papillion, $. D. 

Milford, Dickinson. 

Rockford, Floyd. 

Folletts, Clinton. 

Ames, Story. 

Fairydale, Illinois. 

Humboldt. Humboldt, 

Muscatine, Muscatine. 

Sioux Rapids, Buena Vista 

Shannon City, Union. 
Petersheden, Eels, Denm'k. 

Ames, Story. 

Elburn, Illinois. 

Adaza, Greene. 

Des Moines, Polk. 

Manning, Carroll. 

Davenport, Scott. 

Oto, Woodbury- 

Newton, Jasper. 

Grinnell, Poweshiek. 

Blairstown, Benton. 

Maquoketa, Jackson. 

Marathon, Buena Vista 

Waukon, Allamakee. 

LeRoy, Minnesota. 

Rodman, p a lo Alto. 

Denison, Crawford. 

Thor, Humboldt. 

Bluegrass, Scott. 

Sigourney, Keokuk. 

Stilson, Hancock. 

Walcott, Scott. 

Shelby, Shelby. 

Marathon, Buena Vista 

Elwell, Story, 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE. 



303 



Scott, R. S., 


E. E., 


Secor, E. L., 


E. E., 


Secor. A. J., 


Ag., 


Severance. G.. Sp. 


G. & D. S., 


Sharp, Walter, 


Vet., 


Shinier, Fred L., 


E. E., 


Shingledecker, C, 


E. E., 


Simpson, Geo. P., 


M. E., 


Skrable, Frank L., 


Vet., 


Blutz, C. S., 


E. E., 


Smith, Claude W., 


C. E., 


Smith, D. D., 


M. E., 


Smith, Howard. 


E. E., 


Smith, Irving R., 


M. E., 


Smith, L. M., 


Ag., 


Smith, M. L., 


E. E., 


Smith, Stuart, 


Ag., 


Smith, W. L., 


Ag., 


Spangler, Fred, 


Ag., 


Stephens, Lola, 


Sc, 


Stephenson, Wade, 


M. E., 


Sterns, Mabel, 


Sc, 


Sterns, Don, 


Sp., 


Stevens, Vern V., 


M. E., 


Stickford. A. H., 


Ag., 


Stinson, Robert S 


Ag., 


Stockdale, Guy, 


Ag., 


Stocum, a. P., 


E. E., 


Stoops, W. C 


C. E., 


Stouder, K. W., 


Ag., 


Stout, E. A., 


Ag., 


Stoufer, D. B., 


M. E., 


Stuart, A. A., 


Ag., 


Stuhler, Katherine, 


G. & D. S.. 


Sudlow, F. E., 


E. E., 


Sullivan, F. E., 


Ag., 


Swem, A. R., 


Sp. M. E., 


Taylor, F. F., 


M. E., 


Tener, W. I ., 


Ag., 


Thomas, Elbert, 


Ag., 


Thomas, H. F., 


E. E., 


Thompson, Winifred, G.&D.S., 


Tillotson. Edwin, 


E. E., 


Tooley, Etta. G 


. & D. S., 


Tooley, Belle. 


G. & D. S., 


Tracy, Robert, 


E. E., 


Tracy, Paul, 


Min. Eng., 


Tremaine. Hugh, 


C. E., 



Glidden, Carroll. 

Melbourne, Marshall. 

Melbourne, Marshall. 
Grundy Center,Grundy. 

Montezuma, Poweshiek. 

Brooklyn, Poweshiek. 

Audubon, Audubon. 

Nevada, Story. 

Elberon, Tama. 

Galva, Ida. 

Ames, Story. 

Sioux City, Woodbury. 

Nashua, Chickasaw. 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Clinton, Clinton. 

Liscomb, Marshall. 

Monticello, Jones. 

CouncilBluffs Poitawat'ie. 

Dallas Center, Dallas. 

Lohrville, Calhoun. 

Lohrville, Calhoun. 
SteamboatRockHardin. 

Humboldt, Humboldt. 

Dubuque. Dubuque. 

Garnavillo, Clayton. 

Marion, Linn. 

Walcott, Scott. 

Sanborn, O'Brien. 

West Liberty, Muscatine. 

Des Moines, Polk. 

Stout, Grundy. 

Des Moines, folk. 

Ames, Story. 

Monticello, Jones. 

Newton, Jasper. 

Elma, Howard. 
Cedar Rapids, Linn. 

Algona. Kossuth. 

Brevard, No. Carolina 
GreenMount'n, Marshall. 

Rolfe, Pocahontas. 

Cambridge, Story. 

Inwood, Lyon. 
New Hampton, Chickasaw. 
New Hampton, Chickasaw. 

Belle Plaine, Benton. 

Ames, Story. 

Eagle Grove, Wright. 



v\ 



304 



IOWA STATE COILEUE. 



Tripp, Floyd C, Ag., 

Trostc, Geo., Ag., 

Trotter, Irvina, Sp. G. & D. S., 

Truman, Walter, Sp. C. E., 

Tumbleson, G. A., Sc., 

Turner, Myrtle, Sp., 

Turner, H. E., C. E., 

Van Duzer, Guy, Sc, 

Van Duzer, Pearl, G. & D. S., 

Van Duzer, F. R., Vet, 

Van Houton, A. W., C. E., 

Van Pelt, D. H. Ag., 

Vibber, H. R., Sp. Sc, 

Vogel, J. E., E. E., 

Walker, Ruth, G. & D. S., 

Wallace, Guy P., M. E., 

Walton, P. J., E. E„ 

Warden, Marvin, C. E., 

Wark, R. S., C. E., 

Warren, Carroll C, C. E., 
Washburn, Anna, Sp. G&D.S., 

Watson, E. B., Ag., 

Webber, Chas. A., Ag., 

Weir, Wm. E., Ag., 

Western, Clarence A., Ag., 

Wheeler, W. H., E. E., 

White, Warren, E. E., 

White, H. C, Min. Eng., 

White, J. F., Ag., 

White, Ed., C. E., 

Wicbman, John, E. E., 
Wiley, Erma , G. & D. S., 

Wilhelm, C. V., Sp. E. E., 

Wilhelm, Arthur, C. E., 

Wilkes, R. C, C. E., 

Williams, Mile C. E., 

Williams, L. A., M. E., 

Williams, Loretta, Sc, 

Wilson, Fred W., E. E., 

Wilson, R. E., Ag., 

Winegar, Roy E., Ag., 

Wood, Fred, M. E., 

Woodman, Lois, Sp. Sc, 

Woodard, D. C, E. E., 
Woodman, Forest E., M. E., 
Woodruff, Theressn, O.&D.S., 

Woodruff, C. W., C. E., 

Woodruff, B. B., M. E., 



Ruthven, Palo Alto. 

Des Moines, Polk. 

Shell Rock, Butler. 

Iowa Falls, Hardin. 

Havelock, Pocahontas. 

Marne, Cass. 

Marne, Cass. 

Ames, Story. 

Ontario, Story. 

Ontario, Story. 

Lenox, Taylor. 

Des Moines, Polk. 

Grand View, Louisa. 

Stromsburg, Nebraska. 

Osage, Mitchell. 
Dallas Center, Dallas. 

Washington, Washington 

Vancleve, Marshall. 

Adair, Adair. 

Knoxville, Marion. 

West Union, Fayette. 

Ames, Story. 

Wapello, Louisa. 

Wheeling, W. Virginia, 

Beaconsfield, Ringgold. 

Madrid, Boone. 

Delta, Keokuk. 

Cedar Rapids, Linn. 

Perry, Dallas. 
Correctionville.Woodbury. 

Walcott, Scott. 

Castana, Monona. 

Conrad, Grundy. 

Muscatine, Muscatine. 

Folletts, Clinton. 

Manly, Worth. 

Postville, Allamakee. 

Ames, Story. 

Atlantic, Cass. 

BerLn, Tama. 

Weste:ate, Fayette. 

Sac City, Sac. 

Ames. Story. 

Des Moines, Polk. 

Ames, Story. 

Ames, Story. 

Glenwood, Mills. 

Ames, Story. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLIDE. 



305 



Woolley, Ben, 


Ag., 


High Point, 


Decatur. 


Wright, John G., 


Sp. C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Wright, A. E., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Wyman, Arthur, 


M. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Wymore, Pearl, 


Sp. G.&D.S., 


Barnes, 


Mahaska. 


Zanke, G. J., 


E. E., 


Algona, 


Kossuth. 




ACADEMIC. 




NAME. 


COURSE. 


TOWN. 


COUNTY. 


Abbey, C. R., 


E. E., 


Garner, 


Hancock. 


Acheson, A. C., 


M. E., 


Maxwell, 


Story. 


Adamson, Oliver, 


Sc., 


Ankeny, 


Polk. 


Akin, Lee, 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Armstrong, C. L., 


C. E., 


Dyersville, 


Dubuque. 


Austin, H. C., 


E. E., 


Manchester, 


Delaware. 


Barton, Mabel, 


G. & D. S., 


Kirkman, 


Shelby. 


Bechtelheimer, A. 


E., C. E., 


Oto, 


Woodbury. 


Beedle, Ida, 


Sc, 


Renwick, 


Humboldt. 


Behrens, Henry J. 


, Sp. M. E., 


Volga City, 


Clayton. 


Benesh, V., 


Sc, 


Vining, 


Tama. 


Bisbee, Myrtle, Sp 


G. & D. S., 


Castana, 


Monona. 


Boyce, G. W., 


Sc, 


Newell, 


BuenaVista 


Boynton, G. W., 


C. E., 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Bright, C. L., 


M. E., 


Otterville, 


Buchanan. 


Brown, H. T., 


C. E., 


Ottumwa, 


Wapello. 


Brown, Grace, 


Sp., 


Rolfe, 


Pocahontas. 


Cairns, Luella, 


G. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Callahan, B. 0., 


Sp. Eng., 


Chariton, 


Lucas. 


Campbell, Fae, 


Sp., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Campbell, J. Roy, 


Ag., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Carey, J. W., 


Min. Eng., 


Keb, 


Wapello. 


Carr, R. E., 


E. E., 


Centerville, 


Appanoose. 


Chandler, Fred, 


M. E., 


Marengo, 


Iowa. 


Chattin , Grace, 


Sp., 


Anthon, 


\v oodbury. 


Chittenden, Walter R., E. E., 


Marshall, 


Minnesota. 


Claussen, Carl, 


Sp. M. E., 


Ogden, 


Boone. 


Clements, Carl W., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cole, W. B., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Colyer, R. W., 


Sp. Eng., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Creswell, Clifford, 


Ag., 


Wapello, 


Louisa. 


Curl, Dale M., 


E. E. r 


Defiance, 


Shelby. 


Cutler, M. W., 


M. E., 


Nora Springs, 


Floyd. 


Dean, A. C, 


Sc, 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Dickey, John, 


Ag., 


Goose Lake, 


Clinton. 


Dickinson, Florence, G.&D. S., 


Havelock , 


Pocahontas. 


Dicus, John, 


Sc, 


Griswold, 


Cass. 


Dixon, Guy, 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 



306 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Doleschek, Charles 


Sp. Ag. 


Diagonal, 


Ringgold. 


Dotts, C. F., 


Ag. 


Bethlehem, 


Wayne. 


Dotts, H. E., 


Ag. 


Bethlehem, 


Wayne. 


Doty, H. L., 


Sc. 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Drebing, Percy F., 


M. E. 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Drug, J. L., 


C. E. 


Stratford, 


Hamilton. 


Drug, Louise, 


G. & D. S. 


Stratford, 


Hamilton. 


Eastwood, George, 


Ag. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Eaton, Henry, 


C. E. 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Eckhart, Oscar, 


Sp. M. E. 


Guttenberg, 


Clayton. 


Ege, C. R., 


C. E. 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo 


Eichelsdorfer, A., 


Min. Eng. 


Rock Island, 


Illinois. 


Eikelberg, W. J., 


Ag. 


Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


Elsberry, T. W., 


C. E. 


Lehigh, 


Webster. 


Ellis, Mary L., 


G. & D. S. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Ellis, Willis, 


E. E. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Ellis, John, 


Sp. M. E. 


Rock Rapids, 


Lyon. 


Ettinger, Victor, 


Sp. Eng. 


Waterloo, 


Blackhawk. 


Evans, W. R., 


M. E. 


New London, 


Henry. 


Everson, 0. M., 


Sp. Ag. 


Rolfe, 


Pocahontas. 


Fausch, Hannah, 


Sc. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Flickinger, L. L., 


E. E. 


Elwell, 


Story. 


Fosse, 0. A., 


E. E. 


Ridge way, 


Winneshiek. 


Frevert, Gustav, 


Ag. 


Odebolt, 


Sac. 


Frey, Earl, 


E. E. 


Pecatonica, 


Illinois. 


Furrow, Ray, 


C. E. 


Tripoli, 


Bremer. 


Gambell, Floyd R. 


Sc. 


Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


Garmire. Chas. T., 


E. E. 


Audubon, 


Audubon. 


Garver, N. B., 


C. E. 


Farmington, 


Van Buren. 


Gatchell, Dave, 


Sc. 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Gearheart, F. C.. 


C. E. 


Jewell, 


Hamilton. 


Gilchrist, Jennie, 


G. & D. S. 


Ontario, 


Story. 


Glass, Dale, 


M. E. 


Winfield, 


Henry. 


Goulden. R. S., 


E. E. 


CouncilBluffs, 


Pott'ttamie. 


Green, F. C., 


E. E. 


Mondamin, 


Harrison. 


Greer, Floy, 


G. & D. S. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Gray, Alex, 


M. E. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Hansen, Elmo, 


C. E. 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Hardy, Ross, 


Sp. C. E. 


Winfield. 


Henry. 


Hawortb, G. F., 


Sc. 


Ackwortb, 


Warren. 


Heacock, Lillie, 


G. & D. S. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Heberling, C. A., 


C. E. 


Atalissa, 


Muscatine. 


Hedrick, Marian, 


Sc. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Henderson, Genevieve, Sc. 


, Milford, 


Dickinson. 


Herrick, George D. 


E. E. 


Sac Citv, 


Sac. 


Hidinger, LoRoy, 


C. E. 


Prescott, 


Adams. 


Higgins, J am os, 


Sp. Ag. 


Grand June, 


Louisa. 


Higgins, Nellie, 


Sp. 


Grand June, 


Louisa. 



-nni'NIS <>1 TUK COI.LKCK. 



307 



Hill. F. E., 


Sp., 


Clear Lake, 


Cerro Gordc 


Hinkley, W .H., 


Sc, 


Havelock, 


Pocahontas. 


Hornbaker, C. Merle, 


M. E., 


Bonaparte, 


Van Buren. 


Houser, B. B., 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Howe, Fred, 


M. E., 


Radcliffe, 


Hardin. 


Humbert, Eugene, 


Ag., 


Corning, 


Adams. 


Hurd, Elmer 


E. E., 


Cherokee, 


Cherokee. 


Ickis ,Lynn, 


E. E., 


Creston, 


Union. 


His, Elsie, Sp. G. 


& D. S., 


Pilot Mound, 


Boone. 


Irvine, Jere, 


M. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Johnson, Alia, G 


& D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Johnson, David F., 


E. E., 


Red Oak, 


Page. 


Johnson, Arthur B., 


E. E., 


Marcus, 


Cherokee. 


Jones, Arthur, 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Keith, Elsie, G. 


& D. S., 


Goldfield, 


Wright. 


Kenny, Guy a., 


E. E., 


Early, 


Sac. 


Kibby, A. S„ 


M. E., 


Audubon, 


Audubon. 


Kirby, Edward, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Kirby, Edna, G. 


& D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Knepper, Charles. 


C. E., 


Sheldon, 


O'Brien. 


Knox, Walter, 


M. E., 


Marcus, 


Cherokee. 


Koch, Alma, G. 


& D. S., 


Keystone, 


Benton. 


Kock, William, 


M. E., 


Akron, 


Plymouth. 


Krebs, v. illiam H., 


Sp., 


Cedar Rapids 


Linn. 


Kuhn, W. H., 


E. E., 


Councilbiuffs, 


Pott'ttamie. 


Langland, George, 


E. E., 


Marshall, 


Minnesota. 


Larson, Christine, Sp. 


G.&D.S., 


Spencer, 


Clay. 


Larson, C. E., 


M. E., 


Stratford, 


Hamilton. 


Lawrence, Clark W., 


Sp. Ag., 


Bradciyville, 


Page. 


Leonard, Nathan B., 


C. E., 


Cedar Rapids 


Linn. 


Lighter, Homer, 


E. E., 


Hartley, 


O'Brien. 


Lind, John, 


Sp. Ag., 


Rolfe, 


Pocahontas. 


Lindmark, Alpha, 


Sp., 


Stratford, 


Hamilton. 


Lingree, 0. E., 


M. E., 


Gowrie, 


Webster. 


Loring, W. V., Sp. M. E., 


Indianola, 


Warren. 


Ludemann, Emma, G 


& D. S., 


Kesley, 


Butler. 


Lyman, C. C, 


C. E., 


Cushing, 


Woodbury. 


Mabie, Ira P., 


M. E., 


Freeman. 


Cerro Gordo 


Madson, B., 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Madson, Emma, 


Sp., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Malone ; C. E., 


E. E., 


Wiota, 


Cass. 


Martin, J. A., 


E. E., 


Osage, 


Mitchell. 


Martin, Roy, 


Sp., 


Ames, 


tetory. 


Meiser, Frank, 


Ag., 


Solon, 


Jonnson. 


Melhus, Irvine, 


Sc, 


Ellsworth, 


Hamilton. 


Miller, Charles W., 


E. E., 


Bloomfield, 


Davis. 


Miller, Harry, 


E. E., 


CouncilBluffs, 


Pott'tcamie. 


Moffiit, T. C, 


Ag., 


Clarence, 


Cedar. 



308 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Moore, H. I., C. E., 
iviorrison, Clyde, Sp. M. B., 
Morton, Blanche, Sp. G.&D.S., 

Moses, Mabel, G.&D. S., 

Muffley, Glenn, M. E., 

McBurney, W. S., M. E., 

McCarthy, Howard, M. E., 
McConnell, Ernest V., M. E., 

McCormick, C. M., E. E. 

McCullough, T. R., E. E., 

McGregor, A. M., M. E., 

McGrath, H. H., C. E., 

Mcx^erral, Birt, Ag., 
Nash, Nellie, G. & D. S., 

Nash, J. A., Sp., 

Natn, Charles, M. E., 

Near, D. H., C. E., 

Northup, C. A., Vet., 

Nelson, Max, E. E., 
Novak, Antoinette, Sp. Sc, 
Novak, L. A., Sp. E. E., 

Nye, Henry, E. E., 

Otto, I. E., Sp., 

Packer, H., M. E., 

Page, A. M., Vet., 

Pain, C. E., C. E., 

Palmer, Roy, C. E., 

Parsons, Daisy, Sc, 

Perrin, Philip, Sc, 

Perrin, A. C, M. E., 

Peterson, Carl A., E. E., 

Pierce, E. H., E. E., 

Pingrey, Gertrude, Sc, 

Pingrey, Fred, Ag., 
Pieggenkuhle, Alvina, Sp. G. & 
Poppingo, Jacob, Sp. M. E., 

Powell, A. C, Ag., 

Prather, R. C, E. E., 

Pride, Elsie, Sc, 
Prime, v^era, G. & D. ri., 

Proper, Louis, E. E., 

Railsback, G., E. E., 

Ritland, Louis J., Sc, 

Rolfs, Inola, Sp., 

Ross, Fred R., C. E., 

Rowell, Ross E., E. E., 

Rubel, W. G., M. E., 

Rush, H. S., E. E., 



Hedrick, Keokuk, 

indianoia, Warren. 

Boone, Boone. 

Ames, Story. 

Sumner, Bremer. 

Churdan, Greene. 

Ames, Story. 

Independence, Buchanan. 

Tipton, Cedar. 

Rock Valley, fcuoux. 

Rockiord, Illinois. 

Ames, Story. 
GreenMountainiu.arsnail. 

Ames, Story. 

Ames, Story. 

Bouton, Dallas. 

Webster City, Hamilton. 

Ida Grove, Ida. 

Pomeroy, Calhoun. 

Cedar Rapids, Linn. 

Conover, Winneshiek. 

Ames, Story. 

Mapieton, Monona. 

Marshalltown, Marshall. 

Ida Grove, Ida. 

Burt, Kossuth. 

Tripoli, Bremer. 

Ames, Story. 

Mapieton, Monona. 

Mapieton, Monona. 

Red Oak, Montgomery 

Emporia, Kansas. 

Coon Rapids, Carroll. 

Coon Rapids, Carroll. 

D. S., Hawkeye, Fayette. 

Rock Rapids, Linn. 

Washta, Cherokee. 

Griswold, Cass. 

Ames, Story. 

Denver, Colorado. 

Bonaparte, Van Buren. 

Palo. Linn. 

Roland, Story. 

LeClaire, Scott. 

Oelwein, Fayette. 

Ruthven, Palo Alto. 

Ames, Story. 

Colfax, Jasper. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE. 



309 



Salinger, Benjamin, 


Sc, 


Carroll, 


Carroll. 


Salinger, L. H., 


Sc, 


Carroll, 


Carroll. 


Sauers, Raymond, 


Sc, 


Ida Grove, 


Ida. 


Saunders, Wm. E., 


E. E., 


Neptune, 


Plymouth. 


Sawyer, Roy C, 


C. E., 


Cushing, 


Woodbury, 


Schneider, C. J., 


Sp. Ag., 


Granaview, 


Linn. 


Schreiber, Walter A., 


E. E., 


Charlton, 


Lucas. 


Schulte, Louise, G. 


& D. S., 


Clayton, 


Clayton, 


Scott, Gertrude, Sp. G 


. & D. S., 


Traer, 


Tama. 


Seeley, Burton, 


M. E., 


Algona, 


Kossuth. 


Shaw, Winifred, 


Sc, 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Shaw, Genevieve, 


Sc, 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Shawvan, John, 


Sc, 


Denison, 


Crawford. 


Shinkle, Ira B., 


C. E., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Shull, L. C, 


C. E., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Shultz, Jesse T., 


M. E., 


Richland, 


Keokuk. 


Skelly, Frank, 


E. E., 


DeWitt, 


Clinton. 


Sifford, Ross, 


E. E., 


Wall Lake, 


Sac 


Smith, Earl, 


E. E., 


Clinton, 


Clinton. 


Smith, Mollie, 


Sc, 


Clemons, 


Marshall. 


bmith, Leonard, 


E. E., 


Havelock, 


Pocahontas 


Smith, Wendall, 


Sp. Sc, 


Brayton, 


Audubon. 


Solomonson, Clifton, 


Ag., 


Estherville, 


Emmet. 


Sordon, Roy E., 


M. E., 


Thornburg, 


KeokuK. 


Stanard, C. D., 


C. E., 


NorthEnglish 


Iowa. 


Stevens, Imogene, G. 


& D. S., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Stratford, A. E., 


C. E., 


Rockford, 


Floyd. 


Struck, Herbert, 


M. E., 


Hubbard, 


Hardin. 


Sullivan, R. J., Min. Eng., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Swaney, F. J. 


E. E., 


Manning, 


Carroll. 


Swaney, Grace, 


Sc, 


Dedham, 


Carroll, 


Thul, William, 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Tomlinson, Willet, 


M. E., 


Lamoilie, 


Marsnall. 


Tostenson, M. T., 


C. E., 


LeGrande, 


Marshall. 


Towne, <J. E., 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Tuttle, Theodore, 


E. E., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Ulrey, "Wava, 


Sc, 


Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


Vogel, J. E., 


E. E., 


Stromsburg, 


Nebraska. 


Walkey, C. B., Sp. M. E., 


Freeport, 


Illinois. 


Walker, R. D., 


E. E., 


Tacoma, 


Washington. 


Walker, W. J., 


M. E., 


Paton, 


Greene. 


Waller, Homer B. 


Eng., 


Pioneer, 


Humboldt. 


Walters, Blanche, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Warnock, E. S., 


M. E., 


Evanston, 


Illinois. 


Warrington, Winfield, 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Watts, Thomas, 


Ag., 


Goose Lake , 


Clinton. 


Waugh, Erie, 


C. E., 


Roland, 


Story. 


Weaver, Anna, Sp. G. 


& D. S., 


May City, 


Osceola. 



310 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Welch, G. V., 


Sp 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Wells, C. W., 


Sp. 


C. E., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Wells, R. J., 




Eng., 


SteamboatRoc Hardin. 


Wheat, LeRoy, 


Sp. 


M. E., 


Mt. Vernon, 


Linn. 


Wilken, Fred, 




M. E., 


Atlantic, 


Cass. 


Widner, Jas. H., 




M. E., 


Humansville, 


Missouri. 


Wilson, Mary M., 




Sc, 


Livingston, 


Appanoose 


Wilson, T. J., 




C. E., 


Columbia, 


Marion. 


Worswick, A. W., 




Ag., 


Spencer, 


Clay. 


Wolfe, Edward, 




C. E., 


DeWitt, 


Clinton. 


Wright, L. G., 




C. E., 


Chariton, 


Lucas. 


Wynkoop, 0. L., 




C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Zimmerman, Phoebe 




Sp., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Zirbell, C. J., 




M. E., 


Montezuma, 


Poweshiek 


Zordrager, Peter, 




C. E., 


Hosper, 


Sioux. 



MUSIC STUDENTS. 



NAME. 


TOWN. 


COUNTY 


Beardshear, Metta, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Brandt, Ora, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Brown, Grace, 


Rolfe, 


Pocahontas 


Clasey, Clara, 


Marble Rock, 


Floyd. 


Drug, Louise, 


Stratford, 


Hamilton. 


Dunphy, Raymond, 


Spokane, 


Washington, 


Giddings, Mabel, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Halley, Bernice, 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Hanson, Mary, 


Ellsworth, 


Hamilton. 


Hanson, W. A., 


Ellsworth, 


Hamilton. 


Hawthorne, Bessie, 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Heacock, Marguerite, 


Kmgsiey, 


Plymouth. 


lies, Elsie, 


Pilot Mound, 


Boone. 


Jonnson, Daisy, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Jones, Ward, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Larsen, Christine, 


Spencer, 


Clay. 


Marsh, Julia, 


Ames, 


Story. 


JViarvick, Linnie, 


Story City, 


Story. 


Miller, Claude, 


Ames, 


Story. 


McConnell, Clara, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Novak, Antoinette, 


Cedar Rapids 


Linn. 


Pleggenkuhle, Alvina, 


West Union, 


Fayette. 


Renne, Blanch, 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Scott, Gertrude, 


Traer, 


Tama. 


Scott, Ada, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Sterns, D. M., 


Humboldt, 


Humboldt. 


Winans, Mrs., 


Slater, 


Story. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE. 



311 



DAIRY. 



NAMi:. 

Atwood, L. L., 
Back, James, 
Barden, W. J., 
Barlow, Iver, 
Bates, E. J., 
Beals, C. R., 
Belknap, * . C, 
Billings, F. C., ' 
Boice, W. T., 
Burt, Ray, 
Butler, Peter, 
Byrne, Geo., 
Challender, R. P., 
Cheney, James, 
Christenson, Adolph, 
Clausen, Hans, 
Cosgrove, M. D., 
Daws, J. L., 
Emerson, J. A., 
Fjetland, Gus, 
Ford, G. W., 
Forrester, H. E., 
Forrester, F. L., 
Gehon, G. C.« 
Gerleman, F. M., 
Grimes, H. C, 
Grinbeck, H. K., 
Hoffman, P. G., 
Hoffman, John, 
Holecek, Anton, 
Holmes, Herman, 
Hcustrom, A. W., 
Isakson, Olaf, 
Jennings, C. H., 
Jenson, Martin, 
Keachie, J. L., 
Kelsen, C, 
Larson, Frank L. : 
Larson, H. W., 
Lea, A. H., 
Lorah, G. W., 
Main, J. D., 
Marx, J. J., 
Matravers, C. H., 



TOWN. 



COUNTY 



Centerville, Wisconsin. 

Millnerville, Plymouth. 
EastChainLake, Minnesota. 

Calmar, Winneshiek 

Waubeek, Linn. 

Crocker, Polk. 

Maynard, Fayetie. 

Hawkeye, Fayette. 

Nashua, Chickasaw. 

Armstrong, Emmet. 

Fillmore, Dubuque. 

Hawkeye, Fayette. 

Ottawa, Kansas. 

Great Bencl, Kansas. 

Jesup, Buchanan. 

Randall, Hamilton. 

Henry, 8. D. 

Harlan, Snelby. 

Twin Lakes, Minnesota. 

Ellsworth, Hamilton. 

Elgin, Fayette. 
FredericksburgChickasaw. 

Manchester, Deleware. 

Britian, 8. D. 

St. Lucas, Fayette. 

Chambers, Nebraska. 

Jewell, Hamilton. 

Salina, Kansas. 

Lamotte, Jackson. 

Hayfield, Hancock. 

Nevada, Story. 

Berkeley, Boone. 

Graettinger, Palo Alto. 

Thornburg, Keokuk. 

Carpenter, Mitchell. 

Dexter, Dallas. 

Jewell, Hamilton. 

Dows, Wright. 

Hartland, Minnesota. 

Amherst, Wisconsin. 

Big Rock, Scott. 

Sheffield, Out, Canada. 

Granville, Sioux. 

Iowa Falls, Hardin. 



312 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Meneiee, A. J., 


Atlantic, 


Cass. 


Mills, Cecil, 


Morgan, 


Missouri. 


McColly, Frank, 


Ames, 


Story. 


McClune, A. E„ 


Rippey, 


Greene. 


McFarland, B. F., 


Odebolt, 


Sac. 


McGranahan, W. H., 


Kernard, 


Pennsylvania 


Neil, J. H., 


Reinbeck, 


Grundy. 


Nelson, A. C, 


Oakland, 


Minnesota. 


Nelson, Christ, 


Exira, 


Audubon. 


Nemmer, J. C, 


Lamotte, 


Jackson. 


Peterson, L. C, 


Elkhorn, 


Shelby. 


Peterson, P. J., 


Story City, 


Story. 


Repka, F. L., 


Spencer, 


Clay. 


Rex, Edwin, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Robbins, John, 


Ledgewood, 


N. D. 


Robey, W. M., 


Albion, 


Illinois. 


Ross, G. Y., 


Fairfield, 


Jefferson. 


Rogers, R. E., 


Stewart, 


Guthrie. 


Russler, Chris, 


Hawkeye, 


Fayette. 


Schuknecht, A. C, 


Eagle Grove, 


Wright. 


Shellman, F. W., 


Curlew, 


Palo Aito. 


Shirk, John, 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Skinner, H. W., 


Vernon Center, New York. 


Smith, T., 


Arlington, 


Fayette. 


States, Henry, 


Gait, 


Wright. 


Stolberg, Rasmus, 


Denmark, 


Lee. 


Streight, Geo., 


Hobart, 


Kossuth. 


Swartzendruver, A. H., 


Rippey, 


Greene. 


Symonds, Fred, 


Dewey, 


Cass. 


Thieleke, August, 


Carroll, 


Carroll. 


Trimble, N. H., 


Aldeu, 


Hardin. 


Vind, Aage, 


Rochester, 


Minnesota. 


Werner, August, 


Williamsburg 


, Iowa. 


Williams, Edwin, 


Earlville, 


Deleware. 


Wittig, Thos., 


Rusk, 


Wisconsin. 


Youngdale, Geo., 


Harcourt, 


Webster. 


Zbornik, L., 


Hawkeye, 


Fayette. 



STOCK JUDGING SCHOOL, JANUARY, 1902. 

NAME. TOWN. COUNTY 



Aten, B. F., 
Arnold, Cliff, 
Andrews, S. D., 
Arp, A. P., 
Afbims, John L., 
Aber, S. Perry, 



High Point, Iowa. 
Adair, Iowa. 

New Provide'celowa. 
Eldridge, Iowa. 

Solon, Iowa. 

Oskaloosa, Towa. 



STUDENTS OF 


THE COLLEGE. 


3 


Andrews, W. W., 


Franklin, 


Term. 


Andrews, B. C, 


Ollie, 


Iowa. 


Armstrong, W. B., 


New Provide'celowa. 


Anderson, A. S., 


Alsen, 


8. D. 


Armstrong, W. U., 


Orient, 


Iowa. 


Ames, John, Jr., 


Buckingham, 


Iowa. 


Brown, Emerson, 


Lyons, 


Nebraska. 


Brunner, Wm., 


Marble Rock, 


Iowa. 


Black, C. A., 


Dallas Center 


, Iowa. 


Bloomers, G. W., 


Letts, 


Iowa. 


Brod, L. A., 


Talmage, 


Nebraska. 


Barhite, Geo. A., 


Alden, 


Iowa. 


Bahl, Adolph, Route C. 


, Dubuque, 


Iowa. 


Buchanan, W. H., 


Lamoille, 


Iowa. 


Buffington, G. L., 


Baxter, 


Iowa. 


Bihlmeyer, E., 


Eik Point, 


S. D. 


Botsford, Horace, 


Corning, 


Iowa. 


Bell, J. D., 


Bellwood, 


Nebraska. 


Ballard, J. R., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Benson, John W., 


Lamoille, 


Iowa. 


Bessire, H., 


Missouri V'y, 


Iowa. 


Bird, G. E., 


Rockford, 


Iowa. 


Binnis, J. C, 


Alta, 


Iowa. 


Boyd, C. J., 


Angus, 


Iowa. 


Bowman, E. F., 


Solon, 


Iowa. 


Bailey, P. M., 


Springville, 


Iowa. 


Bostie, Geo. M., 


Kahok, 


Missouri. 


Bishop, L. H., 


Rudd, 


Iowa. 


Brimmer, C. H., 


Winterset, 


Iowa. 


Brockaway, James, 


Ainsworth, 


Iowa. 


Banks, Chas. H., 


Knoxville, 


Iowa. 


Bergeson, E. 0., 


Norway, 


Iowa. 


Brown, Paul, 


New Ulm, 


Minnesota. 


Barkley, Geo., 


Wall L/ake, 


Iowa. 


Barton, A. L., 


Dallas Center, 


Iowa. 


Berry, Frank, 


Atlantic, 


Iowa. 


Bagwill, W. J., 


Millington, 


Illinois. 


Baker, Guy, 


Macksburg, 


Iowa. 


Bealy, G., 


Guthrie Cent'r 


, Iowa. 


Bookman, H. R., 


Grinnell, 


Iowa. 


Bohstedt, B. R., 


Victor, 


Iowa. 


Boss, Andrew, 


St Anth'y P'k. 


Minnesota. 


Cattell, N. H., 


West Branch, 


Iowa. 


Clark, Chas. W., 


Fairfield, 


Iowa. 


Clampitt, R. R., 


New Provide'celowa. 


Chapman, Grant, 


Bagley, 


Iowa. 


Crawford, M. R., 


Indianola, 


Iowa. 


Chadima, W. H., 


Fairfax, 


Iowa. 



313 



314 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Campbell, J. E., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Coon, W. 0., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Chapman, C. S., 


Rockford, 


Iowa. 


Conger, Claude, 


Seward, 


Illinois. 


Cadwell, Homer C, 


Logan, 


Iowa. 


Campbell, J. W., 


Castalia, 


Iowa. 


Carlson, Theo., 


Stanhope, 


Iowa. 


Clark, H. B., 


Monticello, 


Iowa. 


Campbell, G. A., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Curtiss, W. R., 


Trevor, 


Iowa. 


Cogwill, R. F., 


West Branch, 


Iowa. 


Clinton, C. A., 


Havelock, 


Iowa. 


Dickens, Scott M., 


Hedrick, 


Iowa. 


Diller, R. R., 


Marshalltown, 


Iowa. 


Davis, R. W., 


Lime Springs, 


Iowa. 


Dilley, Burdette B., 


Grundy Center, Iowa. 


Dunkelberg, Geo., 


Rockford, 


Iowa. 


Deyoe, S. C, 


Mason City, 


Iowa. 


Dunning, H., 


Charles City, 


Iowa. 


Eckstein, F. A., 


Chester, 


Iowa. 


Ellis, Albert, 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Eiler, G. H., 


Monticello. 


Iowa. 


Eno, W. H., 


Sheffield, 


Iowa. 


Eno, J. L., 


Sheffield, 


Iowa. 


Free, H. S., 


Rippey, 


Iowa. 


Funston, P.. 


Liberty, 


Iowa. 


Floto, H., 


Rhodes, 


Iowa. 


Fawcett, C, 


Springdale, 


Iowa. 


Findley, Geo. A., 


Grimes, 


Iowa. 


Felter, Victor, 


Washta, 


Iowa. 


Forest, G. S., 


Miles, 


Iowa. 


Feander, E. N., 


Stratford, 


Iowa. 


Fousch, C. D., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Fousch, Dave, 


Crocker, 


Iowa. 


Forbes, C. M., 


Jefferson, 


Iowa. 


Freimer, Gustave, 


Reinbeck, 


Iowa. 


Forman, L. W., 


West Branch, 


Iowa. 


Frost, Chas., 


Williamsburg 


Iowa. 


Fenton, Roger, 


Remsen, 


Iowa. 


Felter, H. L., 


Washta, 


Iowa. 


Felt, G. S., 1310 W. 35th St., 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


Frevert, F. A., 


Odebolt, 


Iowa. 


Frey, S. B., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Frost, C. E., 


WilHamsburg 


Iowa. 


Grcgson, J. E., 


Ewa'rt, 


N. i>. 


Cardner, J. F., 


Reinbeck, 


Iowa. 


Goss, Geo. A., 


Avoca, 


Iowa. 


Oanliner, Jas., 


Reinbeck, 


Iowa. 


Grimes. IT. 0., 


Zearing, 


Iowa. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE. 



315 



Guernsey, Seymour C, 


Confidence, 


Iowa. 


Gregory, J. A., 


Orient, 


Iowa. 


Gunderson, A. E., 


Odebolt, 


Iowa. 


Goreham, Edson, E., 


Odebolt, 


Iowa. 


Goreham, L. L., 


Odebolt, 


Iowa. 


Gaylord, W. E., 


Nora Springs, 


Iowa. 


Griffith, D. M., 


Anamosa, 


Iowa. 


Gilmore, I. F., 


Allen's Grove, 


Iowa. 


Glidden, W. J., 


Britt. 


Iowa. 


Hicks, J. F., 


Colo, 


Iowa. 


Haney, J. G., 


Courtland, 


Kansas. 


Hanger, S., 


Denmark, 


Iowa. 


Hawley, A. W., 


Pioneer, 


Iowa. 


Hausman, John A., 


De Witt, 


Iowa. 


Hendrix, L. D., 


Letts, 


Iowa. 


Hendrix, L. B., 


Letts, 


Iowa. 


Hufford, M. G.. 


Coon Rapids, 


Iowa. 


Hoffman, W. F., 


Washta, 


Iowa. 


Harvey, Alonzo, 


Ossian, 


Iowa. 


Howard, G. F., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Huston, Ralph, 


Sperry, 


Iowa. 


Hilstrum, W. R., 


Stanhope, 


Iowa. 


Hazen, Saml., 


Ft. Madison, 


Iowa. 


Hills, Henry, 


Bentonsp't, 


Iowa. 


Hocum, Martin, 


Gowrie, 


Iowa. 


Haubaker, E. H., 


Daiias Center, 


Iowa. 


Houghtaling, W. W., 


Indianola, 


Iowa. 


Holland, A. W., 


New London, 


Iowa- 


Hawk, Ray, 


Hedrick, 


Iowa. 


Hauptman, Perry, 


Hancock, 


Iowa. 


Hammer, Chester G., 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


Hester, Harry, 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Irvine, Charles, 


Ankeny, 


Iowa. 


Johnson, John A., 


Wall Lake, 


Iowa. 


Jory, Orville, 


Elwell, 


Iowa. 


Jones, B. F., 


Little Turkey, 


Iowa. 


Johnson, Leonard, 


Wall Lake, 


Iowa. 


Johnson, Cyrus, 


Green, 


Iowa. 


Jones, John, 


Ft. Madison, 


Iowa. 


Jones, R. P., 


Woodstock, 


Iowa. 


Jinderlee, Charles F., 


Elma, 


Iowa. 


Jordan, C. L., 


Central City, 


Iowa. 


Kretzinger, Wellman, 


Coon Rapids, 


Iowa. 


Koch, F. C, 


Miles, 


Iowa. 


Kirby, E. E., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Kopf, Geo., 


Maxwell, 


Iowa. 


Kluckholm, Ellis, 


Ellis, 


Iowa. 


Knapp, Asa B., 


Stanton, 


Minnesota 



31 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Kellogg, A. C, 


Miles, 


Iowa. 


Kinnick, W. B., 


Adel, 


Iowa. 


Kinnick, F. B., 


Adel, 


Iowa. 


Lundvall, Martin J., 


Boxholm, 


Iowa. 


Lackons, Seward, 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Lindwark, A., 


Stratford, 


Iowa. 


Llewellen, Merton, 


Corning, 


Iowa, Rt. I 


Lundquist, C. G., 


Stafford, 


Iowa. 


Little, Geo. W., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Marshall, A., 


Cresco, 


Iowa. 


Miller, C. M., 


New London, 


Iowa. 


Mitchell, P. R., 


De Soto, 


Iowa. 


Miller, W. D., 


New London, 


Iowa. 


Middlesworth, Geo., 


Shelbyville, 


Iowa. 


Munson, G. A., 


Maxwell, 


Iowa. 


McShane, Fred, 


Springville, 


Iowa. 


McCoy, K. H., 


Indianola, 


Iowa. 


McCleery, Albert, 


Waterman, 


Illinois. 


McLean, Donald, 


Lamoille, 


Iowa. 


Mooshant, Nicholas, 


Birmingham, 


Iowa. 


McCormick, C. A., 


Mechanicsv'e, 


Iowa. 


McNeil, H. A., 


Monona, 


Iowa. 


Mann, A. W., 


Lyons, 


Nebraska, 


Miles, Stanley, 


Miles, 


Iowa. 


Mead, John, 


Fairmount, 


Iowa. 


Moffit, E. B., 


Mechanicsv'e, 


Iowa. 


Maxwell, G. H., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Mosher, Oris. 


Walnut, 


Iowa. 


Morgan, R. B., 


Grinnell, 


Iowa. 


Merritt, Ira A., 


Kellerton, 


Iowa. 


Meythaler, C. E., 


Independence 


Iowa. 


Montgomery, A. C, 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


McMillen, A. R., 


Dnnkerton, 


Iowa. 


Marston, A., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


McGrew, Sam, 


Marsh alltown 


Iowa. 


McNeal, A. A., 


Bower, 


Illinois. 


McNeall, J. H., 


Ames. 


Iowa. 


Martin, W. G., 


Crawfordsv'e, 


Iowa. 


Martin, G. B., 


Crawfordsv'e, 


Towa. 


Messer, M. A., 


Odebolt, 


Iowa. 


Maw, A. W., 


Lyons, 


Nebraska, 


Maxwell, J. M., 


Crawfordsv'e, 


Iowa. 


McBirney, J. H., 


Conrad, 


Town. 


Manley, 0. N., 


Lvons, 


Nebraska. 


Mr:Kinzer, D. M., 


Missouri V'y, 


Iowa. 


Miller, A. W.. 


New Hamptor 


i, Towa. 


MeCullough, J. L., 


Lester, 


Towa. 


Mills, S. B., 


Ames, 


Towa. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE. 



817 



McMillen, A. R., 

McHenry, W. A., 

McVicker, C. D., 

Menzel, J. H., 

Noble, Dr. G. E., 

Nichols, Charles C, 

Nimes, D. B., 

Noyes, Carleton B., 

Naylor, H. A., 

Olson, W .C., 

Owens, W. P., 

Otto, W. W., 

Ostrus, O., 

Perry, Earl, 

Pratt, John G., 

Paulson, J. H., 

Paulson, Frank, 

Patten, G. P., 

Papgay, E. P., 

Powell, Austin, 

Plumley, Geo., 

Patter, Ross H., 

Peterson, Ole, 

Peterson, Prank O., 

Pierce, T. J., 
Rainbow, Robert, 
Reed, Oscar O., 
Reece, J. L., 
Robertson, Edwin, 
Reece, L. K., 
Ryan, Earl G., 
Rippey, G., 
Ramsay, L. T., 
Rockwell, Curtiss E., 
Rowatt, Geo. F., 
Rinehart, W. S., 
Rasmusson, W. C., 
Rasmussen, Hans, 
Riese, L. C, 
Randall, Harry L., 
Richert, W. P., 
Root, Geo. F., 
Raley, Thomas, 
Rice, B. B., 
Richardson, C. R., 
Stewart, N. W., 
Stromme, W. A., 



Dunkerton, Iowa. 
Denison, Iowa. 

Eagle Grove, Iowa. 
Hazleton, Iowa. 

Osage, Iowa. 

Rutland, Iowa. 

Emerson, Iowa. 

Waterloo, Nebraska. 

Clear Lake, Iowa. 
Akron, Iowa. 

Eagle Grove, Iowa. 
Ames, Iowa. 

Wiota, Iowa. 

Corning, Iowa. 

Virginia, Illinois. 

Britt, Iowa. 

Britt, Iowa. 

Adair, Iowa. 

Alden, Iowa. 

Washta, Iowa. 

Springville, Iowa. 

Oto, Iowa. 

Newell, Iowa. 

Moorland, Iowa. 

St. Anthony, Iowa. 

Macedonia, Iowa. 

Honey Creek, Illinois. 
NewProvidencelowa. 

Panama, Iowa. 
NewProvidencelowa. 

Irwin, Iowa. 

Coon Rapids, Iowa. 

Oakley, Iowa. 

Higmore, g. D. 

Des Moines, Iowa. 

Peterson, Iowa. 

Zearing, Iowa. 

Jacksonville, Iowa. 

Prescott, Iowa. 

Dallas Center, Iowa. 

Reinbeck, Iowa. 

Des Moines, Iowa. 

St. Anthony, Iowa. 

Grand Island, Nebraska. 

Elwell, Iowa. 

Kanawha, Iowa. 
1511 Isabelle Slowa. 



318 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Shoemaker, Guy, 


Corning, 


Iowa. 


Stoner, S. W., 


So. English, 


Iowa. 


Skinner, H. W., 


Vernon Center,Vew; York. 


Stevenson, Willie D., 


Hancock, 


Iowa. 


Sims, Arch L., 


Mt. Vernon, 


Iowa. 


Smith, A. F., 


Castalia, 


Iowa. 


Skinner, Chas. P., 


Moline, 


Illinois. 


Stanley, Alfred, 


Whittier, 


Iowa. 


Schwab, J. W., 


Stilson, 


Iowa. 


Schaeffer, Lloyd L., 


Eagle Grove, 


Iowa. 


Strohbelm, L. D., 


Reinbeck, 


Iowa. 


Strohbelm, Charles, 


Reinbeck, 


Iowa. 


Swedlund, Charles, 


Stanhope, 


Iowa. 


Stewart, H. A., 


Cherokee, 


Iowa. 


Spears, S. N., 


Fallula, 


Illinois. 


Stoufer, Harvey M., 


Rippey, 


Iowa. 


Swain, I. T., 


Tingley, 


Iowa. 


Schwark, Robt., 


Eldora, 


Iowa. 


Sanderson, Theo., 


Rock Dell, 


Minnesota. 


Sutherland, F. D., 


Centre Juncti on Minnesota. 


Starr, H. A., 


Maxwell, 


Iowa. 


Smith, C. M., 


St. Anthony, 


Iowa. 


Swedlund, J. W., 


Stratford, 


Iowa. 


Smith, Harlan, 


Wall Lake, 


Iowa. 


Steward, C. A., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Sample, Chris., 


Curlew, 


Iowa. 


Shaff, J. B., 


Folletts, 


Iowa. 


Stephenson, Floyd, 


Oskaloosa, 


Iowa. 


Teaquist, A. S„ 


Odebolt, 


Iowa. 


Trowbridge, S. A., 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


Turner, Asa, 


Maxwell, 


Iowa. 


Titus, E. A., 


Lytton, 


Iowa. 


Varley, T. J., 


Stuart, 


Iowa. 


Vincent, Homer, 


Letts, 


Iowa. 


Wilkinson, R. N., 


Gaza, 


Iowa. 


White, John F., 


Col. Junction, 


lowa. 


Worst, C. S., 


St. Paul 


Minnesota. 


Wild, Ed., 


Springville, 


Iowa. 


Whisler, J. J., 


Fairmount, 


Iowa. 


Wilcox, Levi A., 


Humbolat, 


Iowa. 


Williams, Harley, 


Pomeroy, 


Iowa. 


Worst, C. L., 


Fargo, 


IV. D. 


V/oolley, Fred, 


High Point, 


Iowa. 


Wright, Fred D., 


Mt. Pleasant, 


Iowa. 


Wylie, James L., 


Gilman, 


Iowa. 


Watts, S. W., 


Mnes, 


Iowa. 


White, Frank, 


West Side, 


Iowa. 






STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE. 319 



White, E. H., 


Estherville, 


Iowa. 


Western ,J. A., 


Beaconsfield, 


Iowa. 


Warren, Joseph, 


Keosauqua, 


Iowa. 


Wilson, C. E., 


Earlham, 


Iowa. 


Young, W. B., 


Humeston, 


Iowa. 


Zimmerman, A. T., 


Washta, 


Iowa. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 



LIST OF GRADUATES. 32l 



ALUMNI OF THE IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICUL- 
TURE AND THE MECHANIC ARTS. 

GRADUATES OF 1872. 

J. C. Arthur, B. Sc, D. Sc., La Fayette, Indiana. 

*P. S. Brown, B. Sc. 

O. H. Cessna, B. Sc, A. M.; D. D.,Ames, Iowa. 

*S. A. Churchill, B. Sc. 

*S. H. Dickey, B. Sc. 

Chas. N. Dietz, B. Sc, Omaha, Nebraska. 

Luther Poster, B. Sc, M.S.A., Mesilla Park, Las Cruces, N.M. 

*H. Fuller, B. Sc 

*P. L. Harvey, B. Sc, M. Sc. 

*E. M. Hungerford, B. Sc. 

Mattie (Locke) Macomber, B. Sc, 3020 Kingman Ave., 

Des Moines, Iowa. 
J. K. Macomber, B. Sc, 510 Youngerman Blk, Des Moines, la. 
L. W. Noyes, B. Sc, 234 Lincoln Park Blvd., Chicago, 111. 
H. L. Page, B. Sc, 810 Seventeenth street, Sioux City, Iowa. 
G. W. Ramsey, B. Sc, Masonville, Iowa. 

♦Fannie (Richards) Stanley, B. Sc. 
*C. A. Smith, B. Sc 
*I. W. Smith, B. Sc 

H. C. Spencer, B. Sc, Grinnell, Iowa. 

E. W. Stanton, B. Sc, M. Sc, Ames, Iowa. 

J. L. Stevens, B. Sc, 728 Linn St., Boone, Iowa. 

C. L. Suksdorf, B. Sc, 1335 Franklin St., Davenport, Iowa. 
*T. L. Thompson, B. Sc. 

C. H. Tillotson, B. Sc, Ormund, Nebraska. 
*C. P. Wellman, B. Sc. 

J. M. Wells, B. Sc, Nevada, Iowa. 

I 

GRADUATES OF 1873. 

E. L. Beard, B. Sc, Rural Route No. 5, Decorah, Iowa. 

Rowena F. (Edson) Stevens, B. Sc, 728 Linn St., Boone, la. 

*G. R. Flower, B. Sc. 

W. Green, B. Sc, Capitol Building., Des Moines, Iowa. 

*G. W. Harvey, B. Sc. 

A. M. Hawkins, B. Sc, 661 Yesler Way, Seattle, Wash. 

D. A. Kent, B. Sc, JewellJunctionlowa. 

*Deceased. 



322 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Kate (Krater) Starr, B. Sc., Algona, Iowa. 
*J. S. Lee, B. Sc. 

C. B. Maben, B. Sc, Wealthwood, Minnesota. 

M. F. Marshall, B. Sc, Atwood, Kansas. 

Hattie E. (Raybourne) Morse, B. Sc, Littleton, Colorado. 

W. C. Robinson, B. Sc, Trenton, Nebraska. 

M. Stalker, B. Sc, V. S., M. Sc, Ames, Iowa. 

Sallie (Stalker) Smith, B. Sc, Oskaloosa, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1874. 



Estella (Bebout) Morse, B. Sc, 1302 6th Ave., Des Moines.Ia. 

C. D. Boardman, B. Sc, 1601 Arlington Ave., Des Moines, la. 

C. S. Chase, B. Sc, Waterloo, Iowa. 

C. E. Clingan, B. Sc, Sioux City, Iowa. 

E. R. Clingan, B. Sc, Belt, Montana. 

*C. P. Hastings, B. Sc 

J. G. W. Kiesel, B. Sc, 57 Highland Place, Dubuque, Iowa. 

M. C. Litteer, B. Sc, Yukon, O. T. 

O. P. McCray, B. Sc, 620 Fourth St., Sioux City, Iowa. 

G. E. Marsh, B. Sc, Osage, Iowa. 

Mary A. (Palmer) Snell, B. Sc, Boone, Iowa. 

A. A. Parsons, B. Sc, 326 Nevada Ave., 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 
Eva E. (Paull) Vanslyke, B. Sc, 1406-lOth St., Des Moines.Ia. 
E. A. Pyne, B. Sc, Blairstown, Iowa. 

Ida E. (Smith) Noyes, B. Sc, 234 Lincoln Park Blvd., 

Chicago, Illinois. 
W. R. Smith, B. Sc, 512 34th Clark St., Chicago, Illinois. 
Kate (Tupper) Galpin, B. Sc, 515 S. Fremont Ave., 

Los Angeles, California. 
J. R. Whittaker, B. Sc, 703 Carroll St., Boone, Iowa. 
*S. Y. Yates, B. Sc 

GRADUATES OF 1875. 

E. P. Caldwell, B. Sc, Manila, P. I. 

Millah (Cherrie) Whiting, B. Sc,Skaguay, Alaska. 

Alice (Cunningham) Culver, B. Sc, Knoxville, Iowa. 
Lizzie M. (Curtis) Foster, B. Sc, Mesilla Park, 

Las Cruses, New Mexico. 
R. P. Kelley, B. Sc, Eureka, Kansas. 

C. H. Lee, B. Sc, 411 McPhee Block, Denver, Colorado. 
W. R. Lamoreaux, B. Sc, Ft. Dodge, Iowa. 

♦Deceased. 



LIST OF GRADUATES. 



323 



Hannah (Lyman) Caldwell, B. Sc, Helena, Montana. 
F. J. Macomber, B. Sc., Lewis, Iowa. 

Celestia (Neal) Gearliart, B. Sc, 359 7th St., Astoria, Ore. 



Lake Charles, Louisiana. 
Phoenix, Arizona. 

Panora, Iowa. 



Canton, 



S. D. 



T. L. Palmer, B. Sc, 

H. R. Patrick, B. Sc, 

C. E. Peterson, B. Sc, 

♦Ida (Ross) Boardman, B. Sc 

M. E. Rudolph, B. Sc, 

Ida L. (Shermann) Calkins, B. Sc, Storm Lakejowa. 

L. C. Thornton, B. Sc, Pocahontas, Iowa. 

J. M. Whitaker, B. Sc, Marshalltown, Iowa. 

Nancy (Wils) Roundy, B. Sc. ,Hawarden, Iowa. 

Lizzie M. (Wilson) Edwards, B.Sc, Waterloo, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1876. 

M. I. Aitken, B. Sc, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

A. P. Barker, B. Sc, Clinton , Iowa. 

S. W. Beard, B. Sc, Decorah, Iowa. 

A. M. Blodgett, B. Sc, 402 New England Building, 

Kansas City, Kansas. 
Julia C. (Blodgett) Hainer, B. Sc, Aurora, Nebraska. 

*L. A. Claussen, B. Sc. 

J. E. Cobbey, B. Sc, 720 Grant St., Beatrice, Nebraska. 
W. S. Collins, B. Sc, Basin, Wyoming. 

Winifred (Dudley) Shaw, B. Sc, 1700 4th St., Des Moinesja. 
J. J. Fegtly, B. Sc, 943 S. Main St., Kingfisher, O. T. 
W. J. Gilmore, B. Sc, Tipton, Iowa. 

J. F. Hardin, B. Sc, Eldora, Iowa. 

Ellen W. (Harlow) McKinzie, B. Sc, Palouse, Washington. 
A. E. Hitchcock, B. Sc, Mitchell, S. D. 

W. M. James, B. Sc, 309 Magoffin Ave., Catemaco, 

Vera Cruz, Mexico. 
Ellie L. (Mead) Dissmore, B. Sc, Lakota, N. D. 

G. A. Gerard, B. Sc, Denver, Colorado. 

H. N. Scott, B. Sc, 604 Portland Savings Bank, Portland, Ore 
A. B. Shaw, B. Sc, 1700 Fourth Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 
L. E. Spencer, B. Sc, 5717 Madison Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
W. W. Woodward, B. Sc, Lincoln. Nebraska. 

GRADUATES OF 1877. 



F. W. Booth, B. Sc, Mt. Airy St., Philadelphia, Penn. 
Alfaretta (Campbell) Fassett, B. Sc, 1185 Scoville Ave., 

Oak Park, Illinois. 
Mary, C. (Carpenter) Hardin, B.Sc, Eldora, Iowa. 

*Deceased. 



324 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



C. C. Colclo, B. Sc, Carroll, Iowa. 

Kate S. (Curtiss) Mirick, B. Sc, Monticello, Iowa. 

J. W. Doxsee, B. Sc. Monticello, Iowa. 

Mary (Farwell) Carpenter, B. Sc, Monticello, Iowa. 

A. P. Hargrave, B. Sc, 

W. A. Helsell, B. Sc, 

J. B. Hungerford, B. Sc, 

W. N. Hunt, B. Sc, 

*R. F. Jordan, B. Sc, 

*Cora B. (Keith) Pierce, B. Sc 

E. L. King, B. Sc, 

G. I. Miller, B. Sc, 

Alice (Neal) Gregg, B. Sc, 

J. C. Milnes, B. Sc, 2117 Olive St., Kansas City, Missouri. 

Cora M. (Patty) Payne, B. Sc, Linden, Iowa. 

L. B. Robinson, B. Sc, Harlan, Iowa. 

T. L. Smith, B. Sc, 134 10th St., Milwaukee. Wisconsin. 

P. L. Stratton, B. Sc, Osceola, S. D. 

*H. M. White, B. Sc. 



Dows, 

Odebolt, 

Carroll, 

Central City, 



Osceola, 

Ames, 

Traer, 



Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 

Nebraska. 



Nebraska. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 



GRADUATES OE 1878. 

*Plorence (Brown) Martin, B. Sc. 

Richard, Burke, B. Sc, Oskaloosa, Iowa. 

H. L. Glenn, B. Sc, Helena, Montana. 

A. E. Griffith, B. Sc, M. Sc, D. D.. East Des Moines, Iowa. 

J. C. Hainer, B. Sc, M. Sc, 309 Security Bldg., St. Louis, Mo. 

M. M. Hitchcock, B. C. E., 412 Pullman Bldg., Chicago, 111. 

C. E. Martin, B. C. E., San Antonio, Texas. 

J. C. Meredith, B. M. E., ' Kansas City, Missouri. 

Emma (McHenry) Glenn ,B. Sc, 924 11th Ave., Helena, Mont 

D. McKinnon, B. Sc, California Jc, Iowa. 
J. N. Muncey, B. Sc, Jesup, Iowa. 
C. P. Mount, B. C. E., C. E., care Am. Bridge Co., 

Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
Ellen (Rice) Robbins, B. Sc Manchester. N. H. 
W. K. Robbins, B. Sc, M. Sc, 290 McGregor St, 

Manchester, New Hampshire. 
L. (Shepherd) Beckwith, B. Sc, Pattiway, California. 

Ida (Twitchell) Blockman, B. S., Santa Maria, California. 

E. G. Tyler, B. C. E., Logan, Iowa. 

T. F. Lee, B. Sc, Lakeport, . California. 

G. W. Wilson, B. C. E., Rockwell, Iowa. 

J. W. Whitney, B. be, Prairieburg, Iowa. 

Belle Woods, B. Sc, Pueblo, Colorado. 



^Deceased. 



LIST OF GRADUATES. 
GRADUATES OF 1879. 



325 



Malinda (Cleaver) Faville, B. Sc., 428 Poole St., Norfolk, Va. 

Faville, Geo. C, B. S., D. V. M., Norfolk, Va. 

F .N. Field, B. C. E., Burlington, Iowa. 

F. H. Friend, B. C. E., 598 Carroll St., St. Paul, Minnesota. 

*S. Carrie (Carter) Hanson, B. Sc. 

A. L. Hanson, B. C. E., Ada, Minnesota. 

T. V. Hoggart, B. Sc, Nome, Alaska. 

J. E. Hyde, B. Sc, Fargo, N. D. 

Lillie M. (Croy) Lee, B. Sc, 118 Oak Park, Chicago, Illinois. 

L. L. Manwaring, B. Sc, Stillwater, Minnesota. 

W. G. McConnon, B. M. E., care Westinghouse Elec Co., 

Pittsburg, Penn. 
Jennie (McElyea) Beyer, B. Sc, Ames, Iowa. 

*J. C. Noble B. Sc. 

Herbert Osborn, B. Sc, M. Sc, 485 King Ave., Columbus, O. 
J. D. Shearer, B. Sc, 517 1st Ave., Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
Fremont Turner, B. M. E., 900 16th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
W. M. Scott, B. Sc, Kiona, Washington. 

J. M. Waugh, B. Sc, 621-100 Jackson St., Chicago, Illinois. 
*Genevieve (Welch) Barstow, B. Sc. 

Willis Whited, B. M. E., 286 Main St., Sta. B., Pittsburg, Pa. 
Alice (Whited) Burling, B. Sc, Eldora, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1880. 



M. J. Bailey, B. Sc, Custer City, S. D. 

D. D. Briggs, B. Sc, Nevada, Iowa. 

*F. Boddy, B. Sc. 

O. S. Brown, B. Sc, 

M. Hakes, B. Sc, 

J. Hassett, B. Sc, 

*E. D. Harvey, B. Sc. 

D. S. Hardin, B. Sc, 

Carrie (Lane Chapman) Catt, 

*C. H. McGrew, B. Sc. 

*R. M. Nicholson, B. Sc 

*G. E. Reed. B. Sc. 

J. L. Simcoke, B. Sc, Adel, Iowa. 

C. D. Taylor, B. Sc, Seattle, Washington. 

W. A. Thomas, D. V. M., Lincoln, Nebraska. 

J. Vincent, D. V. M., Shenandoah, Iowa. 

W. B. Welch, B. S., D. V. M., Marshall, Missouri. 



Meservey, Iowa. 

Laurens, Iowa. 

Papillion, Nebraska. 

Alma, Nebraska. 

B. Sc, Bensonhurst-by-the 
Sea, New York, New York. 



♦Deceased. 






326 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

GRADUATES OF 1881. 

Wm. C. Armstrong, B. C. E., Clinton, Iowa. 

Nellie M. (Bell) McGavern, B. Sc., Missouri Vley, Iowa. 
A. M. Beresford, B. Sc, Orleans, Nebraska. 

Thomas, Burke, B. Sc., Baker City, Oregon. 

*Marilla J. Crossmam B .Sc 

Chas. M. Coe, B. Sc, Cor. 11th & Broadway, Kansas City, Mo. 
F. E. Colby, B. C. E., Onawa, Iowa. 

J. S. Dewell, B. Sc, Missouri Valleylowa. 

C. A. Dodge, B. C. E., Orange City, Iowa. 

E. C. Fortner, B. Sc, 801-126 State St., Chicago, Illinois. 

F. E. Furry, B. Sc, Alden, Iowa. 
M. J. Furry, B. Sc, Alden, Iowa. 
Julia M. Hanford, B. Sc, 811 S. 11th St., Tacoma, Wash. 
*J. R. Hopkins, B. Sc 

J. S. McGavern, B. Sc, Missouri Valleylowa. 

W. H. McHenry, B. Sc, 298 Cotton Grove Ave., Des Moines.Ia 
W. O. McElroy, B. C. E., Newton, Iowa. 

Fanny J. (Perrett) Gault, B. Sc, 520 N. G. St., 

Tacoma, Washington. 
Alice I. (Sayles) Osborn, B. Sc, 485 King Ave., Columbus, 0. 
T. W. Shearer, B. Sc, Wallisville, Texas. 

GRADUATES OF 1882. 

W. D. Atkinson, B. Sc, Parsons, Kansas. 

*J. A. Blaine, B. Sc 

Etta M. Budd. B. Sc, Ames, Iowa. 

Geo. W. Catt, B. C. E., Bensonhurst-by-the-Sea, New York, 

New York. 
Mary (Coe) Lorbeer, B. Sc, Holt Ave., Pomona, California. 
W. V. A. Dodds, B. Sc, Beatrice, Nebraska. 

W. M. Dudley, B. Sc, Villisca, Iowa. 

*H. J. Gable ,B. Sc. 

C. I. Lorbeer, B. Sc, Holt Avenue, Pomona, California. 
J. B. Marsh, B. M. E., 1700 9th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
E. A. McDonald, B. Sc, City of Mexico, Mexico. 

J. R. McKimm, B. Sc, Pittsburg, Kansas. 

Nellie B. (Merrill) Wheeler, B. Sc, 1156 9th St., 

Des Moines, Iowa. 
Delia A. Neal, B. Sc, Lake Charles, Louisiana. 

J. H. Patten, B. Sc, Denver, Colorado. 

Hattie Perrett, B. Sc, Rock Falls, Iowa. 

Lizzie Perrett, B. Sc, Rock Falls, Iowa. 

^Deceased. 



LIST OF GRADUATES. 



327 



.C. Peterson, B. Sc., 7405 Princeton Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
*Kitty E. Reeve. B. Sc. 

C. F. Saylor, B. Sc, 1082 21st St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Sarah (Smith) McDonald, B. Sc, City of Mexico, Mexico. 



D. T. Stockman, B. Sc, 
W. S. Summers, B. Sc, 
W. W. Wheeler, B. £c 
W. U. White, B. Sc, 



Sigourney, Iowa. 
Omaha, .Nebraska. 

171j 9th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Hope, S. D. 



GRADUATES OF 1883. 



A. M. Allen, B. Sc, Gothenburg, Nebraska. 

A. G. Andrews, B. C. E., U. S. Surveyors Office, 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 
G .M. Burnham, B. Sc, Ashland, Wisconsin. 

Bertie N. (Carson) Cleave, B. Sc, Marseilles, Illinois. 
George Caven, B. C. E., 41 E. 3bth St., Chicago, Illinois. 



Jennie L. Christman, B. Sc, 



Albany, 



New York. 



Virginia (Colclo) Quint, B. Sc, 1715 ath St., Des Moines, la. 



Geo. W. Curtis, B. S. A., M. S. S., Dallas, 

*Lottie Estes, B. S. 

C. H. Flynn, D. V. M., Postville, 

♦Jessie E. (Frater) Muncey, B. Sc. 

R. M. Hunter, B. Sc, Sibley, 

Chas. H. Kegley, B. S. A., Olympia, 



Texas. 



xowa. 



Iowa. 
Washington. 



Minnie (Knapp) Mayo, B. Sc, Lake Charles, Louisiana. 
Herman Knapp, B. S. A., Ames, Iowa. 

Mary W. (McDonald) Knapp, B. Sc, Ames, Iowa. 

Kate (McNeill) Wells, B. Sc, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

A. M. Miller, B. Sc, 1314 E. 13th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 



E. Mead, B. C. E., Warren Ave., Cheyenne, 
Emily A. Reeve, B. Sc, Hartford, 

M. J. Riggs, B. C. E., American Bridge Co. 



S. C. Scott, B. Sc, 
*Effie G. Slater, B. Sc. 
F. J. Smith, B. Sc, 
M. E. Wells, B. Sc, 
W. D. Wells, B. Sc. 



Lyons, 



Wyoming. 
Conn. 
Toledo, Ohio. 
Iowa. 



Alton, Iowa. 

Lincoln, Nebraska. 

1716 Park Ave., Davenport, Iowa. 
Mabel A. (Young) Alexander, B. c, Clarion, Iowa. 
Agatha M. (West) Ramsey, B. Sc, Rock Rapids, Iowa. 



GRADUATES OF 1884. 

J. F. Armstrong, B. Sc, Faulkton, S. D. 

Edna (Bell) Anderson, B. Sc, Missouri V'y., Iowa. 

T. F. Bevington, B. Sc, Iowa Bldg., Sioux City, Iowa. 



*Deceased. 



328 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Geo. R. Chatburn, B. C. E., University of Neb., Lincoln, Neb. 
C. J. Clark, B. C. E., Denver, Colorado. 

J. E. Daugherty, B. C. E., Texarkana, Arkansas. 

*W. f. Dickey, B. Sc. 

L. M. Garrett, B. Sc., 703 W. 7th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
J. W. Gill, B. C. E., 

B. T. Hainer, B. Sc, 
H. H. (Hainer) Gabel, B. Sc. 
*A. E. (Henry) Quint, B. Sc. 
G. E. Hibbs, B. Sc, 
A. S. Hitchcock, B. S. A., M. S( 
F. A. Huntley, B. S. A., 

F. L. Lambert, B. S. A„ 
WED. Morrison, D. V. M., 

E. J. Nichols, B. C. E., 

G. M. Osborn, D. V. M., 

F. L. Pitman, B. C. E., 
J. F. Porter, B. C. E., 
Addie (Rice) Hainer, B. Sc, 

C. H. Sloan, B. Sc, 

G. W. Thompson, B. C. E., 
C. Vincent, B. Sc. 
M. Vincent, B. S. A., 

lone (Weatherby) Marsh, B. Sc, 1700 9th St., Des Moines,Ia. 
*W. J. Wicks, B. Sc 

Webster City, Iowa. 
Skaguay, Alaska. 



Perry, 


0. T. 


Aurora, 


Nebraska. 


Mitchellville, 


Iowa. 


Washington, 


D. C. 


Moscow, 


Idaho. 


Charles City, 


Iowa. 


Los Angeles, 


California 


Tyler, 


Texas. 


Lebanon, 


Missouri. 


Port Norfolk, 


Virginia. 


Alton, 


Illinois. 


St. Louis, 


Missouri. 


Geneva, 


Nebraska. 


Casey, 


Iowa. 


Omaha, 


Nebraska. 


Houston, 


Texas. 



W. H. Wier, B. Sc, 

Alfred Williams, B. C. E., 

Fannie R. Wilson, B. Sc, 501 Poplar St., Atlantic, Iowa. 



G. W. Wormley., B. C. E. 



Newton, 



Iowa. 



GRADUATES OF 1885. 



C. L. Bowie, B, M. E., 105 S. 10th St., Tacoma, Washington. 
L. G. Brown, B. C. E., 241 Fisk St., Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 



C. A. Cary, B. Sc, D. V. M., 

D. B. Collier ,B. S. A., 
D. E. Collins, D. V. M., 

G. F. Goodno, B. Sc, M. Sc, 



Auburn, Alabama. 

Durant, Iowa. 

Beatrice, Nebraska. 

Waukegan, Illinois. 
G. H. Giover, B. Sc, D. V. M., 39 34th Ave., Helena, Montana. 
E. Gray, B. C. E., 1353 Monadnock Block, Chicago, Illinois. 
W. A. Grow, B. C. E., Grantsville, Montana. 

W. M. Hays, B. S. A., M. S. A., St. Anthony PkMinnesota. 
*E. N. Hill, B. M. E. 

D. L. Hutchinson, l^ C. E., Goldfield, Colorado. 

Hannah (Hutton) Shearer, B. Sc, Wallisville, Texas. 
L. D. Jackson, B. M. E., 



i"Deci 



LIST OF GRADUATES. 



329 



M. E. Johnson, D. V. M., 107 Corning St., Red Oak, Iowa. 



G. W. Knorr, B. S. A., Clark Stat'n, 


Kentucky. 


*C. J. Lee, B. Sc. 




Prank Leverett, B. Sc, Denmark, 


Iowa. 


J. C. Lipes, B. Sc, Aurora, 


Missouri. 


J. C. B. Lockwood, B. C. E., Seattle, 


Washington 


♦Anna G. (McConnon) Bevington. B. Sc 




L. F. McCoy, B. C. E., Dumont, 


Iowa. 


A. G. Mosier, B. C. E., Dawson City, 


N. W. T. 


Anna L. (Nichols) Goodno, B. Sc, Waukegan, 


Illinois. 


W. B. Niles, D. V. M., Omaha, 


Nebraska. 


*Oak G. Norton. B. S. A. 




J .G. Pope, B. M. E., Cuyohoga F'ls 


,Ohio. 



Emma M. (Porter) Sloan, B. Sc, Geneva, Nebraska. 

A. U. Quint, B. Sc, 1715 9th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 

E. E. Sayers, D. V. M., Algona, Iowa. 

F. S. Schoenleber, B. S. A., M. S. A., Morris, Illinois. 
I. B. Schreckengast, B. Sc, West Liberty, Iowa. 
Lydia A. (Schreckengast) Collier, B. ScDurant, Iowa. 
S. Stewart, D. V. M., Kansas City, Kansas. 
C. E. Underhill, B. Sc, Onawa, Iowa. 



GRADUATES OF 1886. 

J. W. Bradford, B. C. E., 

B. Buchli, B. Sc, D. V. M., 

P. S. Burns, B. Sc, 

H. L. Chatterton, D. V. M., 

S. D. Colugh, B. Sc, 

M. Z. Farwel, B. Sc, 

*V. C. Gambell. B. Sc 

W. E. Gamble, B. Sc, 100 State Street, Chicago, Illinois. 

S. W. Green, B. S. A., 244 and 226 Ex. Bldg., So. Omaha, Neb. 

S. H. Hedges, B. C. E., 1042 Longwood Ave., Chicago, 111. 

W. B. Hunter, B. Sc. (Times Herald), Chicago, Illinois. 



Nashua, 


Iowa. 


Alma, 


Kansas. 


Boston, 


Mass. 


Peterson, 


Iowa. 


Pine Bluffs, 


Arkansas 


La Junta, 


Colorado. 



A. P. Johnson, B. C. E., 




Sigourney, 


Iowa. 


J. A. Johnson/D. V. M., 




Sioux Citv, 


Iowa. 


E. S. Johnson, D. V. M., 




Morning Sun, 


Iowa. 


Lizzie Langfitt, B. Sc, 




Greenfield, 


Iowa. 


H. J. Langfitt, B. Sc, 




Hutchinson, 


Minnesota 


W. R. Meyers, B. Sc, 




Garvanza, 


California 


E. P. Niles, D. V. M., 




Blacksburg, 


Virginia. 


M. H. Reynolds, B. S. A., D. 


V 


, Anthony Part 


-, Minn. 


0. W. Rich, B. S. A., 




Atlantic, 


Iowa. 


E. S. Richman, B. S. A., M. S. 


A 


, Fullerton, 


California 


H. S. Stewart, B. C. E., 




Texarkana, 


Texas. 


♦Deceased. 









330 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



J. J. Streets, D. V. M., 

Cora (Wagner) Hunter, B. Sc. 



Los Angeles, California. 
Des Moines, Iowa. 



GRADUATES OF 1887. 



Illinois. 
New York. 



G. Z. Barnes, D. V. M., Pekin, 

S. A. Beach, B. S. A., M. Sc, Geneva, 

*R. C. Bennett, D. V. M. 

E. Besser, D. V. M., 419 Market St., Logansport, Indiana. 

C. M. Canady, B. C. B., care Am. Bridge Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Emma I. (Casey) Scofield, .b. L., Azusa, California. 

E. J. Christie, B. Sc, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
*S. B. Clark, B. Sc. 

G. H. Colton, B. S. A., Seattle, Washington 

*C. J. Coley, B. Sc 

Esther Crawford, B. L., Dayton, Iowa. 

C. F. Curtiss, B. S. A., M. S. A., College Campus, Ames, Iowa 

A. C. Felt, B. Sc, 

C. W. Ferguson, D. V. M., 

*W. H. Frater, B. C. E. 

G. S. Govier, B. C. E., 

F. H. Graves, D. V. M., 
Norma (Hainer) Beach, B. Sc, 
L. V. Harpel, B. Sc, 
N. L. Hansen. B. Sc, M. Sc, 
F. W. Hoskins, D. V. M., 
W. S. Igo, D. V. M., 

E. A. Kirkpatrick, B. Sc, M. Ph., Fitchburg 

F. W. Malley, B. Sc, M. Sc, 
O. E. McCarthy, B. C. E. 
A. E. Osborn, B .Sc, 
L. G. Patty ,D. V. M„ 
Joseph Paxton, B. C. E., 
J. A. Perley, B. C. E., 
W. A. Peterson, B. Sc, 3046 Wentworth Ave., Chicago, 111. 

G. R. Randall, B. M. E., Burchinal, Iowa. 

G. L. Schermerhorn, B. M. E., 101 State St., Schenectady, 

New York. 
222 W. 4th St., Jacksonville, Fla. 
Plainview, Nebraska. 



Superior, 


Nebraska. 


Chappell, 


Nebraska. 


Argentine, 


Kansas. 


Madrid, 


Iowa. 


Geneva, 


New York 


Perry, 


iowa. 


Brookings, 


S. D. 


Sioux xtapids, 


Iowa. 


Paimyra, 


Iowa. 


Fitchburg, 


Mass. 


College Stat'n 


, Texas. 


La Porte City, 


Iowa. 


Carroll, 


Iowa. 


Aspen, 


Colorado. 


Monticello, 


Iowa. 



C. L. Spencer, B. S. A. 
G. W. Sturtz, B. S. A., 
R. P. Thurtle, D. V. M 
John Tillie, D. V. M., 



Ashawa, 
Muscatine, 



Iowa. 

.owa. 



Ollie (Wilson) Curtiss, B. L., College Campus, Ames, Iowa. 



J. W. Wilson, D. M. V., 



Traer, 



Towa. 



*I)eceased. 



LIST OF GRADUATES. 



381 



GRADUATES OF 1888. 

John G. Abraham, B. Sc., Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. 

F. W. Ainsworth, D. V. M., Pittsburg, Penn. 

J. B. Allen, B. Sc, Cozad, Nebraska. 

Clarence Baker, B. C. E,, 1022 25th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 

Ethel Bartholomew, B. Sc, Chariton, Iowa. 

Chas. L. Bartholomew, B. Sc, 623 E. 18th St., 

Minneapolis, Minnesota. 



Storm Lake, Iowa. 
Ottumwa, Iowa. 

Baxter, Iowa. 

119th St., Whiting, Indiana. 
Oklahoma, O. T. 

Estherville, Iowa. 

Fayetteville, Arkansas. 

S. Weymouth, Mass. 

Wardner, Idaho. 

Ella (Henderson) Bartholomew, B. L., 623 E. 18th St., 

Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
Chas. W. Hunt, B. Sc, Woodbine, Iowa. 

F. L. Lightner ,B. Sc, Iowa Station, Louisiana. 

Elizabeth Louise (McCuskey) Morrison, B. L., 1002 3rd Ave 

Council Bluffs, Iowa. 



Scott, Bradford, B. Sc, 

A. Brandvig, B. Sc, 

G. L. Buffington, D. V. M., 

J. G. Davidson, B. M. E. 

F. L. Dobbin, B. Sc, 

*C. A. Finnigan, B. C. E. 

Grant Flora, B. C. E., 

W. N. Gladson, B. M. E., 

K. H .Granger, B. Sc, 

James E. Gyde, B. Sc, 



G. L. Meisner, B. Sc, 
Laura R. Moulton, B. L. 
E. K. Paine, D. V. M., 
R. C. Sayers, D. V. M., 



Liberty, 
Grinnell, 
Bondurant, 
Fairfield, 



Nebraska. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 



E. A. Sheafe, B. Sc, 120 S. Court St., Ottumwa, Iowa. 



B. J. Sheldon, B. Sc, Ames, 
E. B. Skinner, B. Sc, Calliope, 
N. Spencer, B. Sc, Algona, 

C. E. Tallman, B. Sc, 
W. L. Thompson, B. Sc, Bayard, 
L. C. Tilden, B. Sc, Ames, 
W. E. Warwick, B. M. E., Whiting, 
Nannie E. Waugh, B. L., Manchester 
Florence (Weatherby) Hainer, B. L., Perry, 
Julia A. (Wentch) Stanton, B. L., x\mes, 
*W. H. Wright, B. Sc 
Sherman Yates, B. Sc, Tipton, 

GRADUATES OF 1889. 



Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Scotts Stat'n., Alabama. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Indiana. 
Iowa. 
O. T. 
Iowa. 

Iowa. 



C. A. Ashworth, D. V. M., 
James A. Baker, B. Sc, 



Valley Jc, 
Ames, 



Iowa. 
Iowa. 



'Deceased. 



332 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



J. E. Banks, B. C. E., care Am. Bridge Co., Pittsburg, Penn. 

S. W. Beyer, B. Sc, Ph. D., Ames, Iowa. 

D. B. Bisbee, B. Sc, 7340 Bond Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 

*A. E. D. Bosquet, D. V. M. 

W. B. Budrow, B. Sc, Blanca, Autofagasta, Chile, So. 



*H. W. Chamberlain, B. Sc. 




America 


*F. H. Cooley, B. u. E. 






Harry B. Day, B. M. E., 


Seymour, 


Iowa. 


J. E. Durkee, B. Sc, 


Storm Lake, 


Iowa. 


H. A. Gossard, B. Sc, 


Lake City, 


Florida. 


A. L. Graham, B. M. E., 


Sarnia, 


Ontario. 



B. T. Green, B. Sc, 2811 Cottage Grove Ave., Chicago, 111. 
W. R. Hensen, B. Sc, Chinook, Montana. 
Nellie Johnson, B. L., Edmond, o. T. 
James A. Kelsey, B. Sc, M. Sc, New Brunsw'kJN. J. 

C. F. Kimball, B. M. E., Court House, Council Bluffs, Iowa. 
C. W. Lamborn, B. C. E., 624-184 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 
John McBirney, D. V. M., Clarinda, Iowa. 
Albert McClelland, B. Sc, Ivy, Iowa. 

A. A. McLaughlin, B. Sc, 217 Youngerman Block, 

Des Moines, Iowa. 

J. A .Meissner, B. Sc, Reinbeck, Iowa. 

S. W. Morris, B .Sc, Corning, Iowa. 

S. B. Nelson, D. V. M., Pullman, Washington 

Belie Newell, B .L., Woodward, Iowa. 

Ira A. Nichols, B. Sc, Iowa Falls, Iowa. 

John H. Piatt, D. V. M., Montezuma, Iowa. 

W. U. Rickard, B. C. E., Texarkana, Arkansas. 

P. H. Rolfs, B. Sc, M. Sc, Miami, Florida. 

*John Schoenleber, B. M. E., 

W. U. Scott, B. Sc, Slater, Iowa. 

J. O. Simcoke, D. V. M., Stuart, Iowa. 

John A. Shelton, B. Sc, Butte, Montana. 

Wm. R. Shoemaker, B. Sc, 6124 Ingleside Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Virgil Snyder, B. Sc, A. M. Ph. D., 204 University Ave., 

Ithaca, New York. 

Palmer W. Starr, B. C. E., Carson, Iowa. 

C. H. Stearns, B. Sc, Des Moines, Iowa. 

John S. Stroud, B. Sc, Des Moines, Iowa. 

M. W. Thornburg, B. Sc, Redfield, Iowa. 

Rosalia Thurliman, B. L., Carroll, Iowa. 

C. M. Wade, B. Sc, Sioux City. Iowa. 

Mary C. (Zimbleman) Otis, B. L., 322 Story St., Boone, la. 



♦Deceased. 



LIST OF GRADUATES. 



Alta, 


Iowa. 


Whiting, 


Indiana. 


Magnolia, 


Iowa. 


Magnolia, 


Iowa. 


chigan Ave., 


Chicago, 111. 


Chicago, 


Illinois. 


Milford, 


Iowa. 


Washington, 


D. C. 


Audubon, 


Iowa. 


Hudson, 


Wisconsin 


Brooklyn. 


Iowa. 



GRADUATES OF 1890. 

Nettie Bannister, B. L., Cherokee, Iowa. 

Jay A. Bishop, B. Sc, New Hampton, Iowa. 

Wm. E. Bolles, B. C. E., Am. Bridge Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

John A. Bramhall, B. ivi. E., Globe Mach. Co., Des Moines,Ia. 

Meyer Brandvig, B. Sc, M. Ph., Gilbert Stat'n, Iowa. 

Joseph S. Chamberlain, B. Sc, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Herbert E. Crosby, B .Sc, 

Chas. D. Davidson, B. M. E., 

W. C. Dewell, B. Sc, 

Ada (Mills) Dewell, B. L., 

Edward N. Eaton, B. Sc, 1427 A3 

Mary E. (Fellows) Weare, B. L. 

C. Quintus Fuller, D. V. M., 

*Belle (Gaston) James. 

T. Alexander Geddes, D. V. M., 

J. Melville Graham, B. Sc, 

*May Hardy, B. L. 

Spencer Haven, B. Sc, 

Eugene Henley, B. Sc, 

T. Siegel Howard, B. Sc, Highland Park, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Thos. S. Kerr, 2829 Calumet Ave., Chicago Illinois. 

Edw. A. Kreger, B. Sc, Cherokee, Iowa. 

Alice Mann, B. Sc, 948 W. Holt Ave., Pamona, California. 

Bertha Mann, B. Sc, Algona, Iowa. 

James McLaughlin, D. V. M.,Blue Earth City, Minnesota. 

James C. Norton, D. V. M., 

Robt. W. Olmstead, B. Sc, 

Violet U. Quint, B. L., 

Maria M. Roberts, B. L., 

Geo. H. Schulte, B. Sc, 

Wm. H. Shaul, B. Sc, 

Kate (Stevens) Harpel, B. L., 

John T. Stinson, B. Sc, 

Rodney B. Swift, B. Sc, 4937 Madison Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Edw. Thurliman, B. Sc, Carroll, Iowa. 

Leo. Thurliman, B. Sc, M. Sc, 1760 Monadnock Bldg., 

Chicago, Illinois. 
Cora H. T. (Van Velson) Lambert, B. L., 933 W. 56th St., 

Chicago, Illinois. 
A. R. Williams, D. V. M., Glenwood, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 18 yl. 

Geo. S. Angus, B. C. E., care Mackolite Plaster Co., 

Chicago Heights, Chicago, Illinois. 



Phoenix, 


Arizona 


Rock Island, 


Illinois. 


Manhattan, 


Kansas. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Elkader, 


Iowa. 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


Perry, 


Iowa. 



Mount'n GroveMissouri. 



'Deceased. 



334 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Win. H. Austin, D. V. M., Newton, Iowa. 

Chas. A. Ballreich, B. Sc., Box 737, Huston, Texas. 
Sara T. Barrows, B. L., Columbus, Ohio. 

Frank J. Browne, B. C. E., Pipestone, Minnesota. 

Donald, M. Carter, B. M. E., 1410-204 Dearborn St., 

Chicago, Illinois. 
Geo. L. Christy, B. C. E., 447 W. 23rd St., New York, N. Y. 
*Clinton C. Clarke, B. Sc. 

May (Cottrell) Woods, B. L., Woodward, Iowa. 
Robt. M. Dyer, B. M. E., 641 S. Avers Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
Wm. A. Heck, D. V. M., Maquoketa, Iowa. 

Wm. H. Heilman, B. Sc, M. Sc, Pullman, Washington. 

Rollin E. Hinds, B. C. E., 
R. Frederick Hodson, B. Sc. 
E. P. Hodson, B. Sc, 
Thomas B. Hutton, B. Sc, 
Wm. H. Jackson, B. C. E., 1522 11th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Chas. W. Johnson, jo. Sc, Charles City, Iowa. 

W. Clyde Jones, B. M. E., 5540 Monroe Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Edwin S. King, B. Sc, Grundy Center,Iowa. 

Eleanor (King) Moss, B. L., 1052 20th St., Des Moines, la. 
Wm. A. McClanahan, D. V. M., Redding, Iowa. 

L. D .McNaughton, B. M. E., Eagle Grove, Iowa. 
John H. Moore, B. C. E., La Porte City, Indiana. 

Berkley, Moss, B. C. E., 1052 20th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Mary A. Nichols, B. L., B. Sc, 246 W. 84th St., New York, NY 

Orange City, Iowa. 



Ottumwa, 


Iowa. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Britt, 


Iowa. 


Odebolt, 


Iowa. 



Victor, Iowa. 

ColumbusCity, Iowa. 



E. C. Oggel, B. Sc, 
John F. Schulte, B. Sc, 
Benj. F. Shaum, B. C. E., 
J. H. Shepperd, B. Ag., M. S. A 

F. A. Sirrine, B. Sc, M. Sc, 
Nels Sorenson, D. V. M., 
John E. Spann, B. Sc, 
Grant F. Starkey, D. V. M., 
Walter D. Steele, B. M. E., New York City, 
Willis C. kwift, B. M. E., 4937 Madison Ave 
Dennis A. Thornburg, B. Sc, Grinnell, 
Samuel Whitbeck, D. V. M., Decorah, 
Peter M. Wilson ,D. V. M., Traer, 



Fargo, 

Jamaica, 

Louisville, 

Indianapolis, 

Jordan, 



N. D. 

Long Island. 

Kentucky. 

Indiana. 

Iowa. 

N. Y. 

Chicago, 111. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 



GRADUATES OF 1892. 

Chas. B. Adams, D. V. M., 2396 116th St., Chicago, Illinois. 

Geo. M. Ashford, B. C. E,. Cape Nome, Alaska. 

R. B. Benjamin, B. Sc, 1992 W. Van Buren St., Chicago, 111. 



'Deceased. 



LIST OF GRADUATES. 



335 



Alice M. Beach, B. Sc., M. Sc, Urbana, Illinois. 

Estella (Blaine) Spence, B. L. 1030 17th St., Des Moines,Ia. 
Emma H. (Boyd) Jones, B. L., 5540 Monroe Ave., 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Mason City, Iowa. 

Boone, Iowa. 

E St. Louis, Illinois. 



Eugene G. Brown, B. Sc, 

Geo. W. Brown, B. C. E., , 

Inez J. Christie, B. L., 

E. E. Clinton, B. C. E., 493 W. Monroe St., Chicago, Illinois. 

W. Ross Cooper, D. V. M., Newton, Iowa. 

Edgar C. Corry, B. Sc, Manhattan Bldg., Des Moines, Iowa. 



Genevieve Culver, B. L., 
Homer Davis, D. V. M., B. Sc. 

Anna (Dean) Blair, B. L., 
Chas. C. Deering, B. Sc, 
C. U. Emry, B. C. E.. 
Geo. S. Poster, B. C. E., 
Kittie B. Freed, B. L., 



Audubon, Iowa. 

M. Sc., 2617 Franklin St., 
Omaha, Nebraska. 

E. Des Moines, Iowa. 

Boone, Iowa. 

Fairfield, Iowa. 

Ames, Iowa. 

Arapahoe, Nebraska, 

Ellis T. Gilbert, B. Sc, 202 N. 8th St., Council Bluffs, Iowa. 
Eugene B. Henry, B. Sc, Klamath F'ls, Oregon. 

William C .Hicks, B. Sc, Throop and 105th St., Chicago, 111. 



Edwin D. Jones, B. C. E., 
Elmer E. Kaufman, B. Ag., 
S. Arthur Knapp, B. Sc, 
E. A. Little, B. C. E., 
C. W. Mally, B. Sc, M. Sc, 
Jessie (Maxwell) Freeland, B. L., Ames, 

Ames, 



Hamburg, Arkansas. 

Fargo, N. D. 

Lake Charles, Louisiana. 
Kansas City, Missouri. 
Cape Town, So. Africa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 



Frank L. Meredith, B. Sc, 

Clarice (McCarthy) McNaughton, B. L., Eagle G'lowa. 

Wilton McCarthy, D. V .M., 5th and Walnut Sts, 

Des Moines, Iowa. 



E. S. McCord, D. V. M., Delmar Jc, 

W. P. Milburn, B. M. E., Eby, 

Gordon P. Miller, B. Sc, Des Moines, 

C. R. Molison, D. V. M., Graettinger, 

Jennie (Morrison) Beyer. B .Sc, Ames, 



Fred R. Muhs, B. C. E. 



St. Louis, 



Fred S. Phelps, B. Sc, 332 Washington Boulv., 



Kate M. Porter, B. L., 



Idaho City, 



Henry Replogle ,D. V. M., 385 S. Hermitage Ave 

Jerry Replogle, D. V. M., Centerville, 

John A. Rolfs, B. Sc, Eldridge, 
T. T. Rutledege, B. Ag., 

J. F. Saylor, B. Sc, Spokane, 

Robt. Sloan, B. Sc, Geneva, 

Louis B. Spinney, B. M. E., M., Ames, 

Fred C. Stewart, B. Sc, M. Sc, Geneva, 



Iowa. 

California. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Missouri. 

Chicago, 111. 

Idaho. 

, Chicago, 111. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

P. I. 

Washington 

Nebraska. 

Iowa. 

New York. 



336 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Arthur C. Stokes, B. Sc., Omaha, Nebraska. 

*C. B. Swenson, B. Sc. 

Walter E. Trotter, B. M. E., 339 5th Ave., Pittsburg, Penn. 

O. C. Van Houten, B. Agr., Lincoln, Nebraska. 

H. C. Wallace, B. Agr., Des Moines, Iowa. 

G. S. Waterhouse, D. V. M., Farley, Iowa. 

Hugh H. West, D. V. M., Spurling Bldg., Elgin, Illinois. 

Elmina T. Wilson, B. C. E., C. E..Ames, Iowa. 

Flora H. Wilson, B. L., Washington, D. C. 

Vincent Zmunt, B. Sc, Iowa City, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1893. 



Frank W. Austin, B. C. E., Spencer, Iowa. 

Bert Benjamin, B. M. E., 1182 S. Lawndale Ave., Chicago.Ill. 

E. C. Boutelle, B. M. E., Ames, Iowa. 

C. E. Brown, B .M. E., Peterboro, Ont., Canada. 

A. Alene (Chestek) Stewart, B. L., 48 Brook St., Geneva, N.Y. 

D. G. Cooper. D. V. M., 2626 Capitol Ave., Omaha, Nebraska. 
Virginia H. Corbett, B. L., Bozeman, Montana. 

F. E. Davidson, B. C. E., 6740 Madison Ave., 

Grand Crossing, Chicago, Illinois. 
C. M. Day, D. V. M., St. Joseph, Missouri. 

Earl Douglas, B. Sc, Brookings, S. D. 

Jennie Downing, B. L., Hampton, Iowa. 

Edwin M. Duroe, Sioux Rapids, Iowa. 

R. H Fairfield, B. Ag., Creston, Iowa. 

Kate M. Farr, B. L., Bozeman, Montana. 

E. E. Faville, B. Ag., Doylestown, Penn. 
J. H. Gasson, D. V. M., Mo. Valley, Iowa. 
Margaret I. (Gifford) Hodson, B. L., Ames, Iowa. 
Ernest F. Green, B. Sc, Des Moines, Iowa. 
J. LeRoy Guernsey, B. C. E., 

W. E. Harriman, B. Sc, M. D., Ames, Iowa. 

C. E. Hart, B. M. E., Davenport, Iowa. 

W. E. Herring, B. C. E., 224 Bowen St., St. Louis, Missouri. 

Royal T. Hodgkins, B. M. E., New York City.N. Y. 

Jessie B. Hudson, B. Sc, B. L., Lansing, Iowa. 

Geo. W. Hursey. B. Sc. TLcnlrick, Towa. 

Jno. A. James, B. Sc, 3883 Wash. Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 

J. F. Jones, B. Sc, Iowa City, Iowa. 

Edward J. Kearney, B. M. E., Cor. Lake & Clinton St., 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 
Frerl L. Kent, B. Ag., Corvallis, Oregon. 

G. A. Ketterer, .B Sc, Circle City, Alaska. 



'Deceri 



Bed, 



LIST OF GRADUATES. 337 

G. A. Kuehl, B. C. E., 933 Turner Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
\Villis B. Lincoln, D. V. M., Nashville, Tennessee. 

Willard C. Lusk, B. Sc., Yankton, So. Dakota. 

J. A. Maguire, B. Sc, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

P. J. Maguire, B .Sc, 1302-100 Washington St., Chicago, 111. 
Berthold W. Manville, B. E. E., 1104 Ella St., Beatrice, Neb. 
C. A. McCall, D. V. M., Kansas City, Kansas. 

F. B. McCall, D. V. M., 6550 South St., Peoria, Illinois. 

G. E. McKim, B. C. E., St. Joseph, Missouri. 
Ira J. Merrill, B. M. E., Sterling, Illinois. 
Chas. L. Miles, B .Sc, Charles City, Iowa. 
Grace Mills, B. L., Flandreau, So. Dakota. 
Ella B. (Morton) Kearney, B. L., Cor. Lake & Clinton St., 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

C. K. Munns, B. E. E., M. S., in E. E., Corningjowa. 
H. H. Nichols, B. Sc, Ackley, Iowa. 

D. W. Patton, D. V. M„ 822 E. 48th St., Chicago, Illinois. 
Florence G. (Parkhili) Kuehl, B. L., B. Sc, 933 Turner Ave., 

Chicago, Illinois. 
Lavenia Price, B. Sc, Cor. 18 and Center Sts., Des Moinesja. 
Helen Radnich, B. L., Davis City, Iowa. 

Roscoe G. Rice, B. E. E., 237 30th St., Chicago, Illinois. 
Mary C. Rolfs, B. L., Fairfield, Illinois. 

Wilmot G. Rundall, B. Sc, Buffalo, New York. 

E. E. Smith, B. Sc, Sioux Rapids, Iowa. 
*Evelyn E. Starr, B .Sc, B. L. 

F. S. Tuns, D. V. M., 5726 S. Green St., Chicago, Illinois. 
Belle (Wentch) Wood, B. Sc, Iowa. 

B. F. White, D. V. M., Ames, Iowa. 

Vinnie (Williams) Grattan, B. L., Medford, O. T. 

GRADUATES OF 1894. 

W. J. Ballard, B. Sc, Irvington, Iowa. 

Cassie Pearl Bigelow, B. L., 568 Chapel St., N. Haven, Conn. 

O. N. Bossingham, D. V. M., Algona, Iowa. 

Harry S. Bowen, B. M. E., 6463 Minerva Ave., Chicago, 111. 

S. D. Bowie, B. Ag., Chelan, Wash. 

Blanch M. (Bradley) White, B.L.,Ames, Iowa. 

W. J. Burdess, B. M. E., Oskaloosa, Iowa. 

L. Iowa Campbell, B. L., Newton, Iowa. 

W. Lee Campbell, B. M. E., 504 Dyer Bldg., Augusta, Ga. 

Frank H. Campbell, B. M. E., Fort Worth, Texas. 

W. G. Carlson, B. Sc, Willow Lake, So. Dakota. 

G. W. Carver, B. Ag., Tuskegee, Alabama. 
Ida M. (Clark) Campbell, B. L., Clear Lake, Iowa. 

♦Deceased. 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Louis B. Craig, B. M. E., 

Ella B. Curtis, B. L., 

Fannie E. (Curtiss) Craig, B 

W. R. Cooper, B. Sc., 

E. C. Dickinson, B. M. E 

S. R. Fitz, B. Sc, 

Annie W. Fleming, B. Sc, 

Anna Georgen, B. L., 

W. H. Gemmill, B. Sc, 

Emil Hensen, B. M. E., 

Alvin W. Hoyt, B. Sc, 1402 A 

Winifred Hunter, B. L., 

Burton D. Knickerbocker, B 



Newport News, Virginia. 

Independence, Iowa. 
L., Newport News Virginia. 

Newton, Iowa. 

495 Laurel, Elgin, Illinois. 

Steamb'tRock, Iowa. 

Ames, Iowa. 

Worthington, Iowa. 

Sigourney, Iowa. 

Great Falls, Montana. 

Ave., Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Ames, Iowa. 

M. E., 1233 Jackson Boulv., 

Chicago, Illinois. 



H. R. Kreger, B. Sc, 
W. G. Langfitt, B. M. E., 
C. G. Lee, B. Sc, 
Charles Lincoln, B. M. E., 
Scott \v. Linn, B. M. E., 
E. M. S. McLaughlin, B. M. E., 
Alex. McKinnon, B. M. E., 
W. L. Meinzer, B. Sc, 
John Meissner, B. Sc, 
J. C. Miller, B. C. E., 
H. G. Moore, D. V. M., 
Bertha M. Mosier, B. L., 



Bloomfield, Nebraska. 
Hutchinson, Minnesota. 
Ames, Iowa. 

Hommgan LuzPhilippine I 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



Newton, 

Windsor, 

Howard, 

Leighton, 

Galesburg, 

Cudahy, 

Linden, 



Iowa. 

Connecticut 

So. Dakota. 

Iowa. 

No. DaKOia. 

Wisconsin. 

Iowa. 



W. A. Murphy, B. M. E., 1527 S. 12th St., St. Joseph, Mo. 
Emma (Pammel) Hansen, B. L., M. Sc, Brookings, S. D. 
Nora M. (Person) Sanborn, B. L., 25 Galena Blk., 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 
A. A. Peters ,D. V. M., Winterset, Iowa. 

Albert M. Price, B. M. E., 376 Washington Boulv., 

Chicago, Illinois. 
C. E .Read, B. Agr., 
C. D. Reed, B. Ag., 
Herbert Rutledge, B. M. E., 
Edith B. (Ryan) Faville, B. L 



NewVirginia, Iowa. 
Vicksburg, Miss. 
Koszta, Iowa. 

Doylestown, Pennsylvania. 



W. L. Ryan, B. Sc, 1301 lOtb St., Des Moines, Iowa. 

Geo. T. Schlenker, B. Sc, 

A. H. Seaver, B. C. E., 

Harry Shanks, D. V. M., 

Maha (Silliman) Munns, B. L., Corning 

Emma F. Sirrine, B. Sc, M. Sc 

H. J. Stevens, D. V. M., 

A. W. Stuntz, B. E. E., 

rinrence Van Epps, B. Sc, 

Arthur R. Wake, D. V. M., 

Carter B. Weaver, B. Sc, 



Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


Nashville, 


Iowa. 


Millersburg, 


Iowa. 


Corning, 


Iowa. 


Dysart, 


Iowa. 


Owensburg, 


Kentucky. 


Clinton, 


Iowa. 


Kansas City, 


Missouri. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 



LIST OF GRADUATES. 



Carter B. Weaver, B. Sc., Ames, Iowa. 

Alda Wilson, B. C. E., 500 Belden Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 

Ellsworth Wilson, D. V. M., Jewell, Iowa. 

Elvin J. Wilson, D. V. M., Nortiix^nglish, Iowa. 

C. O. Williamson, B. E. E., 14 W. 4th St., St. Paul, Minn. 

J. T. Young, B. M. E., Milton, No. Dakota. 



GRADUATES OF 1895. 



Humboldt, 



Iowa. 



Arthur J. Ashby, B. E. E., 
Florence A. (Baker) McManus, B. Sc, 1162 E. Pierce St., 

Council Bluffs, Iowa. 



Elmer D. Ball, B. Sc, 
A. J. Banks, B. M. E., 
A. W. Bitting, D. V. M. 



B. S. 



Richard Blanche, D. V. M., 



Ft. Collins, 
Montour, 
Lafayette, 
Kansas City, 



Colo. 
Iowa. 
Indiana. 
Missouri. 



C. E. Brockhausen, B. M. E., 31 Groveland Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Ira C. Brownlie, B. Sc, D. D. S., Ames, Iowa. 

J. W. Crawford, B. Sc, Fort Morgan, Colo. 

Erne J. (Curtiss) Campbell, B. L., Fort Worth, Texas. 

J. G. Danielson, B. Ag., Harcourt, Iowa. 

J. R. Davison, B. Sc, Louisville, Kentucky. 

E. T .Davison, D. V. M. 

Ruth (Duncan) Tilden, B. L., 

C. R. Duroe, B. M. E., 

W. J. Eck, B. M 



Iowa. 

Iowa. 



Ames, 

Sioux Rapids, 
E., U. S. A., Transport Kilpatrick, 
Government Pier, Brooklyn, New York. 



C. H. Eckles, B. Ag., M. S. A., Columbia, 

A. H. Foster, B. M. E., New Bedford, 

Frisbee B. Jerome, B. Ag., Sheldon, 

Burt German, B. M. E., Fremont, 

Clarence Goddard, B. C. E. 
W. E. Gossard, B. Sc, 
G. D. Gunn, B. Sc, 
Geo. W. Hardin, B. Sc, 
A. C. Helmer, B. M. E., 

D. M. Hosford, B. E. E 
N. C. Hurst, B. M. E., 

Chas. Stuart Hutchison, B. Sc, M. D., Ames, 
Ira B. Johnson, B. Sc, 
Raymond Johnson, D. V. M 
Fred J. Lazell, B. be, 



Missouri. 
Mass. 
Iowa. 
Ohio. 



C. C. Lewis, B. M. E. 
H. T. Lewis, B. M. E., 



Ames, Iowa. 

Sumner, Nebraska. 

Castle, Montana. 

Davenport, Iowa. 
28 Kenwood St., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Burlington, Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Marne, Iowa. 

Richland, Iowa. 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
Nira, Iowa. 

Burlington, Iowa. 



John W. Lewis, B. C. E., Fort Sheridan, Chicago, Illinois. 



L. L. Lewis, D. V. M., 
G. W. Louthan, B. Ag., 
F. R. Lyford, B. C. E., 



Stillwater, 0. T. 
Linn Grove, Iowa. 
Marshalltown, Iowa. 



840 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Nellie Maguire, B. L., 254 E. 10th St., St. Paul, Minnesota. 
W. R. McCready, B. C. E., 3837 Ellis Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
Mary B. (McNeill) Aten, B. L., Garden Grove, Iowa. 
A. E. Mellinger, B. M. E., Manila, P. I. 

J. H. Meyers, B. Ag., Spokane, Wash. 

Lilian Mills, B. L., Flandreau, S. D. 

J. A. Moore, 4621 Champaign Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. 
Hulda M. Nelson, B. Sc, Gowrie, Iowa. 

Wm. J. Oliver, B. Sc, care Aermotor Co., Chicago, Illinois. 
Merrill J. Orr, B. M. E., 707 14th St., Sioux City, Iowa. 
Mabel Ruth (Owens) Wilcox, B. L., WashingtcD. C. 
Lola A. Placeway, B. Sc, Ames, Iowa. 

*John M. Preston, B. Ag. 

Erwin E. Reed, B. Sc, Monticello, Iowa. 

Thomas L. Rice, D. V. M., 3j1 E. 45th St., Chicago, Illinois. 
W. D. Rich, B. Sc, Ames, Iowa. 

Albert Richmond, B. C. E., Edmunds, No. Dakota. 

F. S. Roop, D. V. M., 214 14th St., Charlottsville, Virginia. 
Ethel B. Rundall, B. Sc, Emmetsburg, Iowa. 

*George D. Sabin, B. M. E. 

J. C. Sample, B. C. E., 175 Howe St, Chicago, Illinois. 
Roger S. Sanborn, B. Sc, 25 Galena Blk., Salt Lake City, U. 
Frank Schleiter, B. E. E., Ames, Iowa. 

J. I. Schulte, B. Ag., 1921 13th St., N. W., Washington, D.C. 
John M. fookol, B. Sc, 708 Monroe St., Chicago, Illinois. 
W. J. Thomas, B. C. E., 128 W. 42nd St., New York, N. Y. 
R. H. Walker, B. M. E., Britt, Iowa. 

Etta J. Whipple, B. Sc, S. Ottumwa, Iowa. 

Chas. A. Wilson, B. Ag., 6401 Parnell Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
E. R. Wilson, B. Ag., Cheney, Wash. 

O. P. Woodburn, B. M. E., Rock Rapids, Iowa. 
John I. Wright, B. Ag., Kilduff, Iowa. 

Laura (Wyatt) Cutler, B. Sc, Harlan, Iowa. 

GBADUATES OF 1896. 

Mildred Anderson, B. L., Webster City, Iowa. 

Carlton, R. Ball, B. Sc, M. Sc, Washington, D. C. 
Hazel Leone (Beardshear) Chambers B. L., 

1323 20th Ave., Denver, Colorado. 
J. F. Blackmore, B. C. E., Bedford, Iowa. 

Elmer N. Bonnell, B. Sc, Davenport, Iowa. 

W. A. Bryan, B. Sc, Honolulu, H. I. 

Agnes M. Cole, B. Sc, Ames, Iowa. 

*Robert Combs, B .Sc, M. Sc 
Bert Dunham, B. E. E., 504 Dyer Bldg., Augusta, Georgia. 

*Decea ed 



LIST OF GKADUATES. 



341 



Raymond B. Eckles, B. Ag., Doylestown, Perm. 

J. J. Edgerton, B. Ag., Ames, Iowa. 

James W. Elliott, B. C. E., Toledo, Ohio. 

Nettie A. Fibbs, B. C. E., 1212 5th Ave., Fort Dodge, Iowa. 
Edith (Foster) Orr, B. Sc., 707 14th St., Sioux City, Iowa. 
Ella Weed (French) Robinson, B. Sc, Alexandeilowa. 
Frank E. French, B. C. E., No. 1 W. Kenzie St., Chicago, 111. 
L. M. Goodman, B. M. E., Britt, Iowa. 

Maud Hursey, B. L., Moravia, Iowa. 

C. P. Johnson, B. Sc, 313 E. 11th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
C. F. Langlass, B M. E., 608 W. 113 St., New York City, N.Y. 
Robert R. Landon, B. M. E., 1115 G St., N. W., Wash., D. C. 
Myrtle (Little) Fowler, B. L., Ames, Iowa. 

Nora Lockwood, B. Sc, George, Iowa. 

Elbert C. Macy, B. C. E., care Chicago Great- Western 

St. Paul, Minnesota. 
Stella (McLain) Lawrence, B. L., Boone, Iowa. 

Carl H. McLean, B. Ag., M. Ph., Ann Arbor, Mich. 
T. J. Mahoney, B. Sc, Boone, Iowa. 

♦Watson Mason, B. M. E. 

Fred W .Mathews, B. Sc, Jefferson, Iowa. 

Ira J. Mead, B. Ag., M. S. A., Ames, Iowa. 

Claude C. Mills, B. Sc, Linden, Iowa. 

S. B. Mills, B .Ag., Ames, Iowa. 

C. O. Pool, B. Sc, Bedford, Iowa. 

Lillian Porterfield, B. Sc, 
Herbert L. Preston, B. Sc, 
Ivan B. Roscoe, B. Sc, Portsmoutn, Iowa. 

Rose (Rummel) Smith, B. Sc, Ames, Iowa. 

E. A. Sherman, B. Sc, Fort Dodge, Iowa. 

Chas. H. Speers, B. M. E., Oxford, Iowa. 

Geo. L. Steelsmith, B. Sc, Dawson City, Aiaska. 

Henry C. Taylor, B. Ag., Madison, Wisconsin. 

Robert G. Weaver, B. Sc, NewYorkCity, New York. 

W. W. Wentch, B. M. E., care Chicago Telephone Co., 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Gilmore City, Iowa. 
Brocksburg, Nebraska. 



B. W. Wilson, B. Ag., 



Butte, 



Montana. 



James W. Wilson, B. Ag., M. Ag., 2101 S. St., N. W., 

Washington, D. C. 
Storm Lake, Iowa. 
Cheyenne, Wyoming. 



Arthur L. Kinzer, B. Sc 
Geo. W. Zorn, B. C. E., 



GRADUATES OF 1897. 

Mary Ellen Barger, B. Sc, Ontario, Iowa. 

C. A. Bergeman, B. M. E., Grand Works, Illinois. 

E. C. Bierbaum, B. Sc, Rolla, Missouri. 



*D ceased. 



342 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Frank W. Bouska, B. Ag., Ames, Iowa. 

Guy S. Brewer, B. Sc, 394 W. 13th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Andrew Brown, B. Sc., Whitaker Bldg., Davenport, Iowa. 
Jas. R. Burnip, B. Sc, Marathon, Iowa. 

Orange R. Cole, B. E. E., St. Joseph, Missouri. 

Robert A. Craig, D. V. M., Lafayette, Indiana. 

Philip E. Damon, B. Ag., St. Louis, Missouri. 

Geo. Dana, B. M. E., 921 Main St., Racine, Wisconsin. 
Ole Davidson, B. C. E., 6246 Stony Island Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Gwendolen (Doxsee) Reed, B. L., Monticello, Iowa. 
Louis A. Duroe, B. Sc, Sioux Rapids, Iowa. 

L. Mae (Fellows) Banks, B. L., Montour, Iowa. 

Wallace C. Gaberson, B. Sc, 904 9th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Otto H. Gersbach, B.C. E., 6246 Stony Island Ave., 

Chicago, Illinois. 
Blanche E. (Greeley) Wilson, B.L., 6401 Parnell Ave., 

Chicago, Illinois. 
Glenn D. Heald, B. M. E., Farley, Iowa. 

Margaret Jones, B. Sc, 230 Ewing St., Chicago, Illinois. 
Ward M. Jones, B. C. E., Ames, Iowa. 

Wm. S. Joseph, B. C. E., York, Nebraska. 

Robert E. King, B. E. E., Ames, Iowa. 

Helen L. Knapp, B. L., Lake Charles, Louisiana. 

Edwin P. Kribbs, B. Sc, in Min. E., Grave, Oregon. 
Chas. E. LeBuhn, B. Sc, Davenport, Iowa. 

Frank W. Linebaugh, B. M. E., Ames, Iowa. 

Thomas W. Mast, B. Ag., Mt. vernon, S. D. 

Frank McConnon, B. Sc, Monticello, Iowa. 

George B. McWnliams, B. C. E., Waterloo, Iowa. 

Elizabeth A. (Morphy)Tilden, B. L., Ames, Iowa. 
Joseph S. Morrison, B. C. E., Boone, Iowa. 

Wilmon Newell, B. Sc, M. Sc, Wooster, Ohio. 

Iowa. 



Ernest A. Pattengill, B. S. 



Ames, 



Geo. W. Patterson, B. M. E., 257 Rice St., St. Paul, Minn. 

Allen Rae, B. M. E., 

Ediin Redmon, B. L., 

Emerson G. Reed, B. E. E., 

Edw. F. Rhodenbaugh, B. Sc 

Ambrose C. Rice, B. Sc, 



London, England 

HighlandCente iowa. 
Knoxville, Iowa. 

Denison, 
Des Moines 
Goodell, 



Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

No. Dakota. 

Iowa. 



Moss F. Rolfe, B. Sc, 

Margaret H. Rutherford, B. Sc, Crystal, 

Arthur F. Sample, B. Ag., Lebanon, 

Herman T. Schmidt, B. E. E., 1342 W. 3rd St., Davenport, la. 

Frank B. Spencer, B. E. E., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Geo. L. Stearns, B. E. E., Eagle Grove, Iowa. 

Olive E. Stevens, B. L., Ames, Iowa. 

Clarence E. Tanton, B. Sc, Orange City, Iowa. 



LIST OF GRADUATES. 



343 



Hannah M. Thomas, B. Sc., 
Minta A. (Tilden) Macy, B. L., 
Edwin R. Townsend, B. M. E., 
John James Vernon, B. Ag., M. 
Ida L. Watkins, B. L., 
Jasper Wilson, B. Ag., 
Lawrence Winne, B. Sc, 
Clarence A. Hartman, B. Sc, 



Corning, Iowa. 

Ames, Iowa. 

20 Ave., Rapp, Paris, France. 
Sc, Messila Park, N. Mexico. 

GrundyCenter, Iowa. 

Washington, D. C. 

Humboldt, Iowa. 

Mo. Valley, Iowa. 



GRADUATES OF 1898. 



West Liberty, Iowa. 



Ontario, 


Iowa. 


Champaign, 


Illinois. 


Davenport, 


Iowa. 


Viola Center, 


Iowa. 


Roland, 


Iowa. 


Schenectady, 


New York 



Moses C. Adamson, B. Sc, Madrid, Iowa. 

Ralph W. Barclay, B. Ag., 

Amanda J. Barger, B. Sc, 

Esther Beatty, B. L., 

John N. Bonnell, B. Sc, 

Leora May Bonwell, B. Sc, 

Otis S. Boyd, B. Sc, 

Harvey D. Bozarth, B. M. E., 

Cyrus J. Bristol, B. M. E., 1132 26th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 

Harry J. Brown, B. Sc, Courtney, No. Dakota. 

John C. Brown, B. Ag., M. Sc, 420 Francis St., Madison, Wis. 

Olive Z. Brown, B. L., 609 23rd and L. Sts., So. Omaha, Neb. 

Ena M. (Burnham) Eckles, B. L., Doylestown, Pennsylvania. 

Glenn C. Clark, B. Sc, Belmond, Iowa. 

Margaret M. Cooper, B. L., Magnolia, Iowa. 

John Craig, B. Ag., Ithaca, New York. 

W. J. Devine, B. E. E., 235 7th Avenue, Clinton, Iowa. 

Gordon F. Dodge, B. M. E., 271 E. 62nd St., Chicago 111. 

Will S. Duncan, B. Sc, 2435 W. Ohio St., Chicago, Illinois. 

St. Louis, Missouri. 

Iowa City, Iowa. 

Ames, 

Philadelphia, 

Humboldt, 



Harry E. Dyer, B. Sc, 
Willis C .Edson, B. Sc, 
Ada Ellis, B. L., 
Sadie Ellis, B. L., 
Harry J. Evans, B. Ag., 
Frederick Faville, B. Sc, 



Storm Lake, 



Iowa. 
Penn. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 



Oliver J. Fay, B. Sc, care Augustina Hospital, Chicago, 111. 



Elmer Franklin, B. Sc, 
Orville S. Franklin, B. Sc, 
James Galloway, B. M. E., 
Thomas Galloway, B. M. E., 
Theron S. Grant, B. Sc, 



Platteville, 
Mitchellville, 
Milwaukee, 
Burlington, 



Iowa. 
Iowa. 

Wisconsin. 
Iowa. 



BoxElderPark, Wyoming. 



Howard N. Grettenberg, B. Ag., M. Sc, Ames, Iowa. 

J. H. Grisdale, B. Ag., Ottawa, Ontario. 

Wm. H. Grover, B. E. E., Sac City, Iowa. 

Hahlon J. Hammer, B. C. E., Newton, Kansas. 

Chas. J. Heckard, D. V. M., Wheatland, Iowa. 



344 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Ole J. Henderson, B. Sc., 610 N. Y. Life Bldg., 

Minneapolis, Minnesota. 



Wisconsin. 
D. C. - 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Illinois. 



Be'nj. H* Hibbard, B. Ag., Madison, 

Elmer R. Hodson, B. Sc, M. Sc., Washington, 

Ralph H. Hollenbeak, B. C. E., Casey, 

Sarah C. Hook, B. L., Ames, 

Monroe R. Hull, B. Sc, B. M. E., Chicago, 

Ewing M. Johnson, B. Sc, Greene, Butler County, Iowa. 

Irene Jones, B. Sc, Manchester, Iowa. 

Axel Rolling, D. V. M., Hawkeye, Iowa. 

John C. Kyle, B. E. E., Ames, Lowa. 

Fred R. Lowery, B. Sc, B. M. E., 1315 W. 26th St., 

Des Moines, Iowa. 
Kate La Rue, B. L., Van Horn. Iowa. 

Fred N. Lewis, B. C. E., Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Edward E. Little, B. Ag., M. S. A., Ames, Iowa. 

John B. Love, B. Ag., Byron, Illinois. 

C. J. McCusker, B. Sc, 644 Harrison St., Chicago, Illinois. 
Willis McKay, B. Sc, Omaha. Nebraska. 

Pearl McWilliams, B. Sc, Waterloo, Iowa. 

W. H. Meek, B. Sc, Scranton, Iowa. 

Royal Meeker, B. Sc, 363 W. 123d St., New York City, N. Y. 
Roger C. Mills, B. Ag., Alta, Iowa. 

David W. Morgan, B. E. E., U. S. Monterey, Manila, P. I. 
George E. Nesom, D. V. M., B. Sc, Clemson College, S. C. 
Jessie J. Parker, B. Sc, 
A. J. Perrin, B. C. E., 
Eugene D. Perry, B. Sc, 
Marius J. Pos, B. M. E., 
Ellson G. Preston, B. Ag., 
Elizabeth (Read) Cohn, B. L. 
Alice E. Reed, B. L., 
O. W. Rowe, D. V. M., 
Stella M. Russell, B. L., 
Joseph Harry Scurr, B. Ag., 
Henry W. Skinner, B. M. E., 
Dollie M. Snelson, B. Sc, 
Edwin M. Stanton, B. Sc, 
Frank C. Stetzel, B. Sc, 802 Nicolett Ave., Minneapolis, Min 
C. T. Stevens, B. Sc, Alden, Iowa. 

Mabelle T. Stewart, B. L., GilbertSta'n, Iowa. 

Simon W. Tarr, B. C. E., 18 George St., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Margaret M. Taylor, B. L., 
Wm. C. Tilden, B. Sc, 
Harry E. Titus, D. V. M., 
Annie M. Walker, B. Sc, 
Wm. W. Warden, B. Ag., 



Ames, 


Iowa. 


Wall Lake, 


Iowa. 


Ann Arbor, 


Michigan. 


Cleveland, 


Iowa. 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Monticello, 


Iowa. 


Utica, 


Iowa. 


Storm Lake, 


Iowa. 


Gilman, 


Iowa. 


Osage, 


Iowa. 


Massena, 


Iowa. 



Philadelphia, Penn. 



Olin, 


Iowa. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Maxwell, 


Iowa. 


Osage, 


Iowa. 


Van Cleve, 


Iowa. 



LIST OF GRADUATES. 



345 



Lorena Webber, B. Sc., Renwick, Iowa. 

Alvah P. Whitmore, B. Ag., 1214 Farnam St., Omaha, Neb. 
Ira A. Williams, B. Sc, Ames, Iowa. 

John H. Wykoff, B. C. E., Ames, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1899. 



Howard W. Adams, B. Sc, 5492 Ellis Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
J. Randolph Allen, B. Sc, Crookstown, Minn. 

R. C. Anderson, B. M. E., 318 Hanover St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Herbert B. Bolks, B. Sc, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

George W. Brooks, B. Sc, in E. E., 1275 West Polk St., 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Clare A. Campbell, B. Sc, 



Dixon, 



Illinois. 



Elsie B. (Davis) Malcolm, B. Ph., 2038 Clarendon Ave., 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Judson W. Deering, B. C. E. 
Howard L. Eckles, B. Sc, 
Fannie Ora Edgett, B. Sc, 
George L. Ehlers, B. Sc, 
Henry O. Fritzel, B. Sc, 
Lucy A. Giffen, B. Ph., 
Fannie M. Gilbert, B. Ph., 



715 Lunt Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Marshalltown, Iowa. 



Ames, 

Plymouth, 

Conrad, 

Brooklyn, 

GilbertSta'n, 



Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

New York. 

Iowa. 

Alaska. 

Nebraska. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Colorado. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Wisconsin. 



John L. Gillespie, B. Sc. in E. E.,Cape Nome, 

A. R. Glaisyer, D. V. M., Omaha, 

Katherine Goble, B. Ph., Ames, 

Racine D. Goble, B. Sc, Ames, 

Ernest E. Granger, B. Sc, Ames, 

Clarence J. Griffith, B. S. A., Fort Collins, 

Walter I. Griffith, B. S. A., Millersburg, 

Roland O. Hayter, B. M. E., Mason City, 

Alice Ward Hess, B. Sc, Ames, 

Laurence Hodson, B. C. E., Ames, 

Dennis E. Hollingsworth, B. S. A., Peru, . 

Arthur G. Hopkins, B. S. A., Madison, 

John C. Horning, B. Sc. in E. E., 1221 Marquette Bldg., 

Chicago, Illinois. 
H. Harold Hume, B. S. A., Lake City, Florida. 

Edward W. Humphrey, D. V. M., Spinson, Iowa. 

M. S. Hyland, B. Sc. in E. E., 661 Burlington St., Chicago,Ill. 
W. J. Kennedy, B. S. A., Ames, Iowa. 

William H. Leathers, B. Sc, Mapleton, Iowa. 

C. P. Liegorot, D. V. M., Villisca, Iowa. 

John P. Lund, B. Sc, St. Ansgar, Iowa. 

Erna Maguire, B. Sc, Bloomington Prairie, Minnesota. 

Norman J. Malcom, B. Sc, 2038 Clarendon Ave., 

Chicago, Illinois. 



346 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Walter S. Marston, B. M. E., St. Louis, Missouri. 

Floyd H. McQuiston, B. Sc. in E. E., 293 Oak St., Chicago.IlI. 
Edith I. Metcalf, B. Ph., Correctionvillelowa. 

Ethel Ray Mills, B. Ph., OklahomaCity, Okla. 

Ruth Morrison, B. Ph., Hedrick, Iowa. 

Fay I. Nichols, B. C. E., Des Moines, Iowa. 

George D. Nicoll, B. Sc. in E. E., Schenectady, New York. 
Thomas E. Nicoll, B. Sc. in E. E., Ida Grove, Iowa. 
Chester M .Perrin, B. Sc, 
Russell Read, B. Sc, 
Frank J. Rettermaier, B. Sc, 
Harry V. Rice, B. Sc. in E. E. 
Charles Rhinehart, B. S. A., 
Fordyce W. Rhodes, B. Sc, 
Guy Roberts, B. Sc, 
Burton R. Rogers, D. \. M., 4905 Calumet Ave., Chicago, 111. 
George M. Rommel, B. S. A., "Washington, D. C. 
Charles F. Rottler, B. Sc, 615 Oak Park Ave., Des Moines,Ia. 
Harry W. Sayles, B. Sc. in E. E., Peoria, Illinois. 

D. J. Scholten, B. Sc, Alton, Iowa. 

Frank A. Schuetz, B. Sc, NewHampton, Iowa. 

Annie O. (Seaver) Seaver, B. Ph.,Beloit, Wisconsin. 

George A. Smith, B. C. E., Des Moines, Iowa. 

S. P. Smith ,D. V. M., 1712 Michigan Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
C. F. Spring, B. Sc, Ames, Iowa. 

Carl A. Steele, B. S. A., Ogden, Iowa. 

Wayne Stillman, D. V. M., 500 Alma St., Austin, Illinois. 



Ames, 


Iowa. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Carroll, 


Iowa. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Dallas Center 


Iowa. 


Custer, 


Washington 


Marathon, 


Iowa. 



James M. Stimson, B. Sc, 

Frederick V. Stout, B. S. A 

Adele H. Stuhr, B. Ph., 

Earl R. Thomas, B. Sc, 

Alice M. Tooley, B. Ph., 

Mary Tooley, B. Ph., 

Elbert B. Tuttle, B. Sc. in E. E., Ames, 

J. Edgar Van Liew, B. Sc. in E. E., Toledo 

Maude Wakefield, B. Ph., 

Roy A. Walker, B. Sc. in E. E., 312 E. 9th St., 

Des Moines, Iowa 
John C. Welch, B. Sc. in E. E., 
Jeannette M. Younie, B. Sc, 



Conway, Iowa. 

Parkersburg, Iowa. 
Clermont, Iowa. 

New Rockf ord, No. Dakota. 
NewHampton, Iowa. 
Washington, D. C. 

Iowa. 

Ohio. 
Ames, Iowa. 



Schenectady, New York. 
Odebolt, Iowa. 



GRADUATES OP 1900. 



Linton P. Bennett, B. Sc, Maryetta, Washington. 

Frank S. Bone, B. Sc, Hopeville, Iowa. 

John W. Bunker, B. S. A., Chicago, Illinois. 

Melville Gumming, B. S. A., Truro, Canada. 



LIST OF GRADUATES. 



347 



William E. Day, D. V. M., 
Charles W. Deming, D. V. M., 
Leroy L. Diller, B. S. A., 
Ella E. Down, B. Ph., 
Maude F. Eastwood, B. Ph., 
*Charles A. Egger, B. Sc. in E. E. 
Charles Elmer Ellis, B. S. A., Ames 
Estella Ellis, B. Ph., 
Fred W. Faurot, B. Sc, 



So. St. Joseph, Missouri. 
Portland, Oregon. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Ames, Iowa. 

Salt Lake City,Utah. 



Iowa. 
Marshalltown, Iowa. 



St. Louis, 

Archibald L. Haecker, B. S. A., Lincoln, 

Ames, 
Denison, 
Norway, 
Ames, 



Hattie Has Brouck, B. Ph., 

Paul Henson, B. Sc, 

William A. Houghton, B. S. A 

Delia M. Johnson, B. Ph., 

Samuel P. Johnson, B.Sc. in E.E.,Paton, 

Western L. Johnson, D. V. M., 108 W. 12th St 

Birdie C. Kegley, B. Sc, Ames, 

Susa A. Kelsey, B. Ph., Manchester, 

Addie L Knight, B. Ph., Ames, 

Edwin G. LeClere, B. Sc, Chillicothe. 

Sybil Mehitable Lentner, B. Sc, Ottumwa, 

Martin Lewis, B. M. E., St. Paul, 

John H. Love, D. V. M., Des Moines, 

Frederick R. Marshall, B. S. A., Ames, 

William H. Mast, B. S. A., Washington, 

John Francis McBirney, B. Sc. inE. E., Ames, 

Wilson F. McDill, B. S. A., Creston, 

Alexander D. McKinley, B. Sc, Waterloo, 

Nellie M. Nicholas, B. Ph., 

Berte C. Nowlan, B. Sc. in E. E 

A. Estella Paddock, B. Sc, 

Henry J. Palmer, B. S. A., 

Foster F. Parker, D. V. M., 

Sophia Schott, B. Ph., 

Ira J. Scott, B. Sc, 

Frisbie T. Suit, D. V. M., 

Hall H. Thomas, B. Sc, 

Charles S. White, B. Sc, 

Evahn R. Walker, B. Sc, 

Wilbur M. Wilson, B. M. E., 



Montezuma, 

Havelock, 

Ames, 

Ames, 

Oskaloosa, 

What Cheer 

Des Moines. 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Decorah, Iowa. 

Audubon, Iowa. 

Ames, Iowa. 

West Liberty, Iowa. 



Missouri. 
Nebraska. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Pueblo, Colo. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Texas. 
Iowa. 

Minnesota. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
D. C. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Towa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 



Roy W. Wortman, B. Sc. in E. E., 113 Loomis St., 

Chicago, Illinois. 

GRADUATES OF 1901. 



Jacob Blumer, B. S. A., 
Merle C. Crane, B. S. A., 
Herbert C, Eckles, B. S. A. 



Luverne, Iowa. 

Ames, Iowa. 

Marshalltown, Iowa. 



348 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



W. D. Fitzwater, B. Sc., Des Moines, Iowa. 

Herman F. Garver, B. C. E., Farmington, Iowa. 
C. Earl Gray, B. S. A., Col. Junction, Iowa. 

Ernest H. Hall, B. S. A., Iowa City, Iowa. 

Henry S. Hopkins, B. S. A., American Casen Co., New York 
Jas. F. Horner, B. S. A., St. Louis, Missouri. 

Ole Hovland, B. Sc. in E. E., 372 W. Monroe St., Chicago, 111. 
Roland J. Kinzer, B. S. A., Odebolt, Iowa. 

Willis E. Lamb, B. Sc. in E. E., 372 W. Monroe St., 

Chicago, Illinois. 
Jay C. Lathrop, B. C. E., Garner, Iowa. 

James Madsen, D. V. M., Ames, Iowa. 

F. G. Miller, B. S. A., Red Oak, Iowa. 

Edgar C. Myers, B. S. A., Ames, Iowa. 

Rufus C. Obrecht, B. S. A., Lafayette, Indiana. 

Elmer Peshak, B. Sc. in E. E., Atlanta, Georgia. 

Hattie A. Pike, B. Sc, Ames, Iowa. 

Harry R. Porter, B. S. A., Live Stock Report, Chicago, 111. 



Edw. E. Savre, B. Sc. in E. E. 
Geo. F. Sokol, B. S. A., 
Ernest D. Stivers, B. Sc, 
Geo. A. Taylor, B. C. E., 
Jno. Edgar Van Liew, B. C. E. 
Dan A. Wallace, B. S. A., 
E. H. Webster, B. S. A., 



113 Loomis St., Chicago, 111. 



Onslow, 
Mason City, 
Newton, 
Des Moines, 
Des Moines, 
Topeka, 



Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Kansas 



INDEX. 



Academic Year, Admission to, 28 
Accredited Schools, 39 
Advanced Standing, 51 
Agriculture, Division of. 61 
Agriculture, Faculty of, 58 
Agriculture, Four Years' Course in 

95 
Agriculture, Practical, 62 

Agriculture Club, 91 

Agricultural Chemistry, Depart- 
ment of, 80 

Agrostology, 242 

Algebra 219 

Algebra, Advanced, 220 

Alternating Currents, 180, 230 

Alumni, Roster of, 321 

Ames and the College, 22 

Anatomy, Comparative, 250 

Anatomy of Domestic Animals, 115 

Animal Husbandry, Department of, 
72 

Animal Nutrition, 76 

Animals, Evolution of, 249 

Assaying, 237 

Astronomy, Practical, 170 

Bacteriology, 242 

Bacteriology of Milk, 69 

Blow-Pipe Analysis, 236 

Bookkeeping, 69 

Botany, Department of, 239 

Botany, 240 

Botany, Cryptogramic, 241 

Botany, Economic, 243 

Breeding Principles of, 75 

Buildings, 23 

Butter Starters, 68 

Butter and Cheese Scoring, 70 

Calculus, 224 

Calendar for 1901-1902, 3 

Ceramics, 190 

Ceramics, Two Years' Course in, 197 

Cheese Making, 70 

Chemistry, Agricultural Depart- 
ment, 80 

Chemistry of Clays and Glazes, 85 

Chemistry, Elementary Dairy, 83 

Chemistry, Elementary Mineral, 84 

Chemistry, General, 236 

Chemistry, General, Department of, 
232 

Chemistry, Inorganic, 234 

Chemistry, Mineral and Geological, 
85 

Chemistry, Organic, 236 



Chemistry, Organic, Relating to Ag- 
riculture, 83 

Chemistry, Organic, Relating to En- 
gineering, 86 

Chemistry, Physiological, 237 

Chemistry, Technical, 86 

Chemistry of Clays, 85 

Chemistry of the Household, 236 

Civil Engineering, Course in, 172 

Civil ; Engineering, Department of, 

i55 
Classification, 43 
Clays, Chemistry of, 85 
Clinics, 130 
Cooking, 259 

Courses of Study and Degrees, 49 
Cytology, Vegetable, 243 
Dairying, Department of, 64 
Dairying, Farm, 71 
Dairying, One Year's Course in, 66 
Dairying, Summer School in, 67 
Dairy Chemistry, 70 
Dairy Machinery, 69 
Dairy Practice, 68 
Dairy Stock Feeding, 70 
Dairy Stock Judging, 69 
Debating, 269 
Dentistry, 128 
Designing, Machine, 149 
Designing, Electrical, 182 
Designing, Structural, 168 
Differential Equations, 224 
Diploma, Admision on, 38 
Dissection, Clinic, 130 
Domestic Animals, Anatomy of, 115 
Domestic Economy, Department of, 

257 
Drainage, Farm, 63 
Drawing, Free Hand, 150 
Drawing, Entrance Requirements 

in, 37 
Drawing, Mechanical, 150 
Dressmaking, 261 
Drill, Military, 279 

Dynamo Electric Machinery, 179, 230 
Ecology, 241 
Economic Science, Department of, 

256 
Electrical Engineering, Course in, 

182 
Electrical Engineering, Department 

of, 176 
Electric Designing, 181 
Electricity, Applied, 180 



Electricity and Magnetism, 179 
Elocution and Oratory, Department 

of, 270 
Embryology, 249 
English, 267 
English, Entrance Requirements in, 

Engineering Laboratory, 149, 169 

Engineering Faculty, 136 

Engineering, Constructive, 149 

Engineering, Division of, 138 

Entomology, 248, 249 

Entrance Requirements, 28 

P^thics, 263 

Examination at Home, 37 

Expenses, 43 

Experiment Station, 107 

Experiment Station Staff, 106 

Faculty, General, 9 

Fellowship, Clay, Robinson & Co., 

T. 94 

terns, 245 

Field Crops and Farm Management, 
64 

Field Work, Engineering, 165 

Field Work in Mining, 190 

Field Work, Horticulture, 79 

Floriculture, Amateur, 80 

Foods, 259 

Forestry, 78 

Forestry, Department of Horticul- 
ture and, 76 

Framed Structures, 169 

Free Hand Drawing, 150 

French, 275 

Freshman Year, Admission to, 30 

Gardening, Landscape, 79 

Geology and Mineralogy Depart- 
ment of, 251 

Geology, Economic, 255 

Geology, General, 254 

Geometry, Analytic, 233 

Geometry, Descriptive, 165 

Geometry, Plane, 221 

Geometry, Solid, 222 

German, 276 

Glazes, Chemistry of Clays and, 85 

Government, 48 

Grammar, Advanced, 34 

Grammar, Preparatory, 33 

Green House Management, 78 

Grounds, 26 

Haulage and Ventilation, 189 

Heat, P)lectricity and Magnetism, 
179, 228 

Histology, Animal, 116 

Histology, Vegetable, 241 

Historical, 18 

History, Department of, 276 

History, Entrance Requirements in, 
36 

Horse Shoeing, 127 

Horticultural and Forestry, Depart- 
ment of, 76 

Horticulture, Literature of, 79 

Horticulture, Research in, n>> 

Hospital, The College, 45 

Hydraulic Engineering, 170 



Hydraulics, 149 

Jurisprudence, 130 

Laboratory, Electrical, 230 

Laboratory, Engineering, 149, 168 

Laboratory, Physics, 230 

Landscape Gardening, 79 

Languages, Department of Modern, 
275 

Latin, 274 

Lecturers, Non-Resident, 13 

Lettering, 164 

Library, 280 

Library Work, 282 

Light and Sound, 228 

Literature, 269 

Literature and Rhetoric, Depart- 
ment of, 264 

Live Stock, 75 

Machine Design, 149 

Manual Labor, 47 

Margaret Hall, 26 

Masonry Structures, 170 

Materials of Construction, 148 

Materia Medica, 118 

Mathematics, Entrance Require- 
ments, 30 

Mathematics, Department of, 217 

Meat Inspection, Milk and, 129 

Mechanical Drawing, 150 

Mechanical Engineering, Course in, 
152 

Mechanical Engineering, Depart- 
ment of, 144 

Mechanics, Analytical, 148 

Mechanics, Light and Sound, 179, 228 

Medicine, Veterinary, 125 

Metallurgy, 235 

Micro-Chemistrj", 245 

Military .Science and Tactics, 279 

Milk and Meat Inspection, 129 

Milk and Its Products, 68 

Milk Testing, 69 

Mine Exploration and Operation, 189 

Mineralogy, 253 

Mining, Department of Geology and 
Mineralogy, The Principles of 1 

25 1 

Mining Arithmetic, 189 

Mining Engineering, 189 

Mining Engineering, Course in, 192 

Mining Engineering, Department of 

185 
Mining Engineering, Two Years' 

Course in, 195 
Mining Engineering, Review Course 

in, 106 
Morphology, 246, 250 
Music, Department of, 282 
Mycology, 246 
Neurology, 250 
Organic Chemistry in Relation to 

Engineering, 86 
Obstetrics, 127 
Olericulture, 79 
Orations, 271 
Oratory, Department of Elocution 

and, 270 
Parasites, Animal, 250 



Parry Collection, 240 

Pasteurization, 70 

Pathology, General. 120 

Pathology, Special, 121 

Pathology, Vegetable, 242 

Petrography, 255 

Phanerograms, General Systematic, 

244 
Pharmacy, 119 

Philosophy, Department of, 263 
Photography, 229 
Physical Culture, 283 
Physical Laboratory, 180 ,230 
Physics, Department of, 226 
Physics, Agricultural, 63 
Physics, Soil, 63 
Physiography, 254 
Physiology, Comparative, 117 
Physiology, Vegetable, 243 
Physiology, Human, 251 
Plants, Evolution of, 245 
Plants, Evolution of Cultivated. 79 
Political Economy, 256 
Pomology, 79 

Post Graduate Degrees, 52 
Practical Agriculture, Department 

of, 62 
Principles of Breeding, 75 
Psychology, 263 
Quantitative Analysis, 236 
Railway Engineering, 169 
Religious Associations, 49 
Rhetoric, 268 
Rhetoric, Department of Literature 

and, 264 
Rhetoric, Elementary, 267 
Roads and Pavements, 168 
Sanitary Engineering, 170 
Sanitary Science, 128 
Schools, Accredited, 39 
Schools, Partially Accredited, 41 
Science, Course in, 206 
Science, Faculty, 202 
Science, General and Domestic, 

Course in, 211 
Science as Related to the Industries, 

Division of, 201 



Seeds and Seed Testing, 244 
Seminar, Botanical, 245 
Seminar, Electrical Engineering, 182 
Seminar, Civil Engineering, 171 
Seminar, Mechanical Engineering, 

Seminar, Mining Engineering, 189 
Sewage Disposal Plant, 157 
Sewing, 261 

Shades and Shadows and Perspec- 
tive, 166 
Shop Work, 151 
Societies, Literary, 49 
Societies, Technical, 49 
Soundness, Examination for 130 
Special Students, 50 
Specifications and Contracts, 149 
Steam Engine, 148 
Steam Engine Design, 149 
Stereotomy, 169 
Stock and Grain Judging 2 74 
Students, Alphabetical List of, 286 
Surgery, Veterinary, 126 
Surveying, 166 
Surveying, Mine, 190 
Surveying, Summer School of, 172 
Tactics, Military, 279 
Technology, 198 
Technology, Course in, 199 
Telephony, 180 
Therapeutics, 119 
Theses, 51 

Tinting and Shading, 165 
Trigonometry, Plane, 222 
Trigonometry, Spherical, 223 
Trustees, 6 

Ventilation and Haulage, 189 
Veterinary Medicine, Course in, 131 
Veterinary Medicine, Division of, 

Veterinary Medicine Faculty, 112 
Water Works, 157 
Zoology, Vertebrate, 248 
Zoology, Invertebrate, 249 
Zoology, Department of, 247 



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